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Full text of "Report of the Corporation Commission for the biennial period .."

Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/reportofcorporat1922nort 



North Carolina State Library 

STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA 






TWENTY-FIRST REPORT 



OF THE 



Corporation Commission 



FOR THE 



BIENNIAL PERIOD, 1921-1922 



COMPILATIONS FROM RAILROAD RETURNS ARE FOR YEARS ENDING 
DECEMBER 31, 1920 AND 1921 



RALEIGH 

Commercial Printing Company 

State Printers 

1923 



STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA 
CORPORATION COMMISSION 



W. T. LEE, Chairman; 
GEORGE P. PELL, 
A. J. MAXWELL, 

Commissioners. 



R. O. Self, Clerk. 

Miss E. G. Riddick, Assistant Clerk. 

Miss Mary Shaw, Stenographer. 



RATE DEPARTMENT 

W. G. WoMBLE, Rate Clerk. 
Edgar Womble, Assistant Clerk. 
Frances T. Abernethy, Stenographer. 

BANKING DEPARTMENT 

Clarence Latham, Chief State Bank Examiner 

State Bank Examiners 
John Mitchell, W. L. Williams, Jr., 

W. L. Burns, Jno. G. Nichols, 

H. L. Newbold. 

Assistant State Bank Examiners 

L. H. Harrison, C. S. Grainger,'Jr., 

R. E. Kerr, M. C. Crowson, 

D. M. Darden. 



C. C. Meroney, Bank Clerk. 
Mabel Morris, Stenographer. 
Alice Latham, Stenographer. 
Grace Lee, Typist. 



LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL 



Raleigh, December 31, 1922. 

To His Excellency, Cameron Morrison, 

Governor of North Carolina. 
Sir:— 

As required by section 1065, chapter 21, C. S., the Corporation Commission has 
the honor to report for the years 1921 and 1922, as follows: 

The Commission was established by an act of the General Assembly in 1899, 
superseding the Railroad Commission, established in 1891. During this period the 
Commission has averaged 300 formal cases annually. 

During the period covered by this report, the Commission has docketed two 
hundred and eighty-five formal cases — of which twenty-two are pending. Appeals 
from orders of the Commission were taken in seven cases — four by railroads, two by 
cities, one by consumers of electric power. One telephone utility, in taking ex- 
ceptions to the Commission's order, filed a bill in equity in the United States Court. 
None of the issues involved in these appeals have been determined. 

During the evolution of pubHc utility service, various methods of regulating rates 
have been tried. Of recent years, it has come to be the almost universal custom for 
legislative bodies to vest the rate-making power in commissions which are author- 
ized, after proper investigation, to adjust public utility rates as the cost of rendering 
such service may advance or decline. With the exception of Delaware, each state 
now has such commissions, with varied jurisdictions, and North Carolina was one 
of the pioneers in adopting such method. New York has two, and Hawaii, Philip- 
pine Islands, and Porto Rico, one each. 

Except for laws rendering flexible such rates by action of the Commission, many 
utilities would have been forced into bankruptcy by the rapid increase in, and main- 
tained, high cost of fuel, labor and material. 

Appreciating the importance of public utility service as among the essentials in 
maintaining modern civilization and the strength and efficiency of government, the 
President of the United States, during the early days of our entry into the World 
War, issued a special appeal to State Commissions to treat their utilities fairly and 
maintain them at their maximum efficiency as a part of our National equipment for 
the prosecution of the war. This appeal was emphasized by the action of all govern- 
mental agencies in charge of the Federally controlled utilities in increasing such 
rates, and had not this policy been followed there would have been curtailment of 
utihty service and receiverships in many parts of the State, with large expenses and 
higher rates to be paid by the public in the end. Fortunately, during this period, 
only the Carolina and Yadkin River Railroad, in this State, was placed in hands of a 
receiver, and petition for abandonment has been filed. 

These rate increases, during Federal control, were immediately consumed in in- 
creases in operating expenses, and out of the record of post-war investigations of 
thirty-two State Commissions only eight were able to make slight modifications, and 
these, in most instances, affected specific charges for services or material, rather than 
the established basic rates for the product or service in question. 

As an illustration of this increased expense of operation, we have before us statis- 
tics which indicate that since 1914 one utihty has had labor increases of more than 



4 LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL 

100%; maintenance material of over 40%; not to speak of franchises and taxes. 
Therefore, measuring its present income by what is estimated to be the present pur- 
chasing value of the dollar, its average charge today is more than 10% lower than in 
1914. 

The products of these utilities enter so fully into the development of the State 
that they have become essential to the welfare and convenience of the public, and 
where the service is adequate and the rates charged therefor are reasonable, the mu- 
tuality of interest between the utilities and the public is as nearly absolute as is pos- 
sible. It is one of the purposes of this Commission to promote this mutuahty of 
interest in the property and affairs of our utilities and the State's economic growth, 
and this can only be done to the greatest advantage when our utilities are required 
to render adequate service for reasonable remuneration. 

The State has realized that the development of its institutions could not wait for 
relief from direct taxation, and issued long-term securities instead. Just so, public 
utilities cannot provide for permanent improvements from current revenue from 
operations, and authorities estimate that an average security issue of S700.00 is 
necessary to provide a modern residence with water, gas, electric light and telephone 
connections. 

Continual demands are being made for extension of service, and the utilities must 
plan comprehensively to meet such demands. The development and growth of any 
business or industry requires capital, and financing must of necessity precede con- 
struction. Money is a commodity of world-wide demand, and seeks the market 
affording the safest and surest returns, and cannot be obtained unless the investing 
public is assured safety of investment and continuity of returns. 

As an indication of what the present demand on public utilities may be, the popu- 
lation of twenty cities and towns, constituting our business and manufacturing 
centers, within twenty years has shown increases varying from 100% to more than 
400%. Reference to Federal statistics shows that during this period investment in 
railroad plant and equipment has increased 135%, and investment in telephone 
plants has increased approximately 960% to take care of the increased number of 
telephones of approximately 1240%. What is true of the Nation is undoubtedly 
proportionately true of North Carolina, and in some instances may exceed the 
national average; therefore, we must realize that the problem of financing public 
utilities to take care of the rapid growth and increased demand for such services 
stands in the forefront of economic issues and is decidedly one of the great problems 
of the time, because of its unquestionably vital effect upon the immediate develop- 
ment of the State. 

Electric Power Development 

This is truly the "electric age." This business with its great organizations has 
grown out of the isolated electric plant serving an individual community. The 
past few years has witnessed a most remarkable degree of concentration in the 
electric utility business. During the low-water period of 1921 and 1922, Goldsboro 
and Henderson, N. C, have been on inter-connecting transmission fines with Sheffield, 
Ala., and Nashville, Tenn. Without this connection west of the Savannah River we 
have within our jurisdiction, or adjacent for available transmission, hydro-electric 
power, with steam auxiliaries, producing 760,000 horsepower. The auxiliary steam 
plants of the east are connected with the arteries of the industries of the west, and 
the rivers of the Blue Ridge have become an asset to those who live on the level 
lands below. This has made possible the location in North Carolina a total of 6,264 
manufacturing plants, with an invested capital of $916,039,159.00, with an an- 



LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL 5 

nual output of manufactured products valued at $758,732,141.00, with 185,295 
employees. 

At the close of the year 1921 the 80 privately owned and operated electric utilities 
had an invested capital of $45,335,173.00, with an income from operations 
of $14,432,595.64, and operating expenses and taxes of $11,079,112.99, leaving a 
net income of $3,353,482.65, or 7.3% on the investment, without setting apart any- 
thing for depreciation. Stating it differently, for every dollar received for electric 
service in 1921, 76.76 cents was required to meet operating expenses and taxes. 

Gas Utilities 

On January 1, 1921, the Commission established and promulgated a standard of 
quality for gas, and prescribed rules and regulations for the enforcement of and 
obedience to the same. On very few occasions has the need for an engineering de- 
partment more greatly manifested itself than during this investigation, which covered 
a period of approximately eight months. The United States Bureau of Standards, 
with a view of fostering such standardization, found it possible to lend for a short 
period, without cost to the State, the services of a competent engineer with testing 
and other equipment necessary. 

In order to comply with the established standard, additions and improvements 
to plants and distribution systems have been made, which have practically obviated 
service complaints. 

No business within our observation has faced more hazards than has the gas in- 
dustry. Sharp and sudden advances in the price of gas-producing fuels have occurred 
with such frequency that it has been difficult at times to maintain a rate that would 
produce even expenses of operation. This was particularly true of the years 1919 
and 1920, and the year 1922 has presented considerable repetition of these difficulties. 

Complete reports for the year 1921 show gas sales of 786,909,100 cubic feet; in- 
vested capital, $6,067,442.22; operating revenue, $1,561,172.59; gross operating ex- 
penses, $1,061,685.33, leaving the net revenue $499,487.26, or 83^% on the invest- 
ment. This figure, however, does not include reserve for depreciation, which is 
naturally heavier in the gas industry than in some other classes of public service. 

Street Railways 

The increasing competition with automobile and auto bus traffic has made it ex- 
ceedingly difficult for street railway utilities to provide necessary equipment and 
extension to keep pace with the rapid growth of our cities, and especially has it been 
difficult to provide, in addition to operating expenses, funds to meet the legal re- 
quirement of their part of the extensive street improvement in the several cities. 

Reports for the year 1921 indicate approximately ten million dollars invested in 
street railway utiUties and show operating revenue of $2,363,123.54 against operat- 
ing expenses of $1,918,531.57, or a net revenue of $445,643.29, or 4.45% on the 
investment. 

Telephone Utilities 

How short has been the history of this utility was impressed upon us recently 
when we read of the death of Alexander Graham Bell, the inventor of the telephone. 
In less than half a century the telephone was developed from the experimental stage 
demonstrated at the Philadelphia Centennial Exposition to practically a world-wide 
utility, serving many millions of people, and supplying a medium for transacting a 
large part of the world's business. Perhaps the telephone should be styled the 
pioneer utility. Where its lines go, other utilities follow. 



6 LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL 

The extent of the industry in North Carohna can be more readily comprehended 
when we reahze that the 190 companies are operating 332 exchanges connecting 
32,731 business and 63,706 residence phones, with 25,507 miles of wire, or more than 
a sufficient number of miles to run a continuous line around the world. 

From complete reports for the year 1921, the operating revenue for all companies 
was $3,679,695.31, against $3,335,575.01 operating expenses — leaving a net revenue 
of $344,120.20, or 3 1-3% on an investment of $10,486,400.00. It is not conceded 
that the undepreciated investment account of telephone properties represents their 
actual value, or that the apportionment of long distance revenue is made on a proper 
basis. 

Express Companies 

On December 7, 1920, the express transportation business and property devoted 
to that business of the Adams, American, Wells Fargo & Co., and the Southern Ex- 
press Companies were consolidated into the American Railway Express Company, 
under which express transportation had been operating for a period during the war. 

On May 1, 1920, the Southeastern Express Company came into existence, and 
operates in this State only on the Hues of the Southern Railway. The competitive 
operation of the two companies often resulted in the circuitous routing of express, to 
the inconvenience and expense of the public. This resulted in the issuance of a 
routing order by the Corporation Commission, requiring all express shipments to be 
transported over the shortest routes between points in North CaroUna and have pre- 
sented arguments to the Interstate Commerce Commission in case now pending 
favoring similar rule by that body to apply on interstate traffic. 

Telegraph Companies 

The two companies operating in this State on 3,968.32 miles of pole and cable 
line, for the year 1921, received $337,803.56 from intrastate business. Receipts for 
the same period of interstate business was $1,062,850.19. Just what investment 
these companies have is difficult to ascertain, as many of their lines are leased or 
operated jointly with telephone companies and railroads. 

State Regulation of Motor Vehicle Transportation 

Without exception. State regulation of motor vehicle common carriers has been 
vested in pre-existing State agencies that exercise control over other forms of com- 
mon carriers, such as railroads, trolleys, telephones, telegraph, etc. For this reason, 
inquiries in regard to this subject have been addressed to this office, and, therefore, 
the Commission's authority for reference thereto. Many requests for legislation on 
this subject have been received — some of which have been referred to the office of 
the Governor. Twenty-two states provide for a greater or lesser degree of such 
state control. 

Motor vehicles are subjected to two general but distinct uses; first, they are pri- 
vately employed by their owners for the transportation of persons or property; second, 
for the transportation for hire of persons or property of others than their owners. 

The second general use is subdivided into two definite and particular uses. In 
the first place, motor vehicles operating for hire are employed to carry certain per- 
sons or property of certain persons to places prescribed in individual agreements 
entered into for the purpose; in the second place, they are employed to carry in- 
discriminately all persons or the property of all persons under general conditions of 
agreement applicable to the whole public. 



I 



LETTEE OF TRANSMITTAL i 

In a word, the second general use of motor vehicles, i.e., for hire, spUts into that of 
Private Carriers and Common Carriers. Those who advocate State regulation of 
such common carriers insist that such control is necessary; 

(1) Because motor transportation for hire is a public utility, and as such should 
be regulated along with other public vehicles so that travellers and shippers by such 
means can be made sure of safe, prompt, regular, adequate, efficient and economical 
service. 

(2) So that, in all cases where motor vehicle common carriers come, or are likely 
to come, in ruinous competition with other common carriers, the State can step in 
and determine whether pubhc convenience and necessity require such competition, 
and save, if desirable, the pre-existing agencies of transportation. 

(3) In order to shoulder upon the motor vehicle common carrier obligations, 
financial and otherwise, in return for the rights given it to operate for a profit over 
all or certain highways within a state, especially so since the highways are built 
and maintained by the pubhc. 

(4) For the purpose of eliminating the irresponsible, so-called "fly-by-night" 
companies and individuals, who, while undergoing certain destruction for themselves, 
pull down with the ruin well-managed motor transportation agencies which render a 
real pubhc service, and are entitled to a reasonable return on their investments, and 
a stabilization of their business. 

Reference to this subject is purely informative, but the question as to whether 
North Carolina shall extend control to this class of transportation and traffic is 
worthy of your careful consideration. 

Coal Distribution 

For the third time in as many years, there developed again this year a crisis in the 
production and distribution of coal, the latter more serious than any preceding ones, 
because of simultaneous strikes in mines and railroad shops. The supervision of 
the distribution of coal by the Federal Government in this emergency imposed upon 
the State governments the necessity for State supervision of distribution within the 
states. The Council of State took prompt action in the matter, and placed this re- 
sponsibility on the Corporation Commission, with liberal provision for assistance in 
handling this large problem. The Commission, in turn, imposed this responsibility 
on its Chief Clerk. 

How Long Will Unregulated Control of this Industry be Tolerated? 

By assuming authority which did not exist to control distribution; by perfecting 
within a week a widespread organization; by promptly utilizing every resource, in- 
cluding assumption of liability for payment for many thousands of dollars worth of 
coal, and with the cooperation of all users and local distributors of coal, an actual 
calamity was narrowly averted, and there was an even distribution of supply barely 
sufficient to keep industries going, and to prevent actual distress. But we do not 
deem that we have dealt adequately with this situation by exchanging congratula- 
tions because actual and widespread calamity was by extraordinary means narrowly 
averted, while users have had to pay, and still have to pay, three and four prices for 
coal at the mines. 

No other single commodity bears a closer relation to the welfare of all the people 
than does coal. Our survey in this crisis shows that more than two miUion seven 
hundred thousand tons are consumed annually in this State, exclusive of coal used 
by transportation companies. We are not indebted to any companies or individuals 



8 LETTEE OF TRANSMITTAL 

for its manufacture; it needs only to be mined and dumped on railroad cars which 
run under their tipples at the mines. The public is entitled to have not only a 
regular and dependable supply of this essential commodity, but at reasonable cost. 

If we concede that coal mine operators are entitled to an increase of a hundred per 
cent for coal at the mines, as compared with the prewar level, upon that basis they 
have extorted unjustly from the people of this State, for the year 1922, over and 
above the one hundred per cent increase in price at the mines a sum of money greater 
than all the revenue collected by the government of the State for all its institutions, 
agencies and activities, including its maintenance of the State system of public 
highways. 

This form of extortion affects the individual citizen not only in the cost of heating 
his house or driving his industry: it is in large part the basis for "continuing high 
charges for transportation, for gas and other essential public services. Even our 
hydro-electric companies are heavy users of steam coal in equalizing their power out- 
put in dry seasons, and the cost of coal is an important factor in the average cost of 
their power. The unreasonably high cost of coal is the most important primary 
factor in the continued high cost of living. 

We regulate other forms of monopoly in essential industries. We regulate charges 
for transportation and other forms of necessary public service, but their services are 
all built on top of the unregulated exactions of the coal operators; we permit the un- 
reasonable swelling of all such charges by permitting this primary and monopolized 
industry of digging coal out of the ground to lev}^ its unmeasured tribute, which 
enters heavily into the necessary expenses of rendering these public services. 

We have gotten a few feet away from the threat of freezing — for the present — but 
we are paying a price that invites the charge of robbery. There is widespread be- 
lief that mine owners prefer labor troubles. Their net profits for one month of oper- 
ations after a six months tie-up are greater than for twelve months on a normal basis. 
They face the cheerful prospect of another tie-up next April, that should educate the 
public to expect a still higher price for indemnity against freezing another winter. 

There is no remedy within reach of the state, but the national scope of the prob- 
lem gives us an equal privilege of lifting a tune of protest. Nothing less than a 
liberal use of the strong arm of the Federal Government can provide adequate 
relief. The outstanding element of demonstrated fact is that unregulated private 
control of this great essential industry is an expensive failure, and remedial action 
should not wait upon the development of another crisis in production, and upon 
the benevolent purposes of coal producers to reduce the price to a reasonable basis. 

Banking Department 

In 1899 the Commission was given supervision of all state banks. At that time 
there were fifty-two state banks, twenty-one private banks, and eight savings banks 
operating under the state system, making a total of eighty-one banking institutions. 
This number had increased to 546 on December 1, 1922, or a total increase of ap- 
proximately 575%. On December 2, 1899, the total banking resources were $13,222,- 
501.12. On September 15, 1922, the total banking resources were $254,588,817.07,- 
being an increase of $241,366,312.95, or a percentage increase of approximately 
1825%. On September 4, 1912 (ten years prior to the last call) the total resources 
were only $75,497,136.11. 

As required by law, the Department has examined every bank at least once during 
the year 1922, and in addition to this has made 249 special examinations, making a 
total of 794 examinations during the year 1922, up to the first of December. 



LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL 9 

During the year 1921, twenty-six banks were authorized to begin business, which 
number included seven branch banks; and, during the year 1922, nineteen banks 
were authorized, which included eleven branch banks. 

There has been a consolidation of eleven banks in 1921 and twelve in 1922, in- 
cluding branch banks that have been consolidated with their home offices; a liqui- 
dation of two banks in 1921 and three banks in 1922, wherein the depositors and 
creditors of these banks were settled with in full; and four State banks surrended 
their charters as State institutions and went into the National system during 1922, 
none in 1921. 

During the year 1921 the Commission closed twelve banks, involving $2,352,- 
251.49, and in 1922 closed five banks, involving $1,761,135.96 — a total of seventeen 
banks closed, involving $4,113,387.45 during the two years. Of the resources in- 
volved, an estimate of the total or percentage loss at this time is problematical, 
and varies in accordance with the deficit and the amount of capital stock. 

These failures for the most part were caused on account of over-extended con- 
ditions, and shrinkage in value of assets held by these banks. In a few instances the 
failures were caused on account of dishonesty and bad management. A number of 
defaulting bank officers have been prosecuted by the Department within the last two 
years, and several are now serving terms in the State Prison on account of such de- 
falcations. 

In the opinion of the Commission, the aggregate amount involved in these failures 
is small, when the large number of bank failures in other parts of the United States, 
and the large amounts involved, are taken into consideration. The Department is 
reliably informed that in one Southern State, laboring under practically the same 
conditions that existed in North Carolina, covering a period of only twelve months, 
forty-three state bank failures occurred, involving an amount exceeding twelve 
million dollars, while one other adjoining state in two years had thirty-two failures 
involving over twenty million dollars. 

Measured by proportion of total resources, less than one per cent of the total re- 
sources of state banks were involved in failure in the worst year of this most trying 
financial period, and a large per cent of the liabilities of this small number will be 
met in the liquidation of their assets, and the liabilities of some of them will be met 
in full. Stated in the reverse order, more than ninety-nine per cent of our State 
banks, measured by percentage of total resources, remained unshaken by this severe 
test, which was unprecedented in intensity, and in its swift development. In con- 
sidering the small number of banks that were swept into liquidation by this storm, 
there should be cause for satisfaction that banks holding more than ninety-nine 
per cent of resources stood this unprecedented test, which required many of them to 
liquidate more than half of their total resources within the short period of a few 
months to meet the new conditions. 

The New Banking Law 

More than five hundred banks have grown up under banking laws that were known 
to be inadequate. It had for many years been a biennial habit of our Banking De- 
partment to carefully draft a complete revision of our banking laws, only to have it 
cut to pieces and rejected in the legislative mill. As long as the weather was fair, 
any kind of a roof would serve. It was under these conditions of regulation that 
the storm broke upon them in the fall of 1920, which demonstrated the necessity for 
more stringent regulation. Under these conditions, a Department bill, which repre- 
sented a complete revision of our banking laws, and based upon the best to be found 



10 LETTEK OF TRANSMITTAL 

in the statutes of other states, met a friendly reception in the last General Assembly 
and with slight modifications was enacted into law. Some of the new protective 
features embodied in the new law are: 

Increasing minimum capital for banks in small towns from $5,000.00 to $15,000.00, 
with graduated increase for towns of larger population. 

Limiting loans under any conditions to 25 per cent of capital and surplus. 

Authority to prevent organization of unnecessary banks. 

Restricting establishment of branch banks. 

Limiting investment in stocks and bonds of other corporations. 

Prohibiting active officers and employees of a bank borrowing its funds in any 
amount except upon ample security and upon approval of a majority of directors. 

Making it unlawful to issue certificates of deposit for anything other than lawful 
money. 

Requiring meeting of directors at least quarterly. 

Requiring appointment of loan or executive committee and prescribing duties. 

Requiring minutes of directors and loan committee. 

Prescribing qualifications of directors and requiring oath. 

Making directors personally liable for neglect of duties. 

Requiring annual audit by committee from stockholders. 

Restricting conditions under which dividends may be paid. 

Making overdrafts unlawful except under certain conditions. 

Requiring all active officers and employees to give surety bond. 

Giving Commission authority to require removal of incompetent officers, etc. 

The most important modification of the bill presented by the Department to the 
last General Assembly was the provision for semiannual examinations. This 
feature was not adopted. The Commission has exercised the discretion vested in it 
in the present law to have special examination made of 249 banks during the past 
year, in addition to the annual examination required by statute, making two examina- 
tions each for that number of banks. We renew our recommendation that express 
authority be given by statute to have all State banks examined semiannually. 
Certain other modifications were made in the revision of the law as proposed, which 
are not considered of primary importance, but experience has strengthened our 
opinion that they should be adopted in the public interest, and a supplementary bill 
will be presented covering these proposed changes for consideration of the General 
Assembly. With the exceptions indicated, we believe our new banking law the equal 
in protective features of that of any state, and with this added feature we believe 
that the regulation of our State banks will be of as high standard as may reasonably 
be required. 

Interstate Freight Rates 

Since our last biennial report, decision has been rendered by the Interstate Com- 
merce Commission in Dockets 10,500, 10,515, prosecuted jointly by the Corporation 
Commission and certain Chambers of Commerce. The decision of the Commission 
was a substantial recognition of discrimination against North Carolina cities in the 
former relationship of rates between points in this State and all southern points, 
and between points in this State and all northern points, and rates on all classes were 
revised by the carriers in conformity with this decision, and the new rates put into 
effect January 15, 1922. These revised rates to and from northern points are on a 
differential basis of 60 cents first-class over Richmond and Norfolk, or 40 cents less 
than full combination, and revised rates to and from southern points are on differen- 



f 



LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL 11 

tial basis under Virginia cities on zone schedules from 5 to 42 cents first-class less 
than rates to and from Virginia cities. The decision of the Commission also laid 
down certain general rules by which the carriers were expected to revise rates on spe- 
cific commodities. The carriers have seemed unreasonably slow in revising their 
commodity rates in line with these findings, but under continual prodding the work 
is now well under way, and we have assurance that all revised commodity rates from 
northern points will be completed early in January, and that like revision will 
promptly follow on commodity rates from southern points. 

Southeastern Rate Invi:stigation 

The general southeastern rate investigation that is now under way is of greater 
importance to North Carolina than any like investigation which has been undertaken 
at one time. It has imposed upon the Corporation Commission and shippers' organ- 
izations the necessity of meeting the most unreasonable efforts ever made by the 
carriers serving North Carolina to impose unjust and discriminatory rates upon 
North Carolina shippers, and has at the same time presented opportunity to contest 
under favorable conditions the important adjustment of rates to and from the 
Central West. Some concession was made in this important adjustment in 1913, 
but this concession was much less than we are entitled to have under the trend of 
principles employed in more recent decisions of the Interstate Commerce Com- 
mission; but the carriers are endeavoring to cancel that adjustment and to put in 
rates from western points relatively higher than those in effect prior to 1914. 

Appreciating the vital importance of this situation, the Corporation Commission 
has caused to be prepared and presented in this proceeding the most elaborate 
analysis of our freight rate situation ever made in any proceeding, and with con- 
currence and approval of Your Excellency has employed able counsel to defend the 
State's interests in 'this vital matter. Upon the record developed in this case we 
can but hope and believe that the unreasonable demands of the carriers will not be 
sustained, and that substantial concessions in the present unreasonable level and 
relationship of the important western adjustment of rates will be decreed by the 
Interstate Commerce Commission in its final decision in this case. 

We desire to make appreciative acknowledgment of the interest and cooperation 
and support which Your Excellency has at all times given us in this important 
matter. 

Unsatisfactory Handling of Shipments of Freight 
Between Points in This State 

The handling of less-than-carload shipments of freight between points in this State 
has never been satisfactory, when considered with relation to the reasonable time in 
which such shipments should be handled, or with relation to the time in which like 
shipments are handled from common points outside of the State. This is particularly 
true as to shipments over two or more railroad lines and requiring transfer, or to 
shipments over a single line having to go through a transfer point. While we have 
reason to believe that there has been gratifying progress in the distribution of articles 
of commerce and manufacture between points in this State, this development is 
greatly handicapped by unreasonable and vexatious delays in local freight service. 
The disparity in service between points in this State as compared with like service 
from certain common points outside of the State amounts to as great a handicap and 
discrimination as an actual discrimination in rates. Local freight, in less-than-car- 
load quantities, is handled from Richmond and Norfolk, for example, in expedited 
local freight service that generally equals express service. This expeditious service 



12 LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL 

is due to the substantial volume of such traffic moving from these points : over com- 
peting lines to common points in this State. Where there is the lack of competition 
between points in this State, and where the movement of such traffic to destination 
over a particular line is not in heavy volume, the traffic is often subjected to such 
delays as almost deny an opportunity to maintain or develop business. It seems to 
be taken for granted by carrier management that such business will come to them any 
way it may be handled, and their preferred attention is given to business that may 
be lost to a more active competitor. If this theory was ever sound as a selfish rail- 
road policy, it is rapidly becoming less so by the development of a new competition 
that does not require the tracks of a competing railroad fine for its operation. On 
the other hand, we have many instances where shippers elect to pay the higher ex- 
press rates on such heavy commodities as solid cases of cotton piece goods, between 
nearby points, rather than submit to the almost certain delays of local freight service, 
and particularly where a transfer point is involved. 

Many efforts have been made to improve this situation. In 1903 a statute was 
enacted prescribing the maximum of a reasonable schedule for movement of freight 
shipments between points in this State, and imposing a substantial penalty for fail- 
ure to transport within such time. This statute undoubtedly resulted in some im- 
provement in service, but it has long since fallen into disfavor. Penalties do not 
provide a desirable or equitable form of remedy, and experience has shown that our 
people are slow to take advantage of such a remedy. It requires court action to 
enforce it, and it is now neither sought by shippers or feared by carriers. 

The Corporation Commission has at different times handled numerous specific 
complaints of unreasonable delays with carriers, and has at times made such com- 
plaints the subject of conference with responsible officials of the carriers, resulting 
in some cases in more expeditious handling, the inauguration of additional package 
peddler cars, etc., but we are convinced that this branch of railroad service in this 
State has not yet been given the consideration and treatment its importance de- 
serves. We are convinced that it would be in the interest of both shippers and 
carriers if the Commission should be given authority to employ, for a period and at a 
salary to be approved by the Council of State, an expert to work with shippers and 
carriers in working out satisfactory methods of handling local freight shipments. 
We would expect such an agent to spend his time in the field in ascertaining from 
carrier records actual performance in handling of shipments, to suggest practical 
methods for improvement in service where found to be needed, and if disagreement 
resulted with carriers, the developed facts could then be presented to the Commission 
by both parties for adjustment. We are convinced that this is the most practical 
way of dealing with this problem, and that the beneficial results of such handling 
would be of very great importance. 

Cooperation Between Interstate and State Commissions 

We shall not attempt to go back of the so-called Ex Parte 74 (Passenger Rate 
Section) decision of the Interstate Commerce Commission, 58 I. C. C, 220, July 29, 
1920. Following this decision most of the states granted, in whole or in part, the 
percentage increases authorized by the Interstate Commerce Commission. Failure 
to grant in entirety these percentage increase advances led to orders of the I. C. C. 
affecting rates in twenty-five states, including North Carolina. The orders of the 
I. C. C. were generally followed by injunction in the Federal Courts granted on af)- 
plication of the carriers. 



LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL 13 

During the time the Federal injunctions were maintained in states where the 
I. C. C. orders had prescribed intrastate fares, the authority of the Federal Com ■ 
mission was being determined by the United States Supreme Court. The Wis 
consin and New York cases, in opinions by Chief Justice Taft, sustained the power 
of the I. C. C. to prescribe intrastate rates under the so-called Esch-Cummins law, 
otherwise known as the Transportation Act of 1920. 

The North Carolina case, arising upon difference in rates of passenger fares pre- 
scribed by the General Assembly from the interstate rates prescribed by the Inter- 
state Commerce Commission, was decided by the I. C. C. February 12, 1921. The 
Wisconsin case, involving the same issue, was decided November 27, 1920, and was 
pending in the United States Supreme Court at the time the I. C. C. decision was 
rendered in the North Carolina case. The state of New York had a similar case 
pending in the U. S. Supreme Court which had been decided by the I. C. C. on No- 
vember 13, 1920. For the reason that the General SoHcitor of the National Associa- 
tion of Railroad and Public Utilities Commissioners had represented forty-two State 
Commissions before the I. C. C, and was at that time representing the states of Wis- 
consin and New York on these appeals and that the issues involved were the same as 
involved in our case, no appeal from the I. C. C. decision was perfected. These cases 
involved passenger fares prescribed by legislative enactment, but the question of 
whether the intrastate fare discriminated against persons engaged in interstate com- 
merce, or riding on interstate tickets was not of primary importance. The real 
question was whether the Interstate Commerce Commission had the authority under the 
Transportation Act of 1920 to declare a rate unreasonable because, in its opinion, it did 
not yield sufficient revenue to the carriers. In the Wisconsin case, the Court said 
(U. S. Adv. Opins. Apr. 1, 1922, p. 236, 242): 

"The new measure imposed an affirmative duty on the Interstate Commerce 
Commission to fix rates and to take other important steps to maintain an 
adequate railway service for the people of the United States. ... If that pur- 
pose is interfered with by a disparity of intrastate rates, the Commission is 
authorized to end the disparity by directly removing it. " 

This decision differed very little from the Shreveport case decision of June 8, 1914 
(U. S. 234, page 342). 

The two final paragraphs of the Wisconsin case decision stated further are as 
follows: 

"It is said that our conclusion gives the Commission unified control of interstate 
and intrastate commerce. It is only unified to the extent of maintaining efficient 
regulation of interstate commerce under the paramount power of Congress. It 
does not involve general regulation of intrastate commerce. Action of the Inter- 
state Commerce Commission in this regard should be directed to substantial 
disparity which operates as a real discrimination against and obstruction to inter- 
state commerce, and must leave appropriate discretion to the State authorities to 
deal with intrastate rates as between themselves on the general level which the In- 
terstate Commerce Commission has found to be fair to interstate commerce. 

"It may well turn out that the effect of a general order in increasing all rates, like 
the one at bar, will, in particular localities, reduce income instead of increasing it, 
by discouraging patronage. Such cases would be within the saving clause of the 
order herein, and make proper an application to the Interstate Commerce Com- 
mission for appropriate exception. So, too, in practice when the State Com- 



14 LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL 

missions shall recognize their obHgation to maintain a proportionate and equitable 
share of the income of the carriers from intrastate rates, conference between the 
Interstate Commerce Commission and the State Commissions may dispense with 
the necessity for any rigid Federal order as to the intrastate rates, and leave to 
the State Commissions power to deal with them and increase or reduce them in 
their discretion." 

Under the above sanction of the Court, the I. C. C. has referred many complaints 
concerning commodity rates to State Commissions, and, it is thought, has realized 
the difficulties confronting it in attempting to regulate all rates, and in signifying a 
willingness to avail itself of any feasible plan to cooperate with the states, Chairman 
McChord, under date of March 7, 1922, wrote Hon. Carl D. Jackson, President of 
the National Association of Railway and PubUc Utilities Commissioners, with a 
copy to State Commission, as follows: 

"In view of the two final paragraphs (quoted above) of the recent opinion of the 
U. S. Supreme Court in Railroad Commission v. C. B. & Q. R. R. Co., and of the 
provisions of paragraph (3) of Sec. 13 of the Interstate Commerce Act, we should 
be glad if a conference could be arranged in the near future between a committee 
representing your Association and a committee representing this Commission. 
We could participate in such a conference, if it were held in Washington, at any 
time during the latter part of this month after the 14th. 

"We wish in particular to consider what can appropriately be done in further- 
ance of the views expressed by the Supreme Court. 

"Will you be good enough to advise whether you deem such a conference 
advisable, and if so, what date would you suggest?" 

President Jackson appointed a committee to confer with the committee of the 
Interstate Commerce Commission, and as a result thereof the following cooperative 
plan was adopted; 

REPORT OF THE JOINT COMMITTEE OF THE INTERSTATE COM- 
MERCE COMMISSION AND OF THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF 
RAILWAY AND UTILITIES COMMISSIONERS ON CO-OPERATION. 

"Public regulation of our railroads is performed in part by a Commission repre- 
senting the Federal Government and in part by Commissions representing the various 
states. Conflicts of jurisdiction between the two systems of public regulation have 
arisen from time to time, resulting in litigation and action by the courts; but the 
Federal and State Commissions were alike created in the public interest and have a 
common purpose, namely, the maintenance of a transportation system which will in 
all respects best meet the public needs. In view of this common purpose they should 
and we believe they can work together for its attainment without conflict or resort 
to litigation. Such cooperation is contemplated by the Interstate Commerce Act 
as interpreted by the Supreme Court, and is highly desirable in the public interest. 

"The prime essential to such cooperation is reaHzation of the nature and difficul- 
ties of the common problem. The State Commissions reaUze that the railroads form 
a National transportation system which is not split into parts by state lines, and that 
the public interest demands a rate structure, state and interstate, as simple and 
harmonious as practicable. The Interstate Commerce Commission realizes that there 
is danger in overcentrahzation of authority, that the field of regulation is vast, and 



LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL 15 

that the State Commissions are often better informed than itself in regard to local 
conditions and local needs. 

"Following the general rate increase of 1920, the Interstate Commerce Com- 
mission, in certain instances where corresponding increases did not become effective 
within the states, issued orders affecting intrastate rates. Following the decision of 
the Supreme Court of the United States in the Wisconsin Passenger Fare case, 
action has been taken by several State Commissions which has enabled the Inter- 
state Commerce Commission to vacate certain of its orders affecting intrastate 
traffic within those states. It is anticipated that similar action will follow in other 
states. 

"In a yet more important aspect cooperation looks forward to and has in view the 
avoidance, so far as the public interest will permit, of such orders in the future. 
Paragraph 3 of Section 13 of the Interstate Commerce Act authorizes the Interstate 
Commerce Commission to avail itself of the cooperation, services, records, and 
facilities of State Commissions, to confer with them with respect to the relationship 
between rate structures and practices of carriers, and to hold joint hearings with 
them 'where the rate-making authority of a state is or may be affected by the action 
taken by the Commission. ' Our common purpose is to give the utmost force and 
effect to this provision of the law. 

"It is appreciated that time and experience may be required for the full develop- 
ment of methods and rules of procedure. Pending the establishment thereof, and 
for the purpose of making such cooperation immediately effective, it is the opinion 
of representatives of the Interstate Commerce Commission and of the State Com- 
missions that, except as in special cases it may be found desirable or necessary to 
deviate therefrom, the following procedure be followed: 

"Where petitions are filed with the Interstate Commerce Commission alleging 
that intrastate rates unjustly discriminate against interstate commerce, or persons 
or localities engaged therein, and asking the Commission to remove such discrimi- 
nation, if either a State Commission having jurisdiction over rates thus attacked, 
or the Federal Commission, desires a conference, it should notify the other without 
delay, and thereupon such a conference should be arranged, likewise without delay. 
If the case goes to trial, a joint hearing by the Interstate Commerce Commission and 
the Commission of the state affected should be held, provided a proceeding or pro- 
ceedings be pending before the State Commission in which action can be taken by it 
upon the common record. Such joint hearing should be followed by a conference to 
consider the facts developed of record, so as to provide opportunity for the removal 
of the unlawful discrimination, if any, by agreement. 

"Joint conference should be held on complaints attacking interstate rates in those 
cases where the decision of the Interstate Commerce Commission appears likely to 
affect, in substantial and important respects, the relationship between state and in- 
terstate rate structures; likewise, conferences should be held in the case of complaints 
attacking intrastate rates in those cases where the decision of the State Commission 
appears likely to affect, in substantial and important respects, the relationship be- 
tween state and interstate rate structures. Participation in the ensuing hearings, 
or in conference following submission, will be upon invitation of the Interstate Com- 
merce Commission if the complaint is filed with it, or of the State Commission if 
the complaint is filed with it. Joint hearings will be appropriate where similar 
issues are pending before the Interstate Commerce Commission and a State Com- 
mission, or informal conferences pending the decision of cases where there has been 
no participation in the prior hearings. 

—2 



16 LETTEK OF TRANSMITTAL 

"The provisions of the foregoing paragraph should include cases where it appears 
that the rate structures of two or more states, or in a group of states, may be affected 
by the proceedings pending. If by reason of the number of states affected, or other- 
wise, it shall be found impracticable or inconvenient for a member or employee of 
the Commission of each such state to participate in the joint hearings or conferences, 
the Commissions of the states affected should select a hmited number of represent- 
atives to so participate on their behalf and to report back to the several State Com- 
missions for appropriate action by them. 

"It is our judgment that State Commissions would not expect or desire to parti- 
cipate in a judicial capacity in joint hearings with the members of the Interstate 
Commerce Commission or its examiners in any cases in which they appear as ad- 
vocates. 

"In joint hearings involving interstate rates the rules of practice prescribed by the 
Interstate Commerce Commission shall govern as far as practicable. 

"The Federal and State Commissions should feel free to suggest to each other, and 
the State Commissions to hold among themselves, conferences on matters arising 
under their respective jurisdictions, with a view to harmonizing in so far as practi- 
cable rates and practices in neighboring states by appropriate action of the Com- 
missions of those states without proceedings before the Federal Commission. 

"It is desirable that there be continued in so far as practicable the practice of the 
Interstate Commerce Commission of calling upon a State Commission to hold hear- 
ings for it upon applications for certificates of public convenience and necessity, in-' 
volving construction of new lines or abandonment of old lines. In such matters 
joint conferences between the Interstate Commerce Commission and a State Com- 
mission may also be held upon request of either Commission. 

"The Interstate Commerce Act, and the rules of the Interstate Commerce Com- 
mission provide for notice to the states in certain matters affecting them, and the 
Interstate Commerce Commission has been complying therewith. The State Com- 
missions should develop methods of keeping the Interstate Commerce Commission 
advised on matters before them in which it may have an interest such as is indi- 
cated by the foregoing text. 

"It is realized that the cooperative action here provided for will be productive of 
delay in disposing of important matters unless the Federal and State Commissions 
respectively act with the utmost promptitude compatible with the circumstances. 

"Applying the cooperative principle, conferences may be arranged for the de- 
velopment of car service, distribution, and administration. May 2, 1922." 

As a result of this cooperative plan and of the spirit of the Interstate Commerce 
Commission to avail itself of the cooperation of the states, the state orders of the 
Interstate Commerce Commission have generally been revoked, and on May 8, 1922, 
the Interstate Commerce Commission issued a memorandum to the public in which 
it recited the dismissal of the Shreveport case, 23 I. C. C. 32; Vol. 234, U. S. 342; 
34 I. C. C. 472; 41 I. C. C. 83; 48 I. C. C. 312. The Interstate Commerce Com- 
mission has therefore put itself in a most favorable position to secure cooperation 
from the states. 

Concerning the cooperative agreement, the Interstate Commerce Commission, in 
its annual report to Congress, December 1, 1922, had this to say: 

' 'With the expansion of our railway systems and industrial activities, Federal 
regulation of interstate commerce and state regulation of intrastate commerce have 
become more and more closely interrelated. The avoidance of harmful maladjust- 
ments of interstate and intrastate rates and fares by coordinated efforts has long been 



North Carolina Slate Library 



LETTEK OF TRANSMITTAL 17 

recognized as desirable, but until recently the Federal and State Commissions have 
continued to perform their respective functions independently of one another to a 
large extent. This course has required of this Commission the condemnation of 
maladjustments which injuriously discriminated against interstate commerce and 
frequently their correction by revision of the intrastate rates and fares. In the 
Transportation Act, 1920, the Congress enjoined active cooperation between the 
regulatory bodies, and authorized this Commission to avail itself of the cooperation, 
services, records, and facilities of the state authorities in the enforcement of any pro- 
vision of the Interstate Commerce Act. The Supreme Court of the United States, 
in Railroad Commission of Wisconsin v. Chicago, BurHngton & Quincy Railroad 
Company, 257 U. S., 563, decided Feb. 27, 1922, emphasized the desirabihty of such 
cooperation. 

''On May 3, 1922, a joint committee composed of five members of this Commission 
and eight representatives of the State Commissions, sitting at Washington, formu- 
lated and reported a tentative plan of cooperation through joint conferences and 
hearings, which is reproduced in Appendix H. It is to be expected that experience 
will suggest improvements in this plan, but its general outline embodies what is be- 
lieved to be a sound working basis, and the progress already made thereunder encour- 
ages the hope of its ultimate success. The procedure outlined in the plan will, with 
the spirit of cooperation behind it, avoid conflict of authority and redound to the 
benefit of shipper, carrier, and public. 

'*In No. 13494, Southern Class Rate Investigation, and in No. 13930, Express 
Rates, 1922, together with other pending matters, committees representing inter- 
ested State Commissions are participating with us. 

''The cooperative program has incidentally resulted in the making of orders by 
State Commissions, and the consequent vacating by us of our previous orders affect- 
ing intrastate freight rates in many of the state rate cases." 

Your Commission was represented in the general rate investigation before the In- 
terstate Commerce Commission December, 1921, March, 1922, in support of freight 
and passenger rate reductions, after which a general reduction of ten per cent in 
freight rates was made. This reduction was not in addition to the reduction there- 
tofore granted on grain and hay, or voluntarily established by the carriers in their 
ten per cent reductions on all farm products, effective January 7, 1922. 

Numerous adjustments in exception sheet and commodity rates have been made. 
It is believed that the general level of rates on primary commodities, at least, is still 
too high, and that before the business of the country reaches normalcy there must be 
further adjustment. 

Railroad Statistics 

At the close of the year 1921, there were fifty-seven railroad companies in North 
Carolina, operating 4,941.15 miles of road, with a reported investment of $256,650,- 
663.52; gross operating revenue $73,859,611.12, against $61,013,368.94, operating ex- 
penses, leaving a net revenue of $12,846,242.18, or five per cent on the investment. 
These companies report a total capital stock of $111,327,411.67, and a funded debt 
of $157,013,089.99. 

Respectfully, 

W. T. Lee, Chairman, 
Attest: . Geo. P. Pell, Commissioner , 

R. O. Self, Chief Clerk, A. J. Maxwell, Commissioner. 

W. G. WoMBLE, Rate Clerk, 
Clarence Latham, Chief State Bank Examiner. 



/i{i»oi#«i« 



DECISIONS AND ADJUSTMENT OF COMPLAINTS 



IN RE APPLICATION OF CAROLINA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY. 

Order 

By the Commission: The petition of the CaroKna Power and Light Company 
for permission to increase fares on the street railway operated in the city of Raleigh 
to 8 cents, coming on to be heard, evidence was submitted and briefs filed by peti- 
tioner and respondent. 

It appears to this Commission that the petitioner is not now receiving sufficient 
income from passenger fares to provide a reasonable profit upon the investment made, 
and that even at a fare of 8 cents it could not earn, at present cost of operation, 
over 3 per cent. However, our Commission is bound to take judicial notice of 
the fact that the tendency of operating costs is downward, and it does not deem it 
wise at this time to grant the increased rate demanded. 

Therefore it is ordered that the petition be dismissed and that the petitioner be re- 
quired to furnish to this Commission and to the mayor of the city of Raleigh on the 
first days of February, March, April and May, 1921, a detailed statement of operat- 
ing revenues and costs of said company in the operation of said street railway, and 
that the city of Raleigh be required on May 3, 1921, to appear before this Com- 
mission at 10 o'clock a.m. to show cause why an order increasing the present rate to 
8 cents should not be made. Failing to show cause, the Commission may make 
such order. 

This January 10, 1921. R- O. Self, 

Clerk. 



STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA BEFORE THE CORPORATION COM- 
MISSION—IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF THE CARO- 
LINA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY FOR AUTHORITY TO CHARGE 
AN 8-CENT FARE ON STREET CARS IN THE CITY OF RALEIGH. 

Order 

This apphcation has been continued from time to time since October, 1920, with 
the hope that increased volume of business and operating economies would produce 
a satisfactory return without any further increase in fares. At the last hearing, 
however, it was shown that net revenues have materially decreased during the pres- 
ent year as compared with the calendar year 1920. Maintenance costs have in- 
creased rather than diminished on account of increasing necessity for repairs to street 
paving. The city of Raleigh is imposing upon the company, which it has the right 
to do, additional street paving that will require additional capital expenditure of 
$35,000.00. It has been necessary also to make capital expenditure of $20,000.00 
for additional cars. Under these circumstances the Raleigh Chamber of Commerce 
has, through its Board of Governors, approved the application of the petition for an 
increase of fares, and the officials of the city of Raleigh, represented at former hear- 
ings in opposition to the petition, have withdrawn opposition. A cash fare of 8 
cents will be authorized, with requirement that two tickets be sold for 15 cents, 
which is practically equivalent to a cash fare oil]^ cents, as almost every passenger 
will buy a return ticket. If the reports of the company under this rate of fare at any 



20 N. C. COKPOEATION COMMISSION 

time indicate sufficient earnings to justify a reduction of fares, the burden will be 
placed upon the company to justify the continuance of the rates of fare herein 
authorized. 

Ordered, That from and after January 1, 1922, and until further order, the Carolina 
Power and Light Company be authorized to charge 8 cents for single cash fares on 
its Raleigh street railway lines, and that it keep on sale in each car two tickets for 
15 cents. Also, that it continue, under existing rules, to sell book tickets for school 
children on the basis of round-trip for one cash fare. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 25th day of November, 1921. Clerk. 

Maxwell, Commissioner: Concurring in the order of the Commission in this case 
in so far as it denies at this time the relief prayed for in the petition, I must dissent 
from the finding that petitioner ''is not now receiving sufficient income to provide 
reasonable profit on its investment, and that even on 8 cents fare it could not 
earn at present cost of operation over 3 per cent." As further action on the 
petition is contemplated in May, I do not wish to be bound by this finding in the final 
determination that may be made of it. According to the evidence the petitioner's 
earnings from its street railway lines last year, on the very peak of high operating 
costs, were $52,113 above expenses of operation, and after spending $26,676 out of 
earnings to maintain the property, the present value of which is about five hundred 
and fifty thousand dollars ($550,000). With this amount of earnings made on the 
highest peak of operating costs; with its volume of business increasing about thirty- 
eight thousand dollars ($38,000) per year, and every reason to expect some operat- 
ing economies even under present conditions; with a fare 40 per cent above the pre- 
war level and general conditions returning to normal, it seems to me this finding 
should not be made, and that the petition should now be dismissed. 



BEFORE THE CORPORATION COMMISSION— IN RE PETITION OF THE 
PIEDMONT POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY FOR INCREASE IN 
STANDBY OR MINIMUM MONTHLY ELECTRIC LIGHT CHARGE IN 
THE TOWNS OF BURLINGTON, GRAHAM, MEBANE AND GIBSON- 
VILLE AND ADJACENT COMMUNITIES OUTSIDE OF THE INCORPO- 
RATIONS OF SAID TOWNS— PETITIONER. 

The above named company having filed its petition for increases in the minimum 
monthly charge for electric lighting, and the case having been heard on December 
21, 1920, with all the cities affected represented and presenting evidence, and from 
the facts and information developed at said hearing, it is 

Ordered, That the Commission's order of November 29, 1918, be amended by 
striking out of the last paragraph thereof the figure "7" and inserting in lieu thereof 
the figure ''12." 

This order shall be effective for January, 1921, meter readings. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This January 12, 1921. C^^rk. 

(See order July 24, 1922.) 



DECISIONS AND ADJUSTMENT OF COMPLAINTS 21 

IN RE PIEDMONT POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY PETITION TO IN- 
CREASE MINIMUM CHARGE FOR SERVICE IN THE TOWNS OF BUR- 
LINGTON, GRAHAM, MEBANE AND GIBSONVILLE. 

After further consideration of this case the Commission has decided to amend the 
order made on the 12th day of January as follows: 

For the first ten k.w. hours or less a charge shall be at 12 cents per k.w. hour, 
net $1.20 on bills paid within the first ten days of each month. On bills not paid on 
or before the 10th day of each month the company may charge for a minimum of 
eleven k.w. hours at 12 cents per k. w. hour, less 5 per cent. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 9th day of February, 1921. Clerk. 

(See under July 24, 1922.) 



THE HOME TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH COMPANY. 

To THE Commission: Application for increase in telephone rates for the city of 
Henderson. 

The Home Telephone and Telegraph Company having filed application with the 
Corporation Commission for an increase in its rates, it is 

Ordered, That application be granted, and the said Home Telephone and Tele- 
graph Company is hereby authorized to charge the following rates, effective Novem- 
ber 1, 1920, for the city of Henderson: 

Monthhj 
Rate 

Business, special line $ 4. 00 

Business, duplex station 3. 50 

Farmers Business, special line rate for each circuit carrying 

six stations or less 4. 00 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This January 17, 1921. Clerk. 

P.S. — This order was made prior to November 1, 1921, but not issued. 



BEFORE THE NORTH CAROLINA CORPORATION COMMISSION— IN RE 
APPLICATION OF THE LENOIR ELECTRIC COMPANY FOR INCREASE 
IN TELEPHONE RATES IN THE TOWN OF LENOIR, N. C. 

Exception having been filed to the order dated December 16, 1920, heretofore 
entered in this proceeding, upon reconsideration thereof and of the record in the 
proceeding, it is held and adjudged that the exceptions are not sustained by the 
record. Therefore, it is 

Ordered, That the exceptions be and they are hereby overruled. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This January 17th, 1921. Clerk. 



1 

22 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

BEFORE THE CORPORATION COMMISSION— IN THE MATTER OF THE 
APPLICATION OF THE HICKORY TELEPHONE COMPANY FOR IN- 
CREASE IN TELEPHONE RATES, IN HICKORY, N. C— PETITIONER. 

Upon receipt of the above application, the Commission served notice upon the 
Mayor of Hickory, and no objection having been lodged with the Commission, it is 

Ordered, That from and after February 1, 1921, the Hickory Telephone 
Company be, and it is, authorized to make charges for telephone service rendered 
from its exchange in the city of Hickory, as follows: 

Rate Inside Exchange Base Rate Area 

Rate 
Class of Service: Per Month 

Business, one-party line $ 4. 00 

Business, two-party line 3. 50 

*Business, four-party line 3. 00 

Business, extension 1.00 

Residence, one-party line 2. 50 

Residence, two-party line 2. 00 

*Residence, four-party hne 1.75 

Residence, extension desk equipment 1.50 

Residence, extension wall equipment 1.00 

*Business and residence 4-party line flat rate service available only out- 
side the base rate area. 

Rates for Miscellaneous Equipment and Service 

In connection with either business or residence stations, either inside 
or outside exchange base rate area: 

Rate 
Per Month 

Extension gong $ .50 

Extension bell .25 

Auxiliary receiver .15 

Operators head set .15 

Operators head set and chest transmitter .35 

Extra listing in directory .25 

Extra line in directory .25 

Rates Outside Base Rate Area 
Mileage Charges: 

Additional rate for extra distance beyond exchange base rate area, 
42 cents per month per one-fourth mile or fraction thereof. This 
charge to be prorated between two-party and four-party stations. 
Rural Line Service: 

For business and residence rural line service, beyond the base rate 
area, the minimum number of stations per circuit to be not less than 5, 
the telephone company to own and maintain main or trunk pole line 
and circuits, the subscribers to own and maintain spur lines or laterals, 
the telephone company to maintain all instruments as follows: 

Rural business, metallic $ 3. 00 

Rural business, grounded 2. 50 

Rural rer^idence, metallic. 2. 00 

Rural residence, grounded 1.50 

Farmers' Line Service: 

For business or residence farmers' line service, beyond the base rate 
area, the minimum number of stations per circuit to be not less than 6, 



DECISIONS AND ADJUSTMENT OF COMPLAINTS 2d 

the farmers to own and maintain any poles and wires outside base rate 

area, or point of connection with the telephone company's circuits, and 

instruments. 

Farmers' line , $ 1.00 

Proposed Rates for Miscellaneous Equipment and Service: 

. In connection with either business or residence stations, either inside 
or outside exchange base rate area: 

Rate 
Per Month 

Extension gong $ .50 

Extension bell .25 

Auxiliary receiver ' .15 

Operators head set .15 

Operators head set and chest transmitter .35 

Extra listing in directory .25 

Extra line in directory .25 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This January 28, 1921 Clerk. 



BEFORE THE CORPORATION COMMISSION— IN RE APPLICATION OF 
THE DURHAM TRACTION COMPANY FOR APPROVAL OF ELECTRIC 
LIGHTING RATES. 

Order 

Application having been made to this Commission for approval of a schedule of 
rates for lighting in the city of Durham, submitted by the Durham Traction Com- 
pany on February 21st, it is hereby 

Ordered, That the rates so filed be approved as rates to be charged consumers in 
said city for the month of February, 1921, and months subsequent thereto. 

This order subject to alteration at the conclusion of an investigation now under 
way. 

By the Commission: ' R. O. Self, 

This February 25, 1921. Clerk. 



BEFORE THE CORPORATION COMMISSION— IN THE MATTER OF THE 
PETITION OF THE CITIZENS LIGHT AND POWER COMPANY, OF LE- 
NOIR, FOR INCREASE IN ELECTRIC LIGHT AND POWER RATES IN 
THE TOWN OF LENOIR, N. C. 

After due consideration of the evidence presented on December 6, 1920, in con- 
nection with the above application of the above named petition, the Commission is 
unable to find sufficient cause to change the schedule of rates set forth in its temporary 
order of August 26, 1920. Therefore it is 

Ordered, That the Citizens Light and Power Company is hereby authorized to 
continue to charge for electric lighting and power in the town of Lenoir the rate 
promulgated in the Commission's temporary order of August 26, 1920, until further 
ordered. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 28th day of February, 1921. Clerk. 



24 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

BEFORE THE NORTH CAROLINA CORPORATION COMMISSION— IN RE 
APPLICATION OF THE CITIZENS LIGHT AND POWER COMPANY, OF 
LENOIR, N. C. 

Exceptions having been filed by the city of Lenoir to the order of the Commission 
heretofore entered in this proceeding, and dated Feb. 28, 1921, upon reconsideration 
thereof and of the record in the proceeding, it is held and adjudged that the excep- 
tions are not sustained by the record, therefore it is 

Ordered, That the exceptions be, and they are hereby, overruled. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This March 16th, 1921. Clerk. 



THE CORPORATION COMMISSION v. THE PULLMAN COMPANY. 

This is an ex parte case, the Corporation Commission having on its own motion, 
by correspondence, taken up the question of Pullman berth rates between Raleigh 
and Wilmington, North Carolina, and intermediate points. 

The defendents are now charging for a lower berth between Raleigh and Wilming- 
ton a rate of $4.05, including surcharge and war tax, which also applies between in- 
termediate points and Wilmington, including Goldsboro. The distance between 
Raleigh and Wilmington is 133 miles and between Goldsboro and Wilmington 84 
miles. The position of the Commission is that the rate is unreasonably high and 
that it is discriminatory compared with Pullman service in other directions when 
considering distances, which is the basic principle for arriving at Pullman rates. 

The present lower berth rate between Raleigh and Greensboro, a distance of 81 
miles, is $3.24, including war tax and surcharge. 

The Pullman Company contends that the Raleigh-Greensboro rate was originally 
established to apply to a through car which would require passengers to disembark 
at 4:00 a. m. at Greensboro; that the service is now strictly a Raleigh-Greensboro 
service, entitling passengers to remain in the car until 7:30 a. m., and that this rate is 
therefore too low and should be $4.05, including surcharge and war tax; moreover, 
they state that if the Raleigh-Wilmington charge is excessive, it is only fair that the 
Pullman Company be understood as collecting only $2.50, the remainder of the charge 
representing surcharge of $1.25 for the railroad company and 8 per cent war tax. 

In view of all the circumstances, the Commission is convinced that the rate is 
both unreasonable and discriminatory, and it is therefore 

Ordered, That the Pullman Company be and they are hereby directed to put in 
effect a rate for lower berth between Raleigh and Wilmington and intermediate points 
via the Southern Railway and between Goldsboro and Wilmington, no higher than 
$3.25, including war tax and surcharge, and upper berth pro rata, the said charge to 
become effective Saturday, March 19, 1922. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

Raleigh, North Carolina, March 7, 1921. Clerk. 



DECISIONS AND ADJUSTMENT OF COMPLAINTS 25 

BEFORE THE NORTH CAROLINA CORPORATION COMMISSION— IN 

THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF THE HOME TELEPHONE 

COMPANY, FOR INCREASE IN TELEPHONE RATES IN THE TOWN 

OF MEBANE, N. C. 

Order 

The Home Telephone Company having made application for increase in telephone 
rates in the town of Mebane and a copy of said application having been submitted 
to the Board of Aldermen of said town, who agreed to the proposed schedule of rates, 
provided the petitioner would make certain improvements, whereupon the petitioner 
filed a proposed plan of improvement upon its system, dependent upon the proposed 
increase, and by this reference the proposed plan for improvements is made a part of 
this order; therefore, it is 

Ordered, That the application be granted, and the said Home Telephone Com- 
pany is hereby authorized to charge the following rates in the town of Mebane, 

effective April 1, 1921: „ ,^ ,, 

^ ' Per Month 

Business, special line $ 3. 50 

Business, duplex 3. 25 

Business, party line 3. 00 

Residence, special line 2. 50 

Residence, duplex 2. 25 

Residence, party line 2. 00 

Country line .75 

(The above rates to be applicable within the exchange base rate area.) 

Subscribers desiring service beyond the exchange base rate area will 
be charged the above rates plus an additional monthly charge per 
quarter mile until beyond the base area as follows: 

Individual lines 42 cents 

2 party line 21 cents 

4 party line 11 cents 

That additional charges may be made for services performed at the 
request of the subscriber, as follows: 
Service Connection Charges: Per Month 

1 . For individual and party line service $ 3. 50 

2. For each extension station connected with any class of 
telephone service 3. 50 

3. To cover in part directory, accounting circuit and 
switchboard expenses in cases where service is estab- 
lished by use of instrumentalities already in place in the 
subscribers premises and no change is made in the type 

or location of such instrumentalities 1.50 

Charges for Moves and Changes : 

1 . For moving telephone set from one location to another 

on the same premises a charge of 3. 00 

2 . For change in type of style of telephone set a charge of- - 3 . 00 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 17th day of March, 1921. Clerk. 



IN RE FIXING OF RATES FOR CONSUMPTION 
OF GAS FOR VARIOUS CITIES. 

Order 

By THE Commission : — On July 29, 1920, this Commission made an order for a 
general increase in gas rates to be charged by the companies furnishing gas in the 



26 N. C. COKPOEATION COMMISSION 

cities of Raleigh, Durham, Goldsboro, New Bern, EKzabeth City, Oxford, Hender- 
son, Charlotte, Washington and Winston-Salem. On August 9, 1920, a similar 
order was made increasing gas rates in Wilmington and Wrightsville Beach. On 
December 13, 1920, a similar order was made with reference to gas rates for 
Greensboro, High Point, Salisbury, Spencer and East Spencer. These orders were 
predicated upon the fact that the gas companies, on account of the peak prices 
charged for everything going into the manufacture of gas, were on the verge of finan- 
cial ruin. At the time the orders were made it was stated that they were but tem- 
porary and that later the Commission would make an extensive investigation and 
give a hearing to all the parties in interest. 

On March 22, 1921, an extensive hearing was entered into in the offices of the 
Commission for the purpose of determining a permanent reasonable rate to be charged 
for gas in the cities in question which would give to the gas companies a fair return 
upon the value of the several properties, as required by law. At this hearing the 
Commission found the following facts: 

1. That under the temporary rates granted none of the gas companies had earned 
more than a fair return for the time in which the rates were in force. 

2. That since the temporary order was made the price of good gas coal at the 
mines has been reduced from an average price of $10.00 to an average price of S3. 50 
per ton. 

3. That since the temporary order was made the price of gas oil had been reduced 
from an average price of 16 cents per gallon to an average price of 11 cents per gallon. 

4. That the price of skilled labor has not been reduced, but the price of common 
labor has been reduced from an average of $4.00 to an average of $2.50 per day. 

The Commission is forced to take judicial notice of the fact that prices generally 
are falling, and this, with the facts found as stated above, compels it, wfth due re- 
gard to the rights of the consuming public, to make a general reduction in rates 
charged for gas in the respective cities by the gas companies furnishing such cities. 

In the temporary orders issued as recited above the consuming public was promised 
that if we found the various gas companies were not entitled to the temporary rate 
given them that we would order them to give to the consumers a rebate representing 
the difference between the rate granted in the temporary order and the rate granted 
in this order. The Commission regrets that for various reasons it will have to re- 
cede from this promise, chief among which reasons are: First, as stated above, it ap- 
peared that even with the excessive temporary rate the gas companies passed through 
such a period of adverse conditions that the rate granted did not afford them more 
than a reasonable return and should we now order a rebate it would be depriving them 
of what they were justly entitled to earn. Second, in order to make this rebate it 
would require an immediate outlay of a large amount of cash, which outlay, in the 
present financial condition of the companies, might mean immediate bankruptcy to 
some of them. 

It is therefore ordered by the Corporation Commission that the following rates be 
charged by the gas companies furnishing gas to the consumers in the following cities : 

Gross Rate per 1,000 Cubic Feet for the First 10,000 Cubic Feet 

Winston-Salem $ 1.95 

Raleigh 1 . 95 

Durham 1.95 

Charlotte 1 . 85 

Wilmington 2 .05 

New Bern 2.35 



DECISIONS AND ADJUSTMENT OF COMPLAINTS 27 

Elizabeth City $ 2.40 

Henderson 2. 50 

Oxford 2 . 50 

Salisbury 2.10 

Spencer 2.10 

East Spencer 2.10 

High Point 2.10 

Greensboro 1.95 

Goldsboro 2.35 

Washington 2. 35 

The gross rate per 1,000 cubic feet for gas consumed per month in ex- 
cess of 10,000 cubic feet and up to 20,000 cubic feet shall be 20 cents 
less than the rate charged above for the first 10,000 cubic feet, and the 
gross rate per 1,000 cubic feet for gas consumed per month in excess of 
20,000 cubic feet shall be 30 cents less than the rate charged above for 
the first 10,000 cubic feet. From the above rates a discount of 5 cents 
per 1,000 cubic feet will be allowed if bill is paid before 5 o'clock p. m. 
on the tenth day from date of rendition of same. 

The charge for gas furnished through prepay meters shall in each 
case be 5 cents less than the gross rates set out above. The minimum 
charge in all cases shall be $1 .50. 

The rates above fixed shall be effective and applicable to April, 1921, 
and subsequent meter readings. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This April 21, 1921. Clerk. 

Maxwell, Commissioner: — I concur in the schedules of rates in the foregoing 
order, except as to the rates for Wilmington, Elizabeth City and Henderson and 
Oxford. I find no justification for the rates for the three latter cities higher than the 
rates named for Goldsboro, New Bern and Washington, and no justification for a 
higher rate for Wilmington than for Raleigh, Durham, Greensboro and Winston- 
Salem. Wilmington has a gas output greater than in any of these cities. It has 
some advantage over them in freight rates on coal and gas oil, and in my opinion its 
rates for gas should not be higher than in the other cities named. 



SUPPLEMENTARY ORDER IN RE "FIXING OF RATES FOR CONSUMP- 
TION OF GAS FOR VARIOUS CITIES" IN THE STATE, ISSUED BY THE 
COMMISSION UNDER DATE OF APRIL 21, 1921. 

Order 

By the Commission : The application of the North Carolina Public Service Com- 
pany for increase in gas rates included the village of Yadkin and adjacent territory, 
in Rowan County, outside of the incorporation of the cities of Salisbury, Spencer 
and East Spencer, which the Commission failed to include in its order of April 21, 
1921, above referred to; therefore, it is 

Ordered, That the gas rates set forth in the Commission's order of April 21, 1921, 
for the cities of Salisbury, Spencer and East Spencer are hereby made applicable to 
the village of Yadkin and adjacent territory, in Rowan County. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 25th day of May, 1921. (^lerk. 



28 N. C. COKPOKATION COMMISSION 

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF THE MUSE TELEPHONE 
COMPANY, INC., FOR INCREASE IN TELEPHONE RATES. 

Order 

Upon receipt of the above-named application the Commission asked the compam' 
for certain information, from which it appears that the company operates rural lines 
for a distance of about 18 miles outside of High Point, N. C, and makes connection 
with the North State Telephone Company, in High Point. 

It appears that the original cost of the company was about five thousand dollars — 
including the purchase price and repairs during the period of reorganization, shortly 
after its purchase; the monthly payroll is about $80.00 and the rental paid to the 
High Point exchange is $40.00 per month, making a total expenditure of $120.00, 
and the income from phone rents is $127.00 per month, therefore it is 

Ordered, That on and after July 1, 1921, the Muse Telephone Company is 
authorized to make a monthly rental charge for telephones as follows: 

Party line phones $ 1.50 

Selective ring phones 2. 00 

By order of the Commission. R. O. Self, 

This April 22, 1921. Clerk. 



IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF THE IREDELL TELEPHONE 
COMPANY FOR INCREASE IN TELEPHONE RATES IN THE CITY OF 
STATESVILLE AND THE VILLAGE OF TROUTMANS. 

Order 

The Commission having received the above-named petition asking for an increase 
of telephone rates of 50 cents per phone, and the said petition having affixed thereto, 
under the seal of the city of Statesville, a copy of an order, dated April 20, 1921, made 
by the board of aldermen of the city of Statesville, endorsing the application for in- 
crease, it is 

Ordered, That the Iredell Telephone Company be, and it is, hereby authorized 
to charge for monthly telephone rental service, effective May 1, 1921, as follows: 

Monthly 

Class Charge 

Business, single line $ 4. 00 

Residence, single line 3. 00 

Residence, duplex 2. 50 

Residence, four-party line 2. 00 

Business, extension set 1.00 

Residence, extension set .75 

Rural line phones (not to exceed 8 phones to the line 4.00 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This April 22, 1921. Clerk. 



i IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION OF THE LOUISVILLE AND NASH- 
VILLE RAILROAD COMPANY TO DISCONTINUE ITS AGENCY AT 
RANGER, CHEROKEE COUNTY. 

The above petition having been received, with the verified statements of receipts 
and disbursements at said station of Ranger for a period of six months, and it ap- 



DECISIONS AND ADJUSTMENT OF COMPLAINTS 29 

pearing therefrom that said receipts were not sufficient to warrant the retention of 

an agent at that point, under the present wage scale for such agency, it is 

Ordered, That the Louisville and Nashville Railroad Company be and it hereby is 

authorized to discontinue the agency at that point and provide in lieu of said agency 

service a care-taker for the said station. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 3d day of May, 1921. Clerk. 



CORPORATION COMMISSION v. AMERICAN RAILWAY EXPRESS 
COMPANY, SOUTHEASTERN EXPRESS COMPANY. 

The Commission has received joint special supplements to current traffic of the 
American Railway Express Company authorizing the rules and regulations contained 
in said tariffs to apply locally and jointly over the lines of the Southeastern Express 
Company in connection with the other express companies of the United States, in- 
cluding the American Railway Express Company. 

The special supplement contains the following note under the head of "Routing": 
''Shipments destined to offices reached by both the American Railway Express 
Company and the Southeastern Express Company shall be forwarded by the com- 
pany receiving same from the shipper, over its own lines to destination." 

This routing is objectionable from the standpoint of the shipping public for the 
obvious reasons that it limits the movement of traffic to the single company to 
which it is delivered for transportation regardless of the fact that there may be a 
more expeditious route by using joint routes with both the companies. Moreover, 
this routing rule if literally applied, would result in the expeditious route, if used, 
requiring a greater charge or a combination of the locals of each of the companies in- 
stead of a single graduated charge or rate as heretofore used by one company. 

In the interest of the shipping public, it is therefore 

Ordered, That the American Railway Express Company and the Southeastern 
Express Company be and they are hereby directed to handle all intrastate express 
shipments over the most expeditious routes, and to disregard on intrastate traffic in 
North Carolina the routing rule shown in special supplement issued by the American 
Railway Express Company for account of its own line and that of the Southeastern 
Express Company, April 20, 1921, effective May 1, 1921, and shown on pages 2, 3 
and 5 thereof, and to charge and collect upon such traffic, revenue based upon rates, 
rules and regulations contained in said tariffs of the American Railway Express 
Company for local and joint hauls the same as if moving over and upon the lines of 
one company, it is further 

Ordered, That this order be and is hereby made effective from and after the 
first day of May, nineteen hundred and twenty-one. 

By order of the Commission: 

This May 4, 1921. Chairman. 



IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF THE HOME TELEPHONE 
AND TELEGRAPH COMPANY FOR INCREASE IN TELEPHONE RATES 
ON THE ROANOKE RAPIDS, N. C, EXCHANGE. 

Application of the above-named company for increase in telephone rates in the 
town of Roanoke Rapids and rural lines connected with that exchange having been 



30 X. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

received and the said application having attached thereto a copy of a resolution 
passed by the board of commissioners of the town of Roanoke Rapids, signed by 
the clerk, and bearing date of June 18, 1920, and appearing to have been certified 
by the said clerk under date of April 6, 1921, approving the said increase upon con- 
dition that free service be given between the towns of Roanoke Rapids and Weldon, 
therefore, it is 

Ordered, That the Home Telephone and Telegraph Company is hereby author- 
ized to charge for the following specified classes of 'phone service in the town of 
Roanoke Rapids and rural farmers' line service connected with its exchange in the 
said town, effective June 1, 1921, the following monthly rates: 

Monthly 
Class Rate 

Business, special line $ 3. 75 

Business, duplex line 3. 25 

Residence, special line 2. 50 

Residence, duplex line 2. 00 

(The above rates to be charged within the exchange radius. Sub- 
cribers desiring service beyond the exchange radius will be charged the 
same rate plus an additional annual charge of $5.00 per quarter mile or 
fraction thereof per circuit.) 
Farmers' line service $ 3. 75 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 16th day of May, 1921. Clerk. 



IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION OF THE HOME TELEPHONE AND 
TELEGRAPH COMPANY FOR INCREASE IN TELEPHONE RATES IN 
THE CITY OF WELDON, N. C. 

The above-named application having been received, with a copy of a resolution 
passed by the board of mayor and commissioners of the city of Weldon attached 
thereto setting forth "that it is the sense of the board of mayor and commissioners 
of the city of Weldon that the said Home Telephone Company should be permitted 
to increase its rates as follows: 

Business, special line service from $3. 00 to $3. 75 

Business, duplex line service from 2.50 to 3.25 

Residence, special line service from 2 . 00 to 2 . 50 

Residence, duplex hne service from 1.50 to 2. 00 

"The unlimited free service between Weldon and Roanoke Rapids is to be con- 
tinued in full force and effect;" 

And the resolution further setting forth that no objection would be made to this 
increase "Provided the Corporation Commission, upon investigation, so decides 
that the proposed rates are just and don't secure a larger return on the money in- 
vested in the city of Weldon than is deserved," has been considered and some effort 
has been made to ascertain the earnings of the company in the city of Weldon, 
which has been found hard to do because prior to January 1, 1921, the property 
account of the Weldon exchange and the Roanoke Rapids exchange were carried in 
one account and the investment and operating charges at both exchanges were also 
carried in one account, but it appears that on the date referred to above the company 
made an inventory and appraisal of its property accounts and separated the two ex- 
changes and since that time has kept the records so as to show the return on the in- 



DECISIONS AND ADJUSTMENT OF COMPLAINTS 43 

Upon further investigation into the matter, we find that there are regularly- 
established businesses on Wrightsville Beach, other than seasonal business, that 
would give value to the service at the Wrightsville Beach exchange independent of 
the Wilmington service, and that the rates of the Wrightsville Beach exchange, for 
year-round service, have been upon a considerably higher basis than for other ex- 
changes of like size, upon consideration of the free use of the Wilmington line, and 
finding that these rates were made for and intended to cover the use of the Wilming- 
ton lines, such service is not a free service, and it is 

Ordered, That so much of our order of May 31, 1921, as authorized a toll charge 
between Wrightsville and Wilmington is hereby rescinded. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 11th dav of June, 1921. Clerk. 



IN RE EXTENSION OF LIMITS FOR FREE DELIVERY OF EXPRESS AND 
TELEGRAPH MESSAGES AND TO EXTEND THE BASE RATE AREA 
FOR CITY RATES FOR TELEPHONE SERVICE TO WEST RALEIGH. 

By the Commission : The section of Raleigh known as Cameron Park and extend- 
ing to and including the State A. & E. College has developed into a compact part of 
the city of Raleigh with no intervening section undeveloped, and in the opinion of 
the Commission is entitled to free delivery service of public service companies. It is 

Ordered, That the Western Union Telegraph Company, the Postal Telegraph 
Company, the American Railway Express Company and the Southeastern Express 
Company, within ten days from date, amend their limits for free delivery service to 
conform to the following boundaries in West Raleigh, and including both sides of 
the streets named: 

Beginning at a point where Park Drive touches the present city delivery limits 
and runs west with Park Drive to Oberlin Road, thence with Oberhn Road to Shep- 
hard's East Alley, thence with the alley to Shephard's Street, thence with Shep- 
hard's Street to Hillsboro Street, thence south, so as to include the A. & E. College, 
to the railway right of way in an easterly direction to the present city delivery 
hmits, thence to the beginning. It is 

Further ordered. That the Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company 
amend its schedule of charges to its patrons within the territory covered in the fore- 
going description so as to eliminate the additional charge of 42 cents per month for 
each quarter of mile of additional distance beyond the old city limits, and present 
base rate area, applicable to its bills rendered for June service, and thereafter. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 14th day of June, 1921. C^erk. 



IN RE APPLICATION FOR INCREASE OF STREET CAR 
RATES IN CONCORD. 

Order 

By the Commission : The petition in this case and the evidence submitted exhibit 
a distressing situation. With the general tendency downward in prices the general 
public naturally expects reductions rather than increases in rates to public utilities. 
But strange to say there is absolutely no reduction worth considering in the matter 



44 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

of operating expenses of the company operating the street railway in Concord. The 
only reductions noted are for common labor and a few such small items as copper wire, 
which do not amount to five per cent of the operating and maintenance costs. It is 
next to impossible to reduce wages, for the operating company has never paid war- 
time wages and there is no margin to go upon. The life of this street-car line is so 
essential to the prosperity of the city of Concord that we are compelled to keep it 
alive notwithstanding the protests of those who have not upon their shoulders the 
responsibility that rests upon this Commission. 

The question resolves itself into this: Shall we allow the company operating the 
street cars in Concord to tear up its tracks or shall we still experiment on a higher 
rate so as to give the public of Concord another chance at retaining them? The well- 
to-do citizen owns his automobile and is not dependent upon the street cars, but the 
poor man is. The street car is often called the "poor man's automobile. " We dare 
not order the tearing up of the street-car tracks until we have exhausted every avenue 
of escape therefrom. The company operating the cars actually lost $5,059.00 in the 
year ending March 31, 1920, and $5,502.00 in the year ending March 31, 1921. Our 
oath of office requires us as a Commission to follow the law. The law says that we 
must give every public utility a fair return upon the value of its property. There is 
no possible chance for us to give the company such a return in Concord, for at a rate 
that would produce such a return the people would not ride. The company is now 
charging an eight cent rate and is losing money. We have decided to allow it to 
charge ten cents. Therefore it is 

Ordered, That the Salisbury and Spencer Railway Company be allowed to charge 
a rate of ten cents on its street-car line in the city of Concord and that it make to this 
Commission quarterly reports of its operating revenues and expenses for the next 
ensuing year. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This June 15, 1921. C^^^k. 



IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF THE ALBEMARLE TELE- 
PHONE AND ELECTRIC COMPANY, INC., FOR INCREASE IN TELE- 
PHONE RATES IN COLUMBIA, ROPER AND ADJACENT TERRITORY. 

Order 

By the Commission : The above-named application having been received and a 
copy of same having been served upon the mayor of the town of Columbia, with re- 
quest that answer be filed within ten days after date of notice, and that time having 
long since expired and no communication from the said mayor having been received, 
therefore, it is 

Ordered, That the Albemarle Telephone and Electric Company be, and it is 
hereby, authorized to charge for monthly telephone rental service, effective July 1, 
1921, as follows: 

Within the Towns of Columbia and Roper 

Monthly 
Class Rate 

Business, one party $ 2. 50 

Business, more than one party 2. 00 

Residence, one party 2. 00 

Residence more than one party, 1.50 



DECISIONS AND ADJUSTMENT OF COMPLAINTS 65 

mote, and can only be promoted to the greatest advantage when our utilities are 
required to render adequate service and the public is required to pay reasonable 
rates for such service. 

Demands are now being made for extension of service and the company must 
plan in a comprehensive way to meet such demands. The developments and growth 
of any business or industry require capital, and financing must, of necessity, precede 
construction. Money is a commodity of world-wide demand, and seeks the market 
affording the safest and highest returns. In addition to this return, reasonable 
safety of investment is demanded. 

Under its present rates this company has been unable to accumulate any working 
capital and it now finds additional capital necessary to provide for needed improve- 
ments, and the capital required cannot be secured at the present time unless the 
investing public is assured that rates will be authorized which will insure safety of 
investment and continuity of returns; therefore, it is 

Ordered, (1) That the application for increased rates under present service con- 
ditions be denied; 

(2) That the petitioner be and is hereby required to make such improvements 
prior to January 1, 1922, as are needed to put its plant in condition to render the re- 
quired standard under the Commission's rules, and it is 

Further ordered. That when the above requirements have been fully complied 
with, the Asheville Power and Light Company be and is hereby authorized to charge 
the following rates in the city of Asheville: 

For the first 10,000 cubic feet $2 . 30 per M. cu. ft. 

Forthenext 10,000 cubic feet 2.10 per M. cu. ft. 

All over 20,000 cubic feet 2.00 per M. cu. ft. 

From the above named rates a discount of 10 cents per M. cubic feet shall be 
allowed for the payment of bills paid on or before 5 o'clock p. m., on the tenth day 
from the date of rendition. The minimum charge in all cases shall be $1.50. 
By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 17th day of August, 1921. Clerk. 



NORTH CAROLINA CORPORATION COMMISSION — IN RE APPLICA- 
TION OF THE ASHEVILLE POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY FOR 
AUTHORITY TO INCREASE GAS RATES IN THE CITY OF ASHE- 
VILLE. 

In the above entitled cause, the Corporation Commission did, on the 17th day of 
August, 1921, issue an order prescribing for the Asheville Power and Light Company 
a schedule of rates for the sale of gas in the city of Asheville. Within the time 
allowed by law, exceptions to the findings in the said order and to the order itself 
were filed by the city of Asheville, respondent. 

The Corporation Commission having considered the exceptions of the respondent, 
and deeming them without merit, hereby overrules same, thereby leaving the original 
order in full force and effect. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 7th day of September, 1921. Clerk. 



66 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

IN RE PETITION OF THE ASHEVILLE POWER AND LIGHT COM- 
PANY FOR AUTHORITY TO INCREASE GAS RATES IN THE CITY OF 
ASHEVILLE. 

Order Supplementary to Order Issued by the Commission 
On the 17th Day of August, 1921. 

Upon petition of the Asheville Power and Light Company setting forth the 
reasons why it is unable to comply with the order of the Commission referred to 
above, in regard to completing certain improvements on or before January 1, 1922. 

It is ordered. That the time to complete the improvements to petitioner's gas 
plant and mains and the time for the increased rate to be charged by the petitioner 
for gas in the city of Asheville be extended from January 1, 1922, to April 1, 1922. 

That a copy of this order be mailed to the mayor of the city of Asheville, the clerk 
of the court of the county of Madison and to the attorney for petitioner. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 21st day of December, 1921. Clerk. 



ORDER SUPPLEMENTAL TO THE COMMISSION'S ORDER OF JUNE 30, 
1920, GRANTING AN INCREASE TO THE INTERSTATE TELEPHONE 
AND TELEGRAPH COMPANY, IN THE CITY OF DURHAM. 

At the time the order referred to above was written the Commission inadvertently 
overlooked a portion of the company's application, which asked for a rate on a 
business residence duplex telephone carrying two special line circuits; therefore 

It is ordered. That the Commission's order of June 30, 1920, be amended by add- 
ing after residence extension rate the following: 

''Business-residence duplex to take the same rate as two special lines, where two 
cable pairs are used. " 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 2d day of September, 1921. C^erk. 



BURNSVILLE ELECTRIC COMPANY having filed with the Commission a 
schedule of rates to be charged for the sale of electricity for lighting and power in 
the town of Burnsville, N. C, and the Commission having had same under con- 
sideration, it is 

Ordered, subject to complaint and hearing, that the Burnsville Electric Company 
be and is hereby authorized to charge in the town of Burnsville and adjacent ter- 
ritory the following rates, for the classes of service specified herein: 

For each dwelling, store, office or other building a minimum rate of 
$1 .50 shall be charged and where the customer uses more than 10 kilo- 
watts, then 15 cents for each k.w.h. over 10 kilowatts shall be charged. 

When more than one customer or user is located in a building this 
rate shall apply to each customer or user in the building. 

Power in the Home: 

For cooking, washing, etc 8 cents per k.w.h. 

Power for Other Purposes: 

To customers using the following horsepower the following rates shall 

apply: 



DECISIONS AND ADJUSTMENT OF COMPLAINTS 67 

Five to ten horsepower 8 cents per k.w.h. 

Ten to twenty horsepower 6 cents per k.w.h. 

Twenty to forty horsepower 4 cents per k.w.h. 

Forty to fifty horsepower 3 cents per k.w.h. 

Fifty to seventy-five horsepower 2 cents per k.w.h. 

Seventy-five to one hundred horsepower 1^ cents per k.w.h. 

Over one hundred horsepower 13^ cents per k.w.h. 

The above to be retail rates. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This September 2, 1921. C'^^^^- 



TOWN OF WINDSOR v. WELLINGTON AND POWELLSVILLE R. R. CO. 

This is a complaint of the town of Windsor seeking to have the Wellington and 
Powellsville Railroad Company install a side track in the town of Windsor for use of 
the municipal light plant which is owned and operated by the town. 

At the hearing at Raleigh on the 27th of October, 1921, the town of Windsor was 
represented by Mr. J. W. Davenport of the firm of Gillam and Davenport, attorneys, 
and Mayor Pritchard. The Wellington and Powellsville Railroad Company was 
represented by Mr. A. T. Baker, president. 

It appeared that a year or more ago the town of Windsor made application to the 
railroad for a siding and was informed by Mr. Baker that he would put the siding in 
if the town would do the grading and at the time pointed out where the track should 
be graded. The town went ahead and graded the track in accordance with the under- 
standing with Mr. Baker at a cost to the town of $174.00 and although the town had 
constantly been promised by Mr. Baker that the track would be installed he had 
failed to do so. Cars of coal for the light plant are continually arriving and the coal 
has to be drayed. The revenue to the Wellington and Powellsville Railroad Com- 
pany from the coal shipments amounts to at least $720.00 per annum. 

President Baker stated that while he did promise the siding and did point out the 
place for the town to grade the same, he had not been financially able to put the sid- 
ing in; moreover, that he had concluded that the grade made by the town would not 
do; that the grade was made at the wrong place although he did not deny that it was 
graded as per his own suggestion. It is therefore 

Ordered, That the Wellington and Powellsville Railroad Company be and they 
are hereby directed to install a side track to the municipal light plant in the town 
of Windsor within fifteen days, dating from October 27, 1921, on the following 
basis : 

The track to be constructed by the Wellington and Powellsville Railroad Company. 
The town of Windsor to pay for, own and maintain that part of the track 194 feet in 
length measuring from the end of the siding at the plant, less the cost of any grading 
that may be necessary by reason of change in location of track, it being found and 
held by the Commission that, as the town of Windsor has already graded for the 
track on a location proposed by the Wellington and Powellsville Railroad Company, 
the town should not be required to pay for grading another location if the railroad 
company now finds it necessary to use another location. The Wellington and Pow- 
ellsville Railroad Company is also to bear the cost and maintenance of the switch 
and track other than the 194 feet measuring from the plant end of the track. 



68 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

It is further ordered, That the town of Windsor be allowed, if desired by them, 
to furnish the ties for that part of track to be owned by the town, the said ties to be 
subject to inspection and approval by the railroad company. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This November 1, 1921. Clerk. 



IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION OF THE NORFOLK AND CARO- 
LINA TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH COMPANY IN RE TELEPHONE 
RATES IN EDENTON AND HERTFORD, N. C— BEFORE THE COM- 
MISSION. 

Application having been made by the petitioner in the above-entitled case on 
January 13, 1921, to reduce in the town of Edenton the residence duplex telephone 
rate 25 cents and increase the residence single line telephone rates 25 cents, 
notice was served upon the mayor of the town of Edenton on February 16, 1921, 
who advised that town council had refused this request once and that he would 
like to present the notice to the council at its meeting on March 8, 1921. On March 
10th, the Commission was advised by the town clerk that a hearing was desired 
provided the telephone company desired to be heard. Hearing was set for Novem- 
ber 9, 1921, at 10 a.m., and all parties to the case duly notified under date of October 
26, 1921. Mr. C. W. Grice, general manager, appeared for the telephone company 
and no appearance was made for the city, therefore, it is 

Ordered, That the Norfolk and Carolina Telephone Company is hereby author- 
ized to charge for residence duplex telephone service in the town of Edenton $1.50 
per month, and for residence single line service $2.25 per month, and it is 

Further ordered, by virtue of an agreement, copy of which is on file in this 
office, between the said telephone company and the town of Hertford that when 
the company has complied with the agreement, by installing certain improved 
equipment, the said company is authorized to charge in the said town of Hertford, 
in addition to the rates now authorized, the sum of 25 cents on each phone installed 
and operated from the Hertford Exchange. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This November 9, 1921. Clerk. 



BEFORE THE CORPORATION COMMISSION— IN THE MATTER OF 
FREIGHT RATES ON CRUSHED STONE, GRAVEL AND SAND, CAR- 
LOAD, BETWEEN POINTS IN NORTH CAROLINA. 

Harris Granite Quarries Company, Neverson Granite Company, Inc., North 
Carolina Granite Corporation, Collins Company, Inc., Valentine and Com- 
pany, AGAINST Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Co., Carolina and North- 
western Railway Co., Carolina, Clinchfield and Ohio Ry. Co., Norfolk 
AND Western Railroad Company, Norfolk Southern Railroad Company, 
Seaboard Air Line Railway Company, Southern Railway Company, 
Winston-Salem Southbound Railway Co. 

Order 

A hearing in the above matter was held on November 7, 1921. The case for the 
complainants was presented by Mr. Robert Lacy of the Neverson Quarries, Mr. E. 



DECISIONS AND ADJUSTMENT OF COMPLAINTS 69 

D. McCall of the Harris Granite Quarries Company, and Mr. John A. Royal of the 
Standard Sand and Gravel Company. Other shippers participating in the discussion 
were Mr. Frank Page, State Highway Commission, Mr. W. T. Ragland of the Raleigh 
Granite Company and Mr. S. O. Bauersfelt of W. R. Bonsai Company. The car- 
riers were represented as follows: 

Southern Railway, by Mr. W. F. Jones, Commerce Agent, and Mr. H. L. Walker, 
Commerce Counsel; 

Seaboard Air Line Railway, by Mr. T. T. Masengill, A.G.F.A.; 
Atlantic Coast Line, by Mr. J. W. Perrin, A.F.T.M.; 
Norfolk Southern Railroad, by Mr. J. F. Dalton, G.F.A.; 
Winston-Salem Southbound, by Mr. S. P. Collier, T.M. 

The complainants alleged that the present rates on crushed stone, sand and gravel 
between points in North Carolina are so high that they are preventing the free move- 
ment of these commodities which are in great demand at this time for construction 
work; that on account of the consequent curtailment of the output of their manu- 
facturing plants their operations are unprofitable and that therefore it would be only 
a matter of time when their plants must be closed down permanently. 

Complainants claimed these conditions are the direct result of high rates, and to 
substantiate this contention cited the fact of the establishment of numerous portable 
roadside quarries by contractors for the utilization of local stone, also the dredging 
of adjacent streams for sand, thereby not only depriving the large established manu- 
facturing plants of the business but also depriving the carriers of a large volume of 
traffic which they have heretofore enjoyed. 

Complainants further alleged that the present rates are not only too high but that 
there are certain specific rates which are not upon the normal mileage basis and 
which are, therefore, unfair to all concerned; moreover, that the rates on these com- 
modities between points in North Carolina in their present form are more or less 
complicated, and asked the Commission to establish uniform mileage scale for both 
single and joint movements in this State. Complainants submitted a suggested 
scale to apply on stone and gravel and also a scale for sand. 

The carriers contended that the slump in the stone business as referred to by the 
complainants was not unlike the conditions existing in other lines of business and 
presented statistics tending to show favorable comparison in the movement of these 
commodities over the lines of one of the important carriers. While they admitted 
the rates might need some adjustment they opposed a general reduction principally 
upon the ground that the carriers could not afford it in the face of the continued 
high cost of operation. 

Previous to this hearing, in response to insistent informal complaints, the carriers 
some time ago submitted to this Commission a proposed revised scale of rates on 
stone, gravel and sand which were, in some respects, more satisfactory than the 
present rates, but which did not meet the views of the shippers. 

The carriers offer at this time a compromise scale which they state is now before 
the Georgia Railroad Commission for adoption in that state and which they hope to 
have adopted in other states through which they operate. 

The Commission having fully considered the matter finds that the present rates on 
crushed stone and gravel in North Carolina were built up upon basis of 40 per cent 
less than Class L, under the Commission's exception sheet in effect, plus the 
increases of 20 cents per ton under General Order No. 28, and 25 per cent under Ex 
Parte 74. The present sand rates like those on stone and gravel are likewise the 



70 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

old commodity rates of the Corporation Commission with the increases made dur- 
ing Federal control. 

In the decision of the Interstate Commerce Commission in Ex Parte 74, 58-1. C.C. 
250-251, it is stated: 

"The Director General increased rates on sand, gravel and stone by specific 
amounts. 

''Shippers of these commodities contend that 1 cent increase made by the Director 
General averaged much more than 25 per cent, and that to apply to the present 
rates the percentage increases proposed by the carriers will produce rates so high 
as to materially restrict the movement. 

"We are not convinced that exceptions should be made at this time from the per- 
centages approved for traffic generally. 

"The carriers have indicated a willingness to promptly readjust rates in cases 
where the hardship results from the general percentage increases and their special 
attention is called to these commodities to the end that such action may be taken as 
the facts may seem to warrant. " 

While this Commission approved the increase on stone, gravel and sand in like 
manner and to the same extent as the. Interstate Commerce Commission, we are 
convinced at this time that there is merit in the contentions of the complainants in 
this case, and that the carriers themselves are suffering the loss of profitable traffic 
by reason of the use by contractors of local stone and sand which is, generally, of 
inferior quality, the net result being a loss of business to the established crushing 
plants, a loss of traffic to the carriers, with little or no profit to the contractors, and 
withal the use of inferior material in construction work. 

The Commission is of the opinion this condition may and should be remedied by 
a downward revision of rates on these commodities which will do justice to all con- 
cerned, and at the same time relieve in some measure the hardship to business com- 
plained of. It is the further opinion of the Commission that the scale offered by 
the carriers would not, if adopted, afford the relief which the present conditions ap- 
pear to warrant, and on the other hand, the Commission is of the opinion that con- 
ditions, at this time, would hardly justify the adoption of so low a scale as suggested 
by the complainants. 

There was some contention that there should be a difference in the rates on stone 
and gravel versus sand. Upon the record the Commission is of the opinion, and so 
finds, that the rates on stone, gravel and sand should be the same. 

It is, therefore. 

Ordered, That defendant carriers be and they are hereby directed to put in 
force on and after December 15, 1921, the scales of rates for single and joint appli- 
cation between points in this State located on defendant carriers' lines as set forth in 
Appendix Circular No. 224, attached hereto. It is 

Further ordered. That the carriers make these scales of rates supersede the 
rates now in effect on crushed stone, gravel and sand between points in this State, 
except that where specific commodity rates, which are lower than rates which may 
be made by the use of these scales, are now in effect, carriers are directed to take the 
matter up with the Corporation Commission before canceling same. 

Nothing in this order is to be construed as changing or in any way affecting the 
rates now in force on gravel and sand from Royal, N. C, which were made effective 
during Federal control of the carriers. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 25th day of November, 1921. C'ZerA:. 



DECISIONS AND ADJUSTMENT OF COMPLAINTS 



71 



Circular No. 224. (Effective December 15, 1921.) Cancels Circular No. 223. 

RATES ON MARBLE, GRANITE AND STONE (CRUSHED OR RUBBLE), 
STONE SCREENINGS, GRAVEL (WASHED) AND SAND, IN STRAIGHT 
OR MIXED CARLOADS, CARLOAD MINIMUM 60,000 POUNDS, EXCEPT 
ACTUAL WEIGHT WILL APPLY WHERE CAR IS LOADED TO FULL 
VISIBLE CAPACITY, PER TON OF 2,000 POUNDS. 



Distance 


Rate 
Single 
Line 


Rate 
Joint 
Haul 


Distance 


Rate 
Single 
Line 


Rate 
Joint 
Haul 


5 miles and under 


50 
57 
60 
63 
66 
70 
73 
76 
80 
83 
86 
89 
93 
96 
99 
102 
105 
109 
112 
115 
118 
121 
124 
127 
130 


70 
77 
80 
83 
86 
90 
93 
96 
100 
103 
106 
109 
113 
116 
119 
122 
125 
129 
132 
135 
135 
136 
139 
142 
145 


160 miles and over 150 


132 
134 
136 
138 
140 
142 
144 
146 
148 
150 
152 
154 
156 
158 
160 
162 
164 
166 
168 
170 
172 
174 
176 
178 
180 


147 


10 " " over 5.. .. . . 


170 " " 

180 " 

190 " 

200 " 

210 " 

220 " 

230 " 

240 " " ' 

250 " 

260 " " ' 

270 " 

280 " " ' 

290 " 

300 " 

310 " " ' 

320 " 

330 " " ' 

340 " 

350 " 

360 

370 " " ' 

380 " 

390 " 

400 " " 


' 160 


149 


15 " " " 10 

20 15 


' 170 

' 180 . . 


151 
153 


25 •' " " 20 

30 ' 25 

35 " " " 30 

40 " " " 35 

45 " " " 40 

50 " " " 45 

55 " " " 50 

60 55 

65 " " " 60 


' 190 

' 200 

' 210 

' 220 

' 230 

' 240 

' 250 

' 260 

' 270 

' 280 


155 
155 
155 
156 
158 
160 
162 
164 
166 


70 " " " 65 


168 


75 " " " 70 

80 " " " 75 

85 80 

90 " " " 85 

95 90 

100 " " " 95 


' 290 

* 300 

' 310 

' 320 

' 330 

' 340 

' 350 

' 360 

' 370 

' 380 

' 390 


170 
172 
174 
176 
178 
180 


110 ' 100 

120 " " " 110 


182 
184 


130 ' 120 

140 " " " 130 

150 " " " 140 


186 
188 
190 



These rates apply between all points in North Carolina on the lines of the Atlantic 
Coast Line, Southern Railway, Seaboard Air Line, Norfolk Southern Railroad, 
Norfolk and Western Railway, CaroHna, Clinchfield and Ohio Railway, Carolina 
and Northwestern Railway, and Winston-Salem Southbound Railway, except where 
other specific rates are approved by the Commission. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

November 25, 1921. C'^^^^- 



IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION OF THE PIEDMONT POWER AND 
LIGHT COMPANY TO HAVE ITS RATES FOR ELECTRIC POWER 
ESTABLISHED BY THE CORPORATION COMMISSION. 

Order 

The Commission having considered the affidavit of the Piedmont Power and 
Light Company and the certified copies of the ordinances of the Board of Commis- 
sioners of the town of Graham, passed July 1, 1918, and the town of Burlington, 
passed September 2, 1916, and the town of Mebane, passed September 2, 1918, 
whereby the said towns agree that the aforesaid power company, having first ob- 
tained the consent of a majority of its power consumers, may charge for power 
within the said corporate limits, effective June 1, 1918, the following rates: 



72 N. C. CORPOKATION COMMISSION 

For the first 20 kilowatt hours consumed per month 

of each horsepower connected 5 cents per kilowatt hour 

For the next 1000 kilowatt hours per month consumed. -4J^ cents per kilowatt hour 
For the next 1000 kilowatt hours consumed per month. _3 cents per kilowatt hour 
For any consumption in excess of the above quantity 2 cents per kilowatt hour 

It is therefore ordered, That the above rates are hereby approved, subject to 
complaint of any consumer or other interested party and further order. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This November 26, 1921. Clerk. 



I 



IN THE MATTER OF RATES FOR GAS OF THE CONCORD KANNAPOLIS 

GAS COMPANY. 

Order 

Hearing was had on November 23, 1921, on the petition of the Concord and Kan- 
napolis Gas Company for authority to increase rates charged by it for gas. 

It appears that the gas company has been through receivership and the property 
bought in by principal holders of the bonds of the company; that it was operated 
under rates authorized by the board of aldermen of Concord at a very slight show- 
ing of profit above operating expenses until February of this year; that for each 
month since January of this year it has shown an operating deficit, which for the 
seven months to September first totals $3,276.00, without any allowance for return 
on the investment; that there is no complaint of the character of its service, which 
according to the testimony is up to the standard approved by the Corporation Com- 
mission; it is therefore 

Ordered, That for meter readings in December, 1921, and until further notice, 
the petitioner is authorized to charge the following schedule of rates, less 10 cents 
per 1,000 feet for payment within the first ten days of the month: 

First 10,000 cubic feet $2 . 50 per 1000 cu. ft. 

Next 10,000 cubic feet 2.30 per 1000 cu. ft. 

All over 20,000 cubic feet 2.20 per 1000 cu. ft. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 1st day of December, 1921. Clerk. 



IN THE MATTER OF RATES FOR GAS OF THE CONCORD 
AND KANNAPOLIS GAS COMPANY. 

Order 

An order having been made by this Commission on the first day of December, 
1921, fixing rates to be charged for gas by the Concord and Kannapolis Gas Com- 
pany, and the said order not having fixed a minimum rate to be charged by the said 
company, and it now appearing that a minimum rate should be fixed, it s therefore 

Ordered, That the Concord and Kannapolis Gas Company is hereby authorized 
to make a minimum charge of one dollar ($1.00) per month per meter. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 9th day of January, 1922. ^^^^^' 



DECISIONS AND ADJUSTMENT OF COMPLAINTS 73 

IN THE MATTER OF REDUCED RATES ON AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS 

AND LIVE STOCK. 

Order 

Whereas, the railroad companies of the United State have issued, under 
authority of the Interstate Commerce Commission, Special Permission No. 56150, 
general tariffs providing for reduct'on of freight rates on agricultural products and 
live stock for an experimental period of six month; and 

Whereas, there has arisen some confusion and some diversity of action as to 
particular railroad lines, in that the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company and 
some other railroad companies operating in the State of North Carolina have 
issued supplemental tariffs providing that said reduction on agricultural products and 
live stock shall not apply "on traffic having origin, destination and entire trans- 
portation within any one of the following states: Georg a, Florida, North Carolina;" 
and 

Whereas, the said supplements excluding shippers between points in the State 
of North Carolina from the benefits of the said reduced rates are understood to have 
been issued for the reason that the North Carolina Corporation Commission, after 
approval of the action of the carriers in publishing tariffs providing for the reduced 
rates on agricultural products and live stock for an experimental period of six months, 
de'chned to contract away in advance its jurisdiction to pass upon the question of 
whether the higher rates on agricultural products and live stock should be restored 
at the end of the six months experimental periods, reserving the right to pass upon 
that question upon its merits at the end of the six months period; and in order that 
there may be no uncertainty as to the legal application of the said reduced rates 
upon all shipments over all railroad lines between points in North Carolina from 
and after January 1, 1922, and until further order, it is 

Ordered, That the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company and all other railroad 
companies doing business in North Carolina issue tariffs within three days, either 
on their own account or through authorized tariff issuing agencies, withdrawing 
and canceling all tariff supplements issued by and on behalf of any such railroad 
lines limiting the application of the said general tariffs providing for reduced rates 
on agricultural products and live stock in so far as said supplements may limit the 
application of said reduced rates on shipments of agricultural products and live stock 
between points in North Carolina, and that the said reduced rates on agricultural 
products and live stock, made generally on interstate shipments, and in some other 
states on intrastate shipments, shall be made effective on all such shipments over all 
railroad fines within the State of North Carolina, effective from and after January 
1, 1922, to the same extent and measure that rates on the said products are reduced 
on interstate shipments, and that the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company and 
all other railroad companies within the State of North Carolina that may have 
collected on any shipments, originating since January first, of agricultural products 
and live stock enumerated in the said tariffs, rates higher than the general basis of 
reduced rates provided for in said tariffs shall make refund, within ten days from the 
date of this order, of any rates collected on such products in excess of the reduced 
rates generaUy authorized by said tariffs. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This January 2, 1922. Clerk. 



74 N. C. COKPORATION COMMISSION 

IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION OF THE TIDE WATER POWER 
COMPANY FOR INCREASE IN STREET CAR FARES. 

Order 

The petitioner, the Tide Water Power Company, has been operating a street rail- 
way service in the city of Wilmington on a cash fare of 7 cents, with 4 tickets for 25 
cents or 17 for one dollar, since June 1, 1918. In November, 1920, petition was 
filed asking authority to charge a cash fare of 10 cents, and this petition has, from 
time to time, been modified until at the present time the petitioner seeks authority 
merely to discontinue the practice of selling tickets at less than the cash fare rate of 
7 cents. At the hearing on January 23, 1922, the petitioner showed that its operat- 
ing receipts for the year 1921 were barely sufficient to pay operating expenses, with 
no allowance for depreciation on its property or return upon the investment. 

Under all the facts and circumstances developed at the hearing, the request seems 
to be a proper one, and the petitioner is authorized, from and after February 1, 1922, 
and until further ordered, to discontinue the sale of tickets at a less rate than the 
cash fare of 7 cents. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 25th day of January, 1922. Clerk. 



IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION OF THE CONCORD TELEPHONE 
COMPANY FOR INCREASE IN RATES. 

The Concord Telephone Company having filed petition for increase in rental rates 
on October 17, 1921, and the mayor of the town of Concord, under date of Novem- 
ber 4, 1921, having been notified of the service of said petition and of the rates asked 
for, and who having advised that the board of aldermen representing said town had 
no desire to contest an increase of 50 cents on business phones and 25 cents on resi- 
dence phones, but reference having been made orally to said petition by certain 
citizens of the town of Concord at a gas rate hearing, January 24, 1922, was named 
as a date on which to hear same, and both the petitioner and the respondents 
having been notified and appearance having been made by the petitioner only, 
therefore, it is 

Ordered, That, on and after March 1, 1922, the Concord Telephone Company is 
hereby authorized to make the following charges for phone rentals: 

Class Monthly Rate 

Business, individual line $ 3. 50 

Business, party line 3. 00 

Residence, individual line 2. 00 

Residence, party line 1.50 

Rural line rates .65 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This January 25, 1922. Clerk. 

RATES APPROVED FOR THE RANDOLPH TELEPHONE COMPANY 

Class Monthly Rate 

Business, single line $ 3. 00 

Business, duplex 2, 75 

Residence, single line 2. 00 

Residence, duplex 1.75 

Party line 1 . 50 



DECISIONS AXD ADJUSTMENT OF COMPLAINTS 75 

Above rates are for common battery equipment; where magneto equipment is 
used rate will be 25 cents per month less. 

Rural phones on lines maintained by users, beyond exchange Umits, shall be 50 
cents per month. 

January 28, 1922. 



IX RE PETITION OF WIXSTOX-SALEM GAS COMPANY. 

By the Commissiox: This is a petition to increase the rate for the consumption 
of gas to be charged by the Winston-Salem Gas Company. 

Since this Commission reduced the rate of this company from $2.30 per thousand 
cubic feet to SI. 95 per thousand it has kept in touch with its financial operations and 
is con\'inced that the cut in the rate was too deep, it having been shown that the 
company is now earning less than 2 per cent on its investment; it is, therefore. 

Ordered, That the Winston-Salem Gas Company be authorized to charge a rate 
of S2.05 per thousand cubic feet, for the first ten thousand feet, observing the present 
shding scale for greater consumption, giving a discoimt of 5 cents per thousand if 
bill is paid within ten days. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This order effective Februarv 1, 1922. Clerk. 



To Whom it May Concern: 

The Southern Power Company having made application to the Commission setting 
forth that in some cases contracts existing between the Southern Power Company 
and its customers on August 1, 1921, do not set forth the maximum amount of energ}^ 
which said company can be required to furnish at any one time and the maximum 
number of kilowatt hours which it can be required to furnish under such contract 
per month, and requesting the Commission to issue a supplemental order to 
make more clear and specific the meaning and intent of the order of the 
Commission dated July S, 1921, so that the rates, terms and conditions set 
forth in said order may be applied to all sales of electricity by said Southern 
Power Company, in the State of Xorth Carolina, from and after August 1, 
1921, without discrimination among the customers of said company and without 
in any way affecting the rights of any party in interest upon the appeal from 
said order now pending in the Superior Court, and that all contracts for the sale 
of electricity existing between the Southern Power Company and its customers 
on the first day of August, 1921, shall remain in full force and effect for the 
remainder of the respective terms thereof, subject only to the modifications set 
out and contained in said order of July 8, 1921, or as modified by said order, which 
modifications shall be deemed to be incorporated in all such contracts from and after 
August 1. 1921; provided that in case any such contracts do not specifically set forth 
the maximum amount of energy which the power company can be required to furnish 
at any one time, and the maximum number of kilowatt hours which the coApany can 
be required to furnish per month, then the amoimt of energy and the number of 
kilowatt hours per month, regularly and normally consumed under such contracts 
prior to August 1, 1921, by the respective customers ^^th whom such contracts exist, 
shall be deemed to be the maximum amount of energy, and the maximum number of 



76 N. C. CORPOKATION COMMISSION 

kilowatt hours per month, which the power company can be required to furnish 
under such contracts, during the remainder of the respective terms thereof, unless 
and until the parties to such existing contracts shall enter into supplemental, or new 
contracts, changing said maximum amount of energy and maximum number of kilo- 
watt hours per month which the company shall be required to furnish to such custom- 
ers; provided further, that any such new or supplemental contract which may be 
entered into, as aforesaid, pending the appeal from said order of the Commission 
shall specifically set forth that it is made and entered into upon the express condition 
that the order of this Commission, dated July 8, 1921, is legal and valid, and that if 
it should be decided by the courts that said order is void the rights of the parties to 
such contract shall be the same as if such contract had not been made. 
Answer is requested within ten days from date of this notice. 
By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This February 1, 1922. Clerk. 



BEFORE THE CORPORATION COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF NORTH 
CAROLINA— IN RE APPLICATION OF SOUTHERN POWER COMPANY 
TO APPROVE SCHEDULE OF RATES. 

Supplemental Order 

The Southern Power Company having requested the Commission to issue a supple- 
mental order herein in order that the original order of the Commission, dated July 
8, 1921, prescribing the rates, terms and conditions to be charged and applied by the 
Southern Power Company in the sale of electricity in the State of North Carolina, 
from and after August 1, 1921, may be accurately applied to all such sales from and 
after said date without discrimination among any of the consumers of said company, 
due notice of said request was given to the interested respondents and answers hav- 
ing been filed by some of them, the matter came on to be heard before the 
Commission in its office in the city of Raleigh, North Carohna, on Tuesday, 
February 28, 1922, at 10 o'clock a. m., pursuant to notice theretofore given the 
parties in interest, and it having been made to appear to the Commission that in 
some cases the Southern Power Company has outstanding contracts for the sale of 
electricity in the State of North Carolina, which were entered into prior to August 
1, 1921, and which do not specifically set forth both the maximum amount of 
energy which said company can be required to furnish at any one time, and the 
maximum number of kilowatt hours which it can be required to furnish per 
month under such contracts; and that in other cases of contracts entered into 
prior to said date the amount of energy which the power company can be required 
to furnish at any one time and the maximum number of kilowatt hours which it 
can be required to furnish per month, as specified in such contracts when originally 
entered into, were disregarded by mutual consent of the power company and the 
respective consumers under such contracts, and an amount of energy or number of 
kilowatt hours substantially in excess of the amount of energy or maximum number 
of kilo waft hours per month so specified was, prior to August 1, 1921, regularly 
delivered by the power company to such respective consumers for their normal 
use and consumption; 

Now, THEREFORE, in Order to make more clear and specific the meaning and intent 
of the order of the Commission, dated July 8, 1921, and in order that the rates, terms 



DECISIONS AND ADJUSTMENT OF COMPLAINTS 77 

and conditions set forth in said order may be applied, without discrimination, to all 
consumers of said Southern Power Company in the State of North Carolina from 
and after August 1, 1921, and without in any way affecting the rights of any party 
in interest upon the appeal from said order now pending in the Superior Court, it is 
ordered that in all cases of contracts existing on August 1, 1921, between the Southern 
Power Company and its customers for the sale of electricity in the State of North 
Carolina, which do not specifically set forth both the maximum amount of energy 
which said power company can be required thereunder to furnish at any one time, 
and the maximum number of kilowatt hours which the power company can be 
required to furnish per month, or in which the amount of energy to be delivered at 
any one time and the maximum number of kilowatt hours to be delivered per month, 
although originally specified, were disregarded by mutual consent of the power com- 
pany and the customer, and an amount of energy or number of kilowatt hours per 
month twenty-five per cent (25%) or more in excess of the maximum amount of 
energy or maximum number of kilowatt hours per month specified in any such con- 
tract was regularly dehvered by the power company to any such customer prior to 
August 1, 1921, for the normal use and consumption of such customers, the amount 
of energy and the number of kilowatt hours per month regularly and normally con- 
sumed under such contracts, prior to August 1, 1921, by the respective customers 
with whom such contracts exist shall be deemed, from and after August 1, 1921, to 
be the maximum amount of energy and the maximum number of kilowatt hours per 
month which the power company can be required to furnish under such contracts 
during the remainder of the respective terms thereof, unless and until the parties 
to such existing contracts shall enter into supplemental or new contracts changing 
said maximum amount of energy and maximum number of kilowatt hours per 
month which the power company can be required to furnish to such customers; 
provided further that any such new or supplemental contract which may be entered 
into, as aforesaid, pending the determination of the appeal from said order of the 
Commission, shall specifically set forth that it is made and entered into upon the 
express condition that the order of the Commission, dated July 8, 1921, is legal 
and valid, and that if it should be decided by the courts that said order is void, the 
right of the parties under such original contract shall be the same as if such new or 
supplemental contract had not been made. 

It is further ordered that, from and after August 1, 1921, the rates, terms and con- 
ditions set forth and contained in said order of the Commission, dated July 8, 1921, 
be applied to the several classes of service named in said order without discrimina- 
tion among the customers of said Southern Power Company receiving said service 
within this State, and that said rates, terms and conditions shall be deemed, from 
and after August 1, 1921, to be incorporated in all contracts for any of the classes of 
service named in said order, existing between the Southern Power Company and its 
customers on August 1, 1921, any of the terms and provisions of said contracts to the 
contrary notwithstanding. 
By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 17th day of March, A. D., 1922. Clerk. 



78 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

IN RE APPLICATION OF THE SOUTHERN POWER COMPANY TO 
APPROVE SCHEDULE OF RATES. 

Order Overruling Exceptions 

Upon consideration of the exceptions filed in this cause by the Proximity Manu- 
facturing Company, Revolution Cotton Mills, Belle-vue Manufacturing Company 
and Eno Cotton Mills, it is 

Ordered, That the exceptions be and they are hereby overruled. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 20th day of March, 1922. Clerk. 



IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF THE NORTH STATE POWER 
COMPANY FOR INCREASE IN RATES. 

Order 

The North State Power Company by its petition seeks authority to increase its 
rates for electric lighting in the towns of Wendell, Faquay Springs, Holly Springs, 
Lillington, Four Oaks, Pine Level, Princeton, Kenly and Micro from 15 cents 
per k.w.h. to 20 cents per k.w.h., with a scale of discounts more favorable to the 
petitioner than a price at the present time in connection with its rate of 15 cents. 
The property used in lighting these towns was formerly owned by the Cumberland 
Railway and Power Company, which went into bankruptcy, after floating a large 
amount of bonds which were a total loss to the investors. The present owners 
bought the property at a receiver's sale for $75,000.00, for the entire holdings of the 
Cumberland Railway and Power Company, which included the street railway prop- 
erty at Fayetteville, and which the evidence shows to have ver^^ little value, and one 
oil engine at Baileys, which was never put into use. The property used in lighting 
the towns in question cost originally more than $75,000.00, and could not be repro- 
duced at this time for that amount. Upon the showing made by the petitioner, it 
would not earn a fair return upon the receiver's sale purchase price of this property 
if authorized to charge a rate of 20 cents per kilowatt hour; but there are many items 
set up in its accounts which we find it necessary to eliminate, nor can we approve the 
relatively heavy expense for overhead management and supervision of these prop- 
erties, and according to an analysis of its accounts we do not find proper grounds 
for granting the petition for a base rate of 20 cents per k.w.h. 

The petitioner is, however, furnishing service in all of the towns which it serves 
under conditions which justify something more than a normal rate for lighting serv- 
ice. The census population of all the 9 towns served by petitioner combined is 
about 5,000. Five of these towns, Kenly, Four Oaks, Pine Level, Princeton and 
Micro, are served with current purchased by petitioner from the Carolina Power 
and Light Company, but none of these towns have direct connection with the trans- 
mission lines of the Carolina Power and Light Company, and the petitioner is sub- 
jected to the expense of owning and maintaining 22 miles of high-tension transmission 
lines of its own to deliver current to the several towns. The towns of Wendell, 
Lillington, Fuquay Springs and Holly Springs are not within reasonable reach of 
the line of any company distributing hydro-electric power, and the current used in 
these towns is produced by crude oil engines, at a cost considerably greater than is 
normally charged for hydro-electric power. Although service is furnished all these 
towns by one company, each town in the group is entitled to rates based upon the 



DECISIONS AND ADJUSTMENT OF COMPLAINTS 85 

consistent with the understanding of the Commission at the time authority was 
given for the temporary suspension of this service, and the Commission does not 
think that the restoration of this service should now be delayed for such hearing. 
The cost of the operation of this sleeping car cannot in any event be very considerable 
and will serve the convenience of the traveling public between these two important 
cities over trains arriving at and leaving Wilmington at unseasonable hours, and it 
is therefore 

Ordered, That the Southern Railway Company and the Atlantic Coast Line 

Railroad Company restore the operation of Pullman sleeping car service between 

Raleigh and Wilmington on Southern Railway trains Nos. 21 and 22 and on Atlantic 

Coast Line Railroad trains Nos. 90 and 91, beginning not later than June 10, 1922. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This June 5, 1922. Clerk. 



The Corporation Commission has today, effective July 1st, reduced the power 
rates of the North State Power Company in the to"wns of Kenly, Four Oaks, Pine 
Level, Princeton, Micro, Lillington, Wendell, Fuquay Springs and Holly Springs 
from — 

Minimum $2.00 per horsepower of motor rating per month, for which an allowance 
of ten k.w.h. per horsepower shall be given: 

Next 500 k.w.h 10 cents 

Next 1000 k.w.h 8 cents 

Next 2000 k.w.h 6 cents 

All over 4 cents 

$2.00 per horsepower of motor rating per month, for which an allowance of 12 
kilowatt hours per horsepower shall be given: 

Next 1000 k.w.h 8 cents used per month 

Next 1000 k.w.h 6 cents used per month 

Next 1000 k.w.h 4 cents used per month 

All in excess 2 cents used per month 

This 29th day of June, 1922. 



IN RE LOCATION OF UNION PASSENGER STATION IN THE CITY OF 

WINSTON-SALEM. 

Order 

By the Commission: On March 24, 1922, a petition was filed with this Com- 
mission, signed by a number of prominent citizens of Winston-Salem, asking that 
the Southern Railway Company, Norfolk and Western Railway Company and 
Winston-Salem Southbound Railroad Company be ordered to desist from erecting 
a union station for that city on what is known as the Wheeler Street site, and 
requesting that a hearing be granted the citizens of Winston-Salem on the question of 
location of the said union station, said petition alleging that the site known as the 
Norfolk and Western site was more desirable from every standpoint. 

In accordance with the request of the petition a hearing was had in the city of 
Winston-Salem on May 16th, at which evidence was taken as to the relative merits 
of the Wheeler Street site and the Norfolk and Western site as a proper location for 
said union station. 



86 N, C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

It was contended by the advocates of the Wheeler Street site that, whereas no- 
bodj^ desired the union station located on such site, it is nevertheless the only available 
site that can be found for such union station, while on the other hand it was contended 
by the advocates of the Norfolk and Western site that this was also an available 
site and, being a mile closer the center of the city, was more accessible. 

This case has brought squarely up to the Commission the question as to whether 
the freight or passenger service is of greater importance to a community. To an old 
city which is finished and which has few industries of any character it might be that 
the passenger service is of greater importance, but to a progressive industrial city 
like Winston-Salem, which has doubled its population and manufacturing output in 
a decade, and which expects to make still greater strides in the future, it is apparent 
that the freight service is of far greater importance. Railroads can be brought 
to freight easier than freight can be brought to the railroads, but passengers can 
go to a railroad easier than the railroad can go to them. 

The presentation of this petition presents to this Commission the question as to 
which is the better site upon which to locate a union station for the city of 
Winston-Salem. Let us comj>are the advantages and disadvantages of the two 
sites: The Wheeler Street site will admit of the Southern and Norfolk and West- 
ern trains heading in. The baggage, mail, express and parcel post will be un- 
loaded on the same level with the baggage, mail and express departments, and will 
be hauled out of the station from the same level without extra elevation of handling 
in the station, thus expediting the handling of the same. This is to be contrasted 
with the arrangement at the proposed Norfolk and Western site where the baggage, 
mail, express and parcel post will be unloaded on a higher level, trucked across 
tracks and then lowered into their respective departments before they can be dis- 
charged from the station. 

There will be absolutely no interference with the management and handling of 
freight trains in and out of the city and on the freight yards of the city, if the station 
is located at Wheeler Street, as there will be if it is located at the Norfolk and West- 
ern site, which will be shown later. 

The topography of the Wheeler Street site lends itself admirably to the develop- 
ment of a large and commodious station for the handling of passengers and all things 
incidental thereto, with excellent opportunities for the separation of the races as 
required by law, and at the same time giving each race equal facilities. It affords 
ample opportunity for expanding and increasing the operating facilities of the rail- 
roads when this becomes necessary. Judging the future by the past rapid growth 
of the city, it is quite evident that expansion will be necessary in the not distant 
future. 

The Wheeler Street site gives six prominent ways of egress and ingress to the 
station as contrasted to one narrow, 35-foot approach to the Norfolk and Western 
site. People from the western portion of the city may go to the station by either 
Third, Fourth or Fifth streets. By using Fifth Street there will be no grade cross- 
ing to the station. People living in the southern part of the city can approach the 
station by either Belews Street or a new boulevard which is in process of construction 
to the extreme southern part of the city. People in the northern part of the city can 
approach the station from a new street also in process of construction. In neither 
of the last three approaches will there be a grade crossing. By using the new boule- 
vard to the southern part of the city or Belews Street, and l)y using the new street 
for those in the northern part of the city, the Wheeler Street site will be closer by a 
mile for the residents of these sections, as was testified to by Mr. Fleshman. By the 



DECISIONS AND ADJUSTMENT OF COMPLAINTS 87 

use of Belews Street and Shallowford Street the Wheeler Street site will be closer to 
the residents of Ardmore and Crafton Heights than the present station site. It will 
be farther for the citizens living in the northwestern portion of the city, but it is in 
evidence that less than twenty per cent of the population of the city live in that 
section and the big majority of them are wealthy and own their own automobiles. 

The vicinity of the Norfolk and Western site is now one of the most congested 
portions of the city, being in the heart of the manufacturing section. The city is 
already confronted with the problem of relieving this congestion and of managing 
the traffic there. To locate the station at Wheeler Street would relieve the con- 
gestion in this rapidly growing industrial part of the city and distribute it over 
the city through six main thoroughfares rather than concentrate it into the already 
congested one. 

It is in evidence that ample parking space for vehicles will be provided at the 
Wheeler Street site without interference with other necessary business traffic, while 
at the Norfolk and Western site there will hardly be as much parking space as there 
is at the present location. It is self-evident that abundant parking space is necessary 
around a railroad station. 

Winston-Salem is primarily an industrial city. The big industries are at present 
grouped along the railroads from First to Tenth streets. For the city to grow and 
prosper these industries must be served with sufficient freight service. The testi- 
mony of the railroad men at the hearing showed that now these industries and 
industry tracks cannot be served more than four hours a day. It appears that the 
location of the station at Wheeler Street will relieve this situation greatly, and will 
in addition release other property that is absolutely necessary for the industries. 
There are many business establishments in the city that do not have their own side 
tracks. To accommodate these industries, the railroads have maintained team 
tracks between Third and First streets. The Norfolk and Western team tracks 
alone handle about 270 cars a month. It is admitted by the engineer who testified 
in favor of the Norfolk and Western site that the location of the station on that site 
would mean the obliteration of the team tracks. There appears to be no other suit- 
able location for team tracks along the Southern Railway line. If those who ship 
into Winston-Salem, over the Southern Railway are compelled to have the cars con- 
taining their freight shifted to the Norfolk and Western team tracks, then these 
shippers will be forced to pay to the Norfolk and Western a freight rate for a five mile 
minimum haul, besides pay more for drayage, as it appears that the nearest point 
for team tracks on the Norfolk and Western is at Sixth Street. 

It appears from the testimony that the Wheeler Street site can be served by street 
cars, while it is doubtful if street cars can serve the station if located at the Norfolk 
and Western site. Evidence was introduced of a proposition that has already been 
made the city authorities for a franchise for jitney service to operate between the 
Union Station and any part of the city for twenty-five cents a passenger and one to 
operate between the Union Station and Courthouse Square for five cents per passen- 
ger. So the Commission is practically assured of convenient and cheap means of 
transportation to and from the station if located at the Wheeler Street site. 

From a civic viewpoint it appears that the Wheeler Street site affords great op- 
portunities for a clean, attractive and beautiful landscape development, free from 
the dirty, grimy and unsatisfactory location in the midst of the railroad freight 
yards which would be the case at the Norfolk and Western site. The Commission 
is of the opinion from the evidence presented that the latter site can never success- 
fully be developed into a pleasing landscape. 



88 N. C. COBPORATION COMMISSION 

It was contended by the advocates of the Wheeler Street site, and there was evi- 
dence to substantiate it, that this site is more convenient for the largest number of 
the citizens of the city. It appears that the new Boulevard and Belews Street will 
make the Wheeler Street site closer than the Norfolk and Western site for the people 
in the southern part of the city and the 15,000 people just outside the city limits. 
The same appears to be true with regard to those in the northern part of the city by 
the use of the new street. It is self-evident that the Wheeler Street site is more con- 
venient for the 26% living in the eastern portion of the city. From a careful study 
of the city map it appears that the northern part of the city is swinging around to 
the south and the southern portion of the city is swinging around to the north in a 
crescent shape. It is quite evident that with the further growth of the city these 
two sections will grow together and thus give a central location both east and west 
and north and south. Mayor Hanes testified that the Wheeler Street site is now cen- 
trally located as to population with reference to north and south and that it is 
slightly east of the center of population from east to west, and he also illustrated this 
with a map of the city plan. 

The disadvantages of the Norfolk and Western site appear to be many. From a 
civic viewpoint the evidence shows that this location will always be dirty, unsatis- 
factory and unsightly, being located in the midst of a railroad freight yard with its 
usual objectionable features. It is impossible to make it an attractive and pleasing 
gateway to the city, with the alleged notorious "Monkey Bottom, " ''Gas Hill" and 
"Long Branch" on the one side and the railroad freight yards on the other. When 
the time comes in the future for additional facilities, expansion will be impossible 
because the station will be wedged in between two railroads and the freight yards. 
By the location on this site the city's traffic problem will not be helped, but on the 
other hand will be greatly hampered. All of the traffic to the station will be con- 
centrated into the already congested area of Third and Fourth streets, and there will 
be but one thirty-five foot street to accommodate this traffic; The railroad freight 
yards will be crippled, and the freight traffic to the industries will be tied up more 
and more as these industries grow. At least two of the yard tracks must be abolished 
as well as the three team tracks above referred to. 

This Commission is asked by the advocates of the Norfolk and Western site to 
assume the responsibility of locating the Union Station for the fastest growing city 
in the State at a point which, according to the uncontradicted evidence of three ex- 
pert railroad operating men, will serve to lock up the freight facilities of the city and 
be a bar to further development. The Commission cannot accept such a responsi- 
bility. It takes a just pride in the growth of the industries of Winston-Salem and 
in the growth of its wholesale and jobbing business, and cannot make up its mind to 
so cripple its freight service, realizing the fact, as it was brought out in evidence, that 
ninety per cent of the business of the railroads in Winston-Salem is in the hauling of 
its freight and only ten per cent in the hauling of passengers. 

It is, therefore, ordered, That the petition be dismissed. 

It is further ordered. That on the date that the new Union Station is open for 
traffic, the Southern Railway Company shall establish and maintain at some con- 
venient point on its line between Second and Seventh streets in the city at Winston- 
Salem an umbrella, or other suitable shed, sufficient for the protection of passengers 
from rain and snow, at which all outgoing and incoming passenger trains, except 
trains numbered 21 and 22, running between Winston-Salem and North Wilkesboro 
and Winston-Salem and Barber, shall stop to take on and discharge passengers. 
That train No. 2, operating between Winston-Salem and Greensboro, shall receive 



DECISIONS AND ADJUSTMENT OF COMPLAINTS 89 

passengers at and start from said shed, and train No. 7, operating between Greens- 
boro and Winston-Salem, shall continue on to such shed to discharge passengers. 
That the Southern Railway Company shall not be required to maintain any ticket 
office or check any baggage at said shed. 

It is FURTHER ORDERED, That on the date that the new Union Station is opened 
for traffic the Norfolk and Western Railway Company and the Winston-Salem 
Southbound Railroad Company shall establish and maintain at some convenient 
point between the old Norfolk and Western Passenger station and Third Street, in 
the city of Winston-Salem, an umbrella or other suitable shed, sufficient for the pro- 
tection of passengers from rain and snow at which all incoming and outgoing passen- 
ger trains of the Norfolk and Western Railway shall stop to take on and discharge 
passengers and to which all incoming morning passenger trains of the Winston- 
Salem Southbound Railroad shall run to discharge passengers and at which all after- 
noon passenger trains of said Winston-Salem Southbound Railroad shall stop to 
take on passengers. At such shed the railroads aforesaid shall not be required to 
sell tickets or check baggage. 

The Commission shall deem it a compliance with this order if all three of the rail- 
road companies above mentioned shall maintain one joint substation on the Norfolk 
and Western station site or within three hundred feet thereof, provided trains are 
stopped at and started therefrom according to the above specifications. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This the 7th day of July, 1922. Clerk. 



IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION OF THE NORFOLK SOUTHERN 
RAILROAD COMPANY TO DISCONTINUE AGENCY AT OKISKO, N. C. 

This is a proceeding arising out of a petition of the Norfolk Southern Railroad 
Company for permission to discontinue its Okisko station as an agency station and 
make same a prepay station, due notice having been publicly made by posting such 
notice in a conspicuous place at said station of the railroad company's intention in 
the matter, and petition of protest against such action having been received, the 
matter, after the usual notice to the parties, having been set for public hearing on 
July 8th, and no one appearing in opposition to the proposed discontinuance of the 
station as a prepay station, and it appearing from the petition that the greater 
portion of the freight is forwarded in carload lots from such station, such as logs, 
mine props, with a small volume of inbound freight, and a small amount of revenue 
from passenger ticket sales, together with the fact that Okisko is located but L2 
miles from Chapanoke, N. C, where an agency station is maintained by the rail- 
road company, it is, therefore 

Ordered, That the petition of the Norfolk Southern Railroad Company, to dis- 
continue its Okisko station as an agency station and make same a prepay station, 
be granted. 

By order of the Commission: R .0. Self^ 

This 8th day of July, 1922. Clerk. 



DO N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

ATLANTIC BITHULITHIC COMPANY AGAINST NORFOLK SOUTHERN 
RAILROAD COMPANY. 

Order 

The complainants seek to have the Commission order the Norfolk Southern Rail- 
road to perform switching service between its gravel pit siding near Lillington and 
the connection track of the Atlantic and Western Railroad, at Lillington, so that 
complainants may ship gravel via the Atlantic and Western to Sanford at a lower 
rate than now applies to their shipments. 

The present rate being applied by the Norfolk Southern is 87 3^^ cents per ton, 
which is made by applying 25% less than its local rate of 50 cents for 5 miles plus 50 
cents per ton, the latter being the rate of the Atlantic and Western from Lillington to 
Sanford. Complainants allege that the gravel pit siding is located within the city 
limits at Lillington and less than a mile from the Norfolk Southern Railroad station; 
that the connection track of the Atlantic and Western is farther away but not beyond 
a reasonable switching distance. There is some difference in the figures showing 
measurements of distance as presented in evidence by complainants compared with 
those of defendants, but distance alone considered there would probably be no good 
reason for defendants decUning to switch. Defendants contend that while the gravel 
pit siding may be located within the city limits, they have no switching limits at 
Lillington, and what switching is performed has to be done with road engines while 
in service on local trains, and to force them to perform such switching service under 
these circumstances would work a hardship on them in the matter of delays. They 
set up the further contention that the gravel pit siding is operated by them as a 
separate station which probably handles more tonnage than any other station on this 
line, and while the billing and other necessary agency services in connection with 
the movement of freight to and from this place are performed by the Lillington 
agent, this is the same arrangement as in effect at other separate prepay stations. 
They point out that they have other stations on their line just as near each other and 
cite particularly the case of Varina and Fuquay Springs. Both of these stations are 
within the same corporate limits and yet no contention has ever been raised that 
switching service should govern their interchange with the Durham and Southerm 
Railroad. 

Within recent months the Commission held a hearing, at which full representation 
was had on both sides covering the question of gravel rates within our State, and 
upon the record fixed a rate of 66 cents per ton for the longer lines of the State for a 
distance of 25 miles (single line), and 86 cents for double line, which is the distance of 
the Atlantic and Western from Lillington to Sanford, and for which distance the 
Atlantic and Western has a rate of 50 cents per ton, which, as before stated, com- 
plainants desire to have applied in connection with the switching charge. 

The Atlantic and Western is a short line of only 25 miles in length and owns no 
freight equipment. If we should order switching services performed at Lillington 
and shippers desired to use the Atlantic and Western, the latter line would under 
ordinary circumstances have to furnish the equipment, which would have to be 
switched in empty and out loaded by the Norfolk Southern Railroad. Moreover, 
such an order would be tantamount to ordering a reduction in the rate recently 
made for this distance by the Commission, as above referred to, as the Norfolk 
Southern would no doubt wish to meet the competition and apply the same rate of 
50 cents. 



DECISIONS AND ADJUSTMENT OF COMPLAINTS 91 

Upon the record the Commission is of the opinion, and so finds, that no injustice 
is being done complainants in the rate they are at present paying on gravel from 
Lillington to Sanford, and it is, therefore. 

Ordered, That this case be and the same is hereby dismissed. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 10th day of July, 1922. Clerk. 

Pell, Commissioner, dissents. 

Liberty Telephone Company 

Business, 1-party F. R % 3.00 

Residence, 1-party F. R 2.00 

Effective at once. 
Granted July 10, 1922. 



IN THE MATTER OF THE PROTEST OF THE CITIZENS OF CHAPEL HILL 
AGAINST INCREASE IN RATES OF THE CHAPEL HILL TELEPHONE 
COMPANY. 

Order 

This cause came on to be heard March 24, 1922, on petition from the citizens of 
Chapel Hill protesting rates of the Chapel Hill Telephone Company authorized by 
the Board of Aldermen of Chapel Hill, as follows: 

Business phone, single line $ 4.50 per month 

Business phone, duplex Une 2. 50 per month 

Residence phone, single line 3. 00 per month 

Residence phone, duplex line 2. 00 per month 

In this connection it may be stated that the rates set out above are higher than 
the rates of any other telephone exchange within the State of approximately the same 
class and size — there being 369 phones on the exchange of which 107 are rural phones 
for which rural service at a charge of fifty cents per month is made. From the 
income account presented by the telephone company, it appears that the rates 
approved by the board of aldermen of the town of Chapel Hill will yield only a suffi- 
cient amount to cover operating expenses, depreciation, and a fair return on a capital 
investment, and the Commission would be inclined to authorize this schedule if it 
were not thought that economies can be effected which can offset a difference in the 
charges set out in the above schedule and the schedule prescribed below. 

The Commission finds that the Chapel Hill Telephone Company is very hberal 
in paying its employees compared to other telephone companies of approximately 
the same class and size, and in adjusting this rate it is not the desire of the Com- 
mission to reduce to the extent of forcing the company to reduce the compensa- 
tion of its employees. Therefore, it is 

Ordered, That the Chapel Hill Telephone Company, on and after August 1, 1922, 
be authorized to charge and collect the following schedule of rates: 

Business phone, single line $ 4. 00 per month 

Business phone, duplex line 2. 50 per month 

Residence phone, single line 2. 75 per month 

Residence phone, duplex line 2. 00 per month 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 12th day of July, 1922. Clerk. 



yz N. C. COEPORATION COMMISSION 

PETITION OF THE LEXINGTON TELEPHONE COMPANY, AT LEXING- 
TON EXCHANGE, FOR AN INCREASE IN RATES. 

Order 

This proceeding having been instituted by petition for increase in rates of the Lex- 
ington Telephone Company, filed May 18, 1922, copy of which was served upon the 
mayor of Lexington by mail on the same date and answer filed by the town of Lex- 
ington on June 23, 1922, praying the dismissal of the petition, and the Commission 
having set July 11, 1922, as the date upon which to hear the issues involved, and 
upon that date the Commission, prior to the hour set for the hearing, having been 
notified by the parties to the proceeding, agreement between them upon the following 
schedule : 

Business telephone, special line $ 3. 75 per month 

Business telephone, duplex line 3. 25 per month 

Residence telephone, special line 2.25 per month 

Residence telephone, 4-party selection 1.50 per month 

All the above business and residence rates for regular service in suburbs outside 
exchange area (city limits of about one mile radius) are to be 25 cents higher for 
party lines and 50 cents higher for special lines. 

Desk telephone sets, additional • $ .25 

Extension sets (desk or wall type), residence -_ .50 

Extension sets (desk or wall type) , business .75 

Extension sets with calling devise dials, attached, extra .25 

Extension bells .25 

Extra user .50 

The above schedule is approved. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 12th day of July, 1922. Clerk. 

(See also order July 27, 1921.) 



IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION OF THE PIEDMONT POWER AND 
LIGHT COMPANY FOR PERMISSION TO REDUCE ITS RATE FOR 
ELECTRIC CURRENT USED FOR LIGHTING PURPOSES IN THE 
CITY OF BURLINGTON. 

Order 

Petition having been received from the Piedmont Power and Light Company 
setting forth that, among other things, on account of the peculiar circumstances 
surrounding petitioner's business in the city of Burlington, both in regard to the 
location of the equipment of the petitioner and the more advantageous franchise 
under which it operates in the city of Burlington, and requesting that it be 
allowed to reduce its lighting rate for electric current in the city of Burlington from 
its present rate to the following rate: 

10 cents per k.w. for first 50 k.w.h. per month. 
8 cents per k.w. for next 500 k.w.h. per month. 



CLAIMS AND COMPLAINTS 



PASSENGER AND FREIGHT SERVICE 

Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company to the Commisson. Petition for discon- 
tinuance of regular station at Spring Hill. Counter petition filed. Dismissed. * 

Board of Commissioners of Mecklenburg County v. Seaboard Air Line Railroad 
Company. Application for underpass between Charlotte and Matthews. Dismissed. 

Town of Roanoke Rapids v. Seaboard Air Line Railway Company. Complaint 
of condition of crossing at Roanoke Avenue. Defendant Company advises that 
crossing bell would be installed at Roanoke Junction, 

RAILROADS 

W. H. Snider v. Southern Railway Company. Complaint of condition of cross- 
ing at Addie. Personal investigation is made by Commissioner Lee and arrange- 
ments are made to put in crossing. 

Citizens of Jamesville v. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company. Complaint of 
passenger and baggage service at Jamesville. Adjusted. 

Goldsboro Chamber of Commerce v. American Railway Express Company, 
Southern Railway Company and Norfolk Southern Railway Company. Complaint 
of inadequate facilities for handling passengers and express. After much corre- 
spondence and a hearing at Goldsboro, the matter was fully discussed. By re- 
arrangement of trains, etc., matter is adjusted. 

Southern Railway Company to the Commission. Application to cut out flag 
stations on train 111 at Nelson, Brassfield, E. Durham, West Durham, University, 
Efland, McLeansville and Four Mile; also trains Nos. 21 and 22 at Funston, 
Efland, Glen Raven, McLeansville and Four Mile. Granted. 

Citizens of Freeman v. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company. Complaint as to 
freight facilities at Freeman, asking that an agent be furnished to give service de- 
sired. It appearing that the revenue received at this station is not sufficient to 
justify employing an agent and that the local freight conductors can handle the 
business without inconvenience to the people, case is dismissed. 

Winston-Salem Southbound Railway to the Commission. Application for dis- 
continuance of trains Nos. 49 and 52 between Badin and Whitney. Due to the de- 
pressed conditions existing under which railroads were operating, this application 
was granted as a temporary relief. 

Citizens of New Bern v. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company. Application 
for restoration of train service between New Bern and Wilmington; also connection 
at New Bern with Norfolk Southern morning train from Goldsboro. Defendant 
advises Commission that it will hold train at New Bern for connection with Norfolk 
Southern train with the understanding that cooperation will be had in the matter by 
wiring ahead passenger information. With reference to restoration of passenger 
train service it appears that by rearrangement of train schedules the matter is 
adjusted. 

Town of Jamesville v. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company. Petition asking 
that arrangement be made for agent to meet train No. 64 for convenience and com- 
fort of passengers as well as to look after telegrams and express. Defendant company 



102 N. C. COKPORATION COMMISSION 

is advised that it should install reasonable station service, which it appeared 
would require meeting trains by agent. This request being complied with, case is 
closed. 

A. G. Bowden v. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company. Complaint of rail- 
road crossing at Hobgood being blocked and this being a hindrance and also danger- 
ous for school children. The matter was looked into by the defendant company and 
adjusted. 

High Point, Randleman, Asheboro and Southern Railway Company to the Com- 
riiission. Petition asking for change in schedule of train 143. Granted. 

M. L. Southerland, Jr., v. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company. Complaint 
of unsatisfactory service in operation of private siding. Adjusted. 

Union Wholesale Lumber Company v. Seaboard Air Line Railway Company. 
Application for siding facilities at Milbrook. Arrangements made to provide ex- 
tension of track at Milbrook to take care of business. 

Berry O'Kelly v. Seaboard Air Line Railroad Company. Petition asking that 
Shoo-Fly stop at Method. Petition is granted and defendant company advised that 
stop be made at Method with trains 41 and 44. 

Citizens of Curry v. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company. Complaint of 
service at station at this point, especially with reference to agent or caretaker meet- 
ing trains Nos. 52 and 60. Dismissed. 

Rev. John A. Savage v. Seaboard Air Line Railway. Complaint as to passenger 
train service at Franklinton, with special reference to through trains not stopping 
at that point for passengers. Dismissed. 

Citizens of Rook v. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company. Complaint of 
inadequate trackage facilities and yards. Defendant advises that present track 
entirely adequate to protect business, and with full cooperation of shippers prompt 
movements could be made. Complainant advises that they will let the matter rest 
for a while during the dull season but will still insist on more facilities later on. Dis- 
missed. 

Citizens of Mitchell and Yancey Counties v. Carohna, Clinchfield and Ohio Rail- 
way Company. Application for establishment of depot at Poplar. Dismissed. 

Citizens of Terra Ceia v. Norfolk Southern Railroad Company. Petition for 
establishment of agency. It appearing that the revenue from this station would 
hardly justify establishment of agency, case dismissed. 

Albion Dunn, Attorney for Colored Citizens between Ayden and Greenville v. 
Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company. Complaint of lack of passenger accom- 
modation furnished negroes. Defendant company advises that after complete 
investigation they are not in a position to put on larger car but later on, should 
the necessity exist, a new equipment could be acquired and the situation could be 
relieved. 

Carolina and Northwestern Railway Company to the Commission. Application 
for curtailment of passenger train service between Lenoir and Hickory. Dismissed. 

L. C. Lsenhour v. Norfolk and Southern Railroad Company. Complaint as to 
delay in defendant company building siding after a contract has been arranged. 
Adjusted. 

Citizens of Black Creek v. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company, Complaint 
of train service and service at depot. Adjusted. 



CLAIMS AND COMPLAINTS 103 

Citizens of Freys Siding v. Southern Railway Company. Petition asking that 
flag station be estabhshed at said point. Defendant company advises that trains 
will stop on flag at this siding. 

Southern Railway Company to the Commission. Application for change in name 
of station Mayworth to Cramerton. Change in name granted, effective Janu- 
ary 2, 1921. 

Louisville and Nashville Railroad Company to the Commission. AppHcation to 
discontinue agency at Ranger. Notice posted with reference to closing agency. 
Application granted. 

Maxton, Alma and Southbound Railroad Company to the Commission. Appli- 
cation for discontinuance of trains 35 and 36. Application approved. 

East Tennessee and Western North Carolina Railroad to the Commission. Ap- 
plication for curtailment of train service. Granted. 

V. D. Baker v. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company and Seaboard Air Line 
Railroad Company. Petition asking that defendant companies make connection 
with both morning and night trains at Pembroke. Defendant companies make 
arrangements for this connection. 

Smoky Mountain Railway Company to the Commission. Application for every- 
other-day train movement. Granted. 

Gorman Wheel Company v. Seaboard Air Line Railway Company. Complaint 
to change Seaboard Air Line Schedule from Oxford to southern points. It appear- 
ing that the schedule was discussed with the patrons and decided on as satisfactory 
and that their trains would take care of the service, the case is dismissed. 

Citizens of Osborn v. Seaboard Air Line Railroad Company. Petition for im- 
proving passenger service by additional service between Osborn and Hamlet, or 
stopping of trains 3 and 4 on flag. Adjusted. 

Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company to the Commission. Application to make 
service on Midland Branch triweekly. Granted, subject to removal upon complaint. 

Burke County Commissioners v. Southern Railway Company. Petition for con- 
struction of underpass near Morganton. This matter having been taken up with 
officials of defendant company and chairman of Burke County Road Commission 
and agreement having been reached as to same, case closed. 

Southern Railway Company to the Commission. Application for reduction in 
train service on Ramseur Branch. Application denied. 

Negro Legislation. There being a commission appointed by the Governor, under 
resolution of the General Assembly, among other things to investigate the operation 
of transportation laws as they apply to negroes in this State, and the Corporation 
Commission desirous of making this the subject of a conference invites the various 
railroads to meet in its office February 6, to give consideration to the matters about 
which there was general complaint and the remedies that should be applied. The 
necessity for providing for each race equal accommodations was impressed upon the 
railroad companies and also keeping the coaches in sanitary condition. As result of 
this conference the general practice of having train crew and news boys occupy part 
of the coaches assigned to colored passengers was to be discontinued and the other 
suggestions were carefully considered and taken care of. 

Marion Board of Trade v. Carolina, Clinchfield and Ohio Railroad Company and 
Southern Railroad Company. Complaint as to curtailment of their train service. 



104 N. C. COEPORATION COMMISSION 

Defendant companies advised that complaint will not suffer as their freight is taken 
care of any way. Case dismissed. 

Citizens of Murfreesboro v. Albemarle Steam Navigation Company. Petition 
asking for establishment of daily boat line service between Tunis and Murfreesboro. 
Defendant company advises that they will inaugurate a schedule between the points 
suggested. 

Order of Locomotive Engineers v. Norfolk Southern Railroad Company and Sea- 
board Air Line Railroad Company. Complaint of improper maintenance of switch 
light. Adjusted. 

Citizens of Siler City and Liberty v. Southern Railway Company. Petition ask- 
ing that discontinuance of trains 132 and 133 and change of schedule between San- 
ford and Mount Airy be not allowed. It appearing that such application had not 
been made by defendant company and petitioners so advised, case is dismissed. 

Citizens of Fair Bluff v. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company. Complaint of 
accommodations furnished the public at Fair Bluff and asking that improvement in 
service be made. Adjusted. 

Durham Chamber of Commerce v. Southern Railway Company. Petition asking 
for extension of Chapel Hill train to Durham. Dismissed. 

Greensboro Daily News v. Norfolk Southern Railroad Company, Seaboard Air 
Line Railway Company and Southern Railway Company. Petition with reference 
to connection of trains at Asheboro and Aberdeen in order to give better mail service. 
Adjusted. 

Citizens of Brickhaven, Corinth, Norwood, Star, Mount Gilead, Biscoe v. Norfolk 
Southern Railway Company. Complaint of passenger service. Former passenger 
train schedules on trains 30 and 31 between Raleigh and Charlotte reinstated. Ad- 
justed. 

Southern Railway Company to the Commission. Application for permission to 
change the name of station known as Cooleemee Mills to Cooleemee. Granted. 

First Bank and Trust Company of Hendersonville v. Southern Railway Company. 
Complaint of refusal of agent at Flat Rock to accept checks on North Carohna 
banks. Dismissed. 

Nat. M. Pickett v. Norfolk and Western Railway Company. Complaint of pas- 
senger service at Walnut Cove between the Atlantic and Yadkin Railroad and the 
Norfolk and Western Railroad, asking that trains 21 and 22 stop at Walnut Cove 
for Atlantic and Yadkin passengers. Request granted. 

Southern Railway Company to the Commission. Application for establishment 
of prepay station at Mile Post 242 to be known as Shelton. Granted. 

Citizens of Dendron v. Southern Railway Company. Petition for trains 21 and 22 
to stop on flag. Petition denied. 

Citizens of Brunswick County v. Wilmington, Brunswick and Southern Railroad 
Company and Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company. Complaint of train service 
in that the schedules and service both for passengers and freight are not in keeping 
with the necessities of the pubhc generally. It not being within the jurisdiction of 
the Commission to require one company to operate train over road of another 
company, case is dismissed. 

Town of Edenton v. Norfolk Southern Railroad Company. Petition to establish 
and maintain gates at Church Street. After investigation it appears that railroad 



CLAIMS AND COMPLAINTS 105 

company asked for opportunity to make effective its plan to require all trains and 
engines passing crossings to stop and send a man ahead to flag crossing. The Com- 
plainants ask that the Commission postpone action on this matter indefinitely. 

C. R. Rogers v. Southern Railway Company. Complaint of passenger service on 
train from Asheville and Spartanburg and asking for better accommodations. Ad- 
justed. 

Goldsboro Chamber of Commerce v. Goldsboro Union Passenger Station. Com- 
plaint of unsafe and unsatisfactory conditions at union station at Goldsboro. This 
matter was taken up with the various companies entering the union depot and ten 
days in which to work out solution of the complaints so as to relieve conditions 
existing were given defendant companies. Adjusted. 

Winston-Salem Southbound Railway Company to the Commission. Appli- 
cation for discontinuance of trains 63 and 50 until October 1, 1921. Granted. In 
September this company again asked permission to discontinue restoration of these 
trains until November 10th. Granted. At the expiration of this time application 
for permission to use gasoline car between Badin and Whitney is made and this ap- 
phcation granted by the Commission, 

Lambert v. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company. Complaint of branch 
facilities. Adjusted. 

Rockingham Railroad Company v. Southern Bell Telephone Company. Ap- 
plication for exemption from order discontinuing freight service between Rocking- 
ham and Hamlet. Dismissed. 

State Prison v. S. A. L. Railway and Southern Railway Company. Complaint of 
freight cars standing on crossing in front of prison. Conditions remedied. 

Service Motor Corporation v. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company. Ap- 
plication for side track facilities. Complainant company advises that defendant 
company will erect siding on cost basis which is satisfactory and asks withdrawal of 
complaint. 

C. H. Dixon v. Southern Railway Company. Complaint of failure of passenger 
trains 9 and 10 to stop at Naples. It appearing that Naples is flagged for several 
trains and 9 and 10 being very heavy passenger trains, case dismissed. 

Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company to the Commission. Application to dis- 
continue agency at Beard. Granted. 

Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company to the Commission. Application to dis- 
continue agency at Over Hills. Granted. 

Aberdeen and Rockfish Railroad Company to the Commission. Cancellation of 
motor bus between Aberdeen and Fayetteville. Approved. 

Citizens of Clay and Cherokee Counties v. CaroHna and Georgia Railway Com- 
pany. Petition to require filing of schedule of freight rates; also establish regular 
schedules for passenger trains. It not being within the jurisdiction of the Commis- 
sion to force a corporation to become a common carrier, the matter is dismissed with 
defendant company, and the hope expressed that it could be arranged for it to 
become a common carrier. 

Beaufort Chamber of Commerce v. Norfolk Southern Railroad Company and 
Southern Railway Company. Pullman service between Goldsboro and Beaufort. 
Pullman extended from Washington, D. C, through to Beaufort, effective July 1st. 



106 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

Goldsboro, Kinston, New Bern and Rocky Mount Chambers of Commerce v. 
Southern Railway Company. Complaint of removal of Goldsboro-Asheville Pull- 
mans. Complaint withdrawn by the Rocky Mount Chamber of Commerce. Dis- 
missed. 

Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company to the Commission. Application to close 
agency at Spout Springs. Granted. 

Peele and Company v. Seaboard Air Line Railroad Company. Complaint of 
freight service. Adjusted. 

Ahoskie v. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company. Complaint of depot facilities. 
Adjusted. 

Seaboard Air Line Railway Company to the Commission. Application for changes 
in schedules of through trains. Approved, provided connection with Maxton for 
Fayetteville and Rowland at Pembroke is maintained. 

Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company v. Williamston Telephone Company. 
Complaint of wire crossings between Plymouth and Parmele. Copy of rules and 
regulations with reference to wire crossings mailed defendant company. Case 
closed. 

Seaboard Air Line Railway Company to the Commission. Application for con- 
tinuance of Portsmouth-Lewiston train on Sunday. Granted. 

Southern Railway Company to the Commission. Notice of establishment of 
freight and ticket agency at Spindale with advice that Spindale will be made Western 
Union Telegraph station, also Southeastern Express station. 

Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company to the Commission. Application for dis- 
continuance of trains 90 and 91 and 59 and 60. Petition denied by the Commission 
and application withdrawn. 

Southern Railway Company to the Commission. Application to abolish railway 
stations: Patterson Springs, Mooresboro, Ellenboro, Banaja, Shoals, Newell and 
Barium Springs. Withdrawal of application by petitioner as to Patterson Springs, 
Mooresboro and Ellenboro. Granted as to Banaja and Barium Springs. After 
dismissal of petition as to Bethania the matter is again taken up and permission is 
granted to discontinue Bethania and establish a prepay station. 

Town of Red Springs v. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company. Complaint of 
curtailment of passenger service of trains 66 and 67 between .Fayetteville and Ben- 
nettsville. Denied. 

Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company to the Commission. Application for dis- 
continuance of agency at Hayne. Dismissed. 

C. D. Ray & Sons v. Southern Railway Company. Complaint as to maintenance 
of side track. It appearing that it was the intention of defendant company to term- 
inate operation of a private siding unless new contract was executed. Commission 
advises said defendant company to continue same until a determination of the 
question of maintenance. Adjusted. 

Citizens of Todd v. Norfolk and Western Railroad Company. Complaint of 
failure of defendant company to provide depot facilities at Elkland sometimes known 
as Todd. New station completed and put in operation. 

Virginia and Carolina Southern Railroad Company to the Commission. Appli- 
cation to close agency at Dublin and make same a prepay station. Petition against 
closing station filed. Case dismissed. 



CLAIMS AND COMPLAINTS 107 

Harding Manufacturing Company v. Carolina and Northwestern Railway Com- 
pany. Complaint as to side track and handling the freight, and also road crossing 
asking for underpass. Defendant company advises that investigation has been made 
and it had been agreed to move road crossing as requested. Other matters com- 
plained of adjusted. 

J. R. Hall and H. C. Walker v. Appalachian Railroad Company. Complaint of 
passenger accommodations and freight transportation on said line of road. Amend- 
ment to petition filed and the matter was set for hearing but due to sickness in family 
of attorney for petitioners hearing was postponed. Commission is later advised that 
petitioners would voluntarily take nonsuit. Dismissed. 

Bureau of Sanitary Engineering State Board of Health v. Norfolk and Western 
Railway. Complaint of drainage conditions in vicinity of defendant company's 
tracks in Stoneville. Adjusted. 

Citizens of Parmele v. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company. Petition asking for 
adequate and convenient sewerage accommodations in rebuilding station at Parmele. 
Defendant company advises that proper accommodations will be provided. 

Farmers Hardware Company v. Southern Railway Company. Complaint of 
length of team track facilities at Forest City. Extension of track provided by 
defendant company.. 

Town of Shelby v. Seaboard Air Line Railroad Company. Petition for erection 
of bridge at Washington and LaFayette Street crossing. Grade crossing arranged 
for. Matter adjusted. 

Skyland Hosiery Mills v. Southern Railroad Company. Petition for Carolina 
Special to stop on flag at Flat Rock its trains 27 and 28. Petition granted. 

Wake Forest v. Seaboard Air Line Railway. Petition for improved passenger 
service for Wake Forest consisting of stopping certain through trains. These trains 
being operated on fast schedules account of competitive conditions in connection 
with tourist travel, and to make additional local stops would require more time in 
schedule or failure to hold schedule, it was arranged, however, to take care of Wake 
Forest to some extent. 

Southern Railway Company to the Commission. Apph cation for withdrawal of 
Goldsboro-Cincinnati sleeper. Granted. 

Southern Railway Company to the Commission. Discontinuance of Raleigh- 
Wilmington sleeper. This sleeper discontinued until July, 1922, at which time an 
order was made reinstating service, for the summer months and again the service 
was discontinued September 1st. 

Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company v. D. S. Long. Complaint of wire cross- 
ings. Adjusted. 

Seaboard Air Line Railway Company to the Commission. Application to close 
certain stations on Sunday. Granted. 

City of Wilmington v. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company. Application for 
approval of agreement between city of Wilmington and Atlantic Coast Line Rail- 
road Company. Contract with reference to maintenance of highway bridges over 
Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth streets, Wilmington. Approved. 

Wilson G. Lamb v. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company and Southern Railway 
Company. Complaint tariffs covering through rates between local stations. Ad- 
justed. 



108 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

Seaboard Air Line Railway Company to the Commission. Condemnation of 
right of way through property of Albert Bretseh, Mrs. Albert Bretsch, C. T. Brown, 
Mrs. C. T. Brown, W. J. Lougee, Mrs. W. J. Lougee, Miss Mary H. Horton and Miss 
Annie S. Horton. 

Carolina and Northwestern Railway Company to the Commission. Application 
for change of schedule. Approved. 

Winston-Salem Southbound Railway Company to the Commission. Application 
for 'change in schedule and discontinuance of trains Nos. 50 and 63. Approved. 

Seaboard Air Line Railway Company to the Commission. Application for change 
of schedules. Approved. 

R. E. Lewis v. Southern Railway Company. Complaint of colored passengers 
riding in coach with white passengers. Adjusted. 

Citizens of Durham and Duncan branch of Norfolk Southern Railroad Company 
to the Commission. Petition for improved railway services. Dismissed. 

Town of Cary v. Seaboard Air Line Railroad Company and Southern Railway 
Company. Petition asking that watchman be placed at crossing in Cary for safety 
of traveling public. Dismissed. 

Citizens of Ridgeview v. Norfolk Southern Railway Company. Complaint of 
depot facilities asking that shed be provided for convenience of passengers. Ad- 
justed. 

R. H. Peasley, Sr., v. Norfolk Southern Railroad Company. Complaint of 
inability to transact business on account of baggage locked up in depot. Adjusted. 

Lola Manufacturing Company v. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company. Com- 
plaint of mixup in shipments going to Stanley on the Seaboard Air Line as there is a 
siding on Atlantic Coast Line known as Stanley Creek. Defendant company advises 
that siding will be discontinued. 

George R. Ross v. Norfolk Southern Railroad Company. Complaint of passen- 
ger service relative to No. 70 missing Seaboard connection at Aberdeen. Adjusted. 

Danville and Western Railway Company to the Commission. Notice of establish- 
ment of additional passenger service between Danville, Leaksville, Spray and Draper. 
Due to strike situation and shortage of coal this Commission has later asked per- 
mission to discontinue said service. Granted. 

Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company v. Alfred Britt. Complaint of wire cross- 
ing at Buie. Adjusted. 

Southern Railway Company to the Commission. Permission to cut out flag stops 
for train No. 14 at Asbury, Bilbore, Dukesyde, Nelson and Tinnins. Granted. 

Forest City Chamber of Commerce v. Carolina, Clinchfield and Ohio Railroad 
Company. Petition for better passenger service between Marion and Spartanburg. 
Dismissed. 

Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company v. J. S. McRainey. Complaint of wire 
crossings near Rex. Rules and specifications for wire crossings mailed defendant 
and case closed. 

Seaboard Air Line Railroad Company to the Commission. Discontinuance of 
trains 31 and 34 between Hamlet and Charlotte. Granted. 

Ellis Drug Store v. Norfolk Southern Railroad Company. Complaint of service. 
Due to strikes, all service appeared not as regular as in normal conditions but with 
the understanding that conditions would improve, case is dismissed. 



CLAIMS AND COMPLAINTS 109 

J. B. Ivey V. Southern Railway Company. Complaint of service. Dismissed. 

Tennessee and North Carolina Railway Company to the Commission. Establish- 
ment of motor car passenger tariff. Approved. 

Kinston Carohna Railroad Company to the Commission. Application to close 
agency at Pink Hill. Granted. 

Seaboard Air Line Railway Company to the Commission. Change in passenger 
train schedules. Granted. 

Cooperative Cotton Growers Association v. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Com- 
pany. Discrimination as to shipment of cotton from CHnton to Wilmington. Ad- 
justed. 

Southern Railway Company to the Commission. Application to close freight 
depot at one o'clock on Saturdays at Statesville. Granted. 

Southern Railway Company to the Commission. Schedule changes between Dur- 
ham and Keysville. 

ELECTRIC LIGHT COMPANIES 

Mrs. Margaret Porter Cesare and Citizens of Elkwood v. Weaverville Electric 
and Telephone Company. Complaint asking that the Commission make a complete 
investigation of methods used, character of equipment, etc., with reference to render- 
ing public service. Complaint investigated and adjusted. 

James N. Williamson, Jr., v. Piedmont Power and Light Company. Complaint 
of overcharge in rate, complaint being with reference to reading of meter. Adjusted. 

Burhngton Mills, Holt Plaid Mills, Elmira Cotton Mills and Lawrence S. Holt 
and Son v. Piedmont Power and Light Company. Increase in power rates. Ad- 
justed. 

Sharpsburg Drug Company v. Sharpsburg Light and Power Company. Com- 
plaint of discrimination in lighting rates. Adjusted. 

China Grove Roller Mills v. Southern Power Company. Complaint of dis- 
crimination in rates for power. Dismissed, as the matter of Southern Power Rates 
is in the Supreme Court for decision. 

J. S. Broomfield v. Brevard Light and Power Company. Complaint of over 
charge for power. Dismissed. 

Vanco Mills, Inc., v. Carolina Power and Light Company. Application for 
reduction in power rates for grain mills. Defendant company files supplemental 
rates for grist flour mill service, which rates are consented to by defendant and 
complaint withdrawn. 

Town of Longville v. Southern Public Utilities Company. Application for lights 
and current for the town and its residences. Defendant having no franchise in the 
town and the said town being very small and the cost to serve very large it seemed 
unable to justify the expenditure but advises that application would be given due 
consideration. 

Gibsonville v. Piedmont Power and Light Company. Complaint of failure to 
install additional lights. It appearing that failure to install additional lights is due 
to delay in arrival of material and company's finances and that the work will finally 
be accomplished, case is closed. 

Walker Brothers v. Hillsboro Light and Power Company. Complaint as to 
increase in power rates. Upon investigation it was found that the defendant 



110 



N. C. CORPOKATION COMMISSION 



company had increased rates without approval of the Commission, and it was 
ordered that new schedule be filed. The following schedule was filed under date of 
October 24, 1921: 

New Schedule of Rates 
Light Rates: 

13 cents per k.w. hour with a discount of 5% on bills which exceed 
$1 .25 if paid on or before 10th of month in which bill is rendered. 

Where customer's consumption reaches 75 k.w. hours in any one 
month, the rate is 11 cents per k.w.h., but no discount is allowed. 
Minimum charge per month $ 1.25 

Cooking and Heating Rates: 
6 cents per k.w. hour. 
No discounts. 
Minimum charge per month $ 2. 00 

Residence Water Pumping Motor Rates: 

On motors of 3 h.p. and below a minimum charge per month of $1 .25 
per h.p. or fraction thereof. 

First 10 k.w. hours at 13c per k.w. hour 

Next 5 k.w. hours at 12c per k.w. hour 

Next 10 k.w. hours at lie per k.w. hour 

All over 25 k.w. hours at 10c per k.w. hour 

No discounts. 

Straight Power Rates: 

Minimum of $1 .00 per month per h.p. for aggregate ratings of motors 
above 3 h.p., and $1 .25 per h.p. per month for motor ratings of 3 h.p. 
and below. 



Schedule 



to 



100 

200 

300 

400 

500 

2000 

5000 

6000 



k.w.h. at 



7y2c 


per k 


w.h. 


6Mc 


per k 


w.h. 


5c 


per k 


w.h. 


.0438c 


per k 


w.h. 


.0406c 


per k 


w.h. 


.0375c 


per k 


w.h. 


.0350c 


perk. 


w.h. 


.03c 


per k. 


w.h. 


.02i^c 


per k. 


w.h. 




100 
200 
300 
400 
500 
2000 
5000 

6000 and over 
Bills payable on or before 10th of month. 
No discounts. 

It appearing that the rates were a'fe reasonable as the company could operate under, 
case is dismissed. 

Leaksville Spray Ice Company v. Leaksville Power and Light Company. Com- 
plaint of unreasonable rates and asking that meters of defendant compan}^ be 
adjusted. Request complied with. 

Freeze-Bacon Hosiery Mills v. Home Electric Company. Complaint of excessive 
rates for power. Dismissed. 

Leaksville Light and Power Company to the Commission. Form of contract for 
electric power service filed for approval. Approved subject to complaint. 

Gilmers, Inc., v. Southern Public Utilities Company. Complaint of lighting for 
store billed through several meters. After investigation complainant is advised that 
it would be necessary to wire his building in such a way that would permit the com- 
pany to give lighting through one meter, it being customary for subscribers to wire 
buildings and arrange proper connection for the utility company's wires. Dismissed. 

V. R. Allison v. Southern Public Utilities Company. Complaint of charge for 
transfer of meters. Dismissed. 



CLAIMS AND COMPLAINTS 111 

R. H. Latham, Supt. Public Schools, Winston-Salem, v. Southern Public Utilities 
Company. Complaint of charge for transformers. It being regulation of company 
to charge for transformers and the Commission having made no regulation other than 
promulgating rates and approval of contracts, case is dismissed. 

EXPRESS COMPANIES 

Edgecombe Chamber of Commerce, Tarboro, v. Amercian Railway Express Com- 
pany. Complaint of delivery limits and request for extension. After thorough 
investigation by defendant, it appearing that extension of delivery limits at Tarboro 
would be a burden to said company and the business of the few referred to would not 
pay the additional cost, case is dismissed. 

American Railway Express Company to the Commission. Application to close 
office at High Rock. It appearing that should office at High Rock be closed the 
nearest express office to this point being eight miles, request is denied. 

American Railway Express Company to the Commission. Application for dis- 
continuance of Dundarrach as agency. Granted. 

American Railway Express Company to the Commission. Application for curtail- 
ment of service on Ramseur branch. It appears that this service was curtailed with- 
out making application to the Commission but after caUing same to the attention of 
petitioners and it appearing that the revenue received was very light, the Commission 
allows the service to remain as curtailed. 

Raleigh Chamber of Commerce v. American Railway Express Company. Com- 
plaint to discontinue the express service on trains 41 and 44. Commission is advised 
that arrangement has been effected to forward perishable traffic for points between 
Raleigh and Hamlet after departure of Seaboard train No. 11 and returning for de- 
livery by train No. 12 to protect shippers from complications with reference to with- 
drawal of service, with the hope that business would increase in near future to justify 
retaining services of trains 41 and 44. 

Citizens of. Wardville v. American Railway Express Company. Complaint of 
discontinuance of office. After investigation it appearing that business is not suffi- 
cient to maintain office at Wardville, case is dismissed. 

Bank of North Wilkesboro v. American Railway Express Company. Complaint 
of service with reference to money shipments. Withdrawn. 

H. H. McCoy and Company v. American Railway Express Company. Com- 
plaint of refusal of defendant company to give receipt when delivering packages. 
Adjusted. 

Hotel Joffre, Monroe, v. American Railway Express Company. Complaint of 
service of roads in vicinity of Monroe. Complainant desiring service inaugurated 
on Seaboard trains 31 and 34 between Charlotte and Hamlet, and it appearing that 
double daily service existed between these points and same not being profitable, 
plaintiff is so advised. The Commission is then advised by complainant that the 
matter had been adjusted. 

Citizens of Rose Hill and Teachey v. American Railway Express Company. Peti- 
tion asking for express refrigerator service for the strawberry section of Eastern 
North CaroHna to eastern and western markets. This being an. interstate matter, 
same is turned over to the Interstate Commerce Commission. 

Hickory Merchants Association v. American Railway Express Company. Com- 
plaint of service at Hickory. Adjusted. 

—8 



112 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



Southeastern Express Company to the Commission. Apphcation for discontinu- 
ance of office at High Rock. Granted. 

Builders Supply Company v. American Railway Express Company. Complaint 
of delivery service in Goldsboro. Commission is advised by defendant company 
that steps would be taken to outline delivery limits for Goldsboro. 

Pitt County Chamber of Commerce v. American Railway Express Company. 
Petition for express facilities at Simpson. Dismissed. 

Southeastern Express Company to the Commission. Petition to discontinue 
office at Dalton. Granted. 

Winston Leaf Tobacco and Storage Company v. Southeastern Express Company. 
Complaint of service. Adjusted. 

Dunn Chamber of Commerce v. American Railway Express Company. Petition 
for free delivery of express in Dunn. This service established. 

Citizens of Hillsboro v. Southeastern Express Company. Complaint of service 
by failure to keep office open and petition for delivery service. Service furnished by 
office remedied. 

American Railway Express Company to the Commission. Apphcation for dis- 
continuance of McFarland temporarily. Granted. 

Y. Z. Parker v. Southeastern Express Company. Complaint of service on account 
of discontinuance of loading express from 6:30 train at Middlesex. Adjusted. 

Prof. Louis Graves v. Southeastern Express Company, Complaint of failure to 
deliver packages. Adjusted. 

American Railway Express Company to the Commission. Application to close 
express agency at Hassell temporarily. Granted. 

Southeastern Express Company to the Commission. Application to close office 
at Mamers. Granted. 

American Railwaj^ Express Company to the Commission. Application to close 
office at Dundarrach temporarily. Granted. 

STEAM BOAT COMPANIES 

Citizens of Hyde County and Fairfield v. Fairfield Canal and Turnpike Company. 
Complaint of excessive tolls. Adjusted. 

J. S. Wynn v. Albemarle Steam Navigation Company. Complaint of service 
rendered by company. Adjusted. 

TELEGRAPH COMPANIES 

Wm. H. Harrison v. Western Union Telegraph Company. Complaint of refusal 
of defendant to deliver messages to West Asheville, a part of the city of Asheville. 
Defendant advises that complainant's residence is three miles from the Asheville 
office and this office does not refuse to effect deliveries in West Asheville but expedites 
same by telephone. Complainant is so advised and without having further request, 
case closed. 

Burlington Coffin Company v. Postal Telegraph Company. Complaint as to de- 
livery service. Defendant advises that inadequate delivery service had been due 
to not being able to secure messenger boys but the situation would be handled in the 
future with entire satisfaction. Complainant was also advised. 



CLAIMS AND COMPLAINTS 113 

C. W. Sandrock v. Western Union Telegraph Company. Complaint inadequate 
service at Fayetteville. Defendant advises that real trouble is in telephone con- 
nection existing by side cross in telephone cable. Adjusted. 

Town of Kenansville v. Western Union Telegraph Company. Petition for change 
in routing telegrams for Kenansville via Warsaw instead of Clinton. Defendant 
company advises willingness to make this change but suggests that service from 
Clinton would be more satisfactory in its opinion. Having no further advice from 
petitioner, the case is closed. 

Lumberton Chamber of Commerce v. Western Union Telegraph Company. Com- 
plaint of service asking for two operators and better service. Defendant company 
advises that total volume of business at Lumberton is not so heavy but that the 
force can easily handle same, as has been shown by experience, and to increase the 
number of employees would put expenses out of line with receipts. Dismissed. 

Western Union Telegraph Company to the Commission. Notice that office at 
Raeford will be discontinued. 

D. O. Newberry v. Western Union Telegraph Company. Complaint of no service 
on Sundays. Dismissed. 

TELEPHONE COMPANIES 

Citizens of Brevard v. Brevard Telephone Company. Complaint of service. 
After investigation and consultation with officers of the defendant company insisting 
that better service be rendered its patrons, case is closed. 

International Telephone Company to the Commission. Letter asking for informa- 
tion with reference to making application for increase in rates. Information given 
but having no further advice from petitioner, case dismissed. 

Citizens of Albemarle v. Albemarle Telephone Company. Complaint of rates 
and service. After investigation it appearing that complainant asked to leave the 
matter open in which to give the company time to install new equipment and im- 
mediate service, case is closed. 

Old Fort Telephone Company to the Commission. Application for discontinu- 
ance of service and to dismantle. Dismissed. 

W. D. Johnson v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Complaint 
of failure to install telephone. After investigation complainant advises that con- 
tract has been arranged and service to be installed. 

Fairfield Chamber of Commerce v. Washington and Hyde County Telephone 
Company. Complaint of service. It appearing that lines had been destroyed by 
storm several years and that the defendant company is steadily working in Hyde 
County to repair these lines and restore service and it being doubtful as to Commis- 
sion's authority to compel rebuilding owing to manner in which service was impaired, 
plaintiff is so advised with the belief of the Commission that the defendant company 
would be able to restore its service in near future. 

Cos Paxton v. Brevard Telephone Company. Complaint of failure of defendant 
company to install telephone in residenca Phone installed. 

H. M. Birkhead v. Asheboro Telephone Company. Complaint of failure to 
install telephone in residence. Defendant company advises that plan has been 
made to run cable out on street which will accommodate complainant. 

Riverside Telephone Company v. Asheboro Telephone Company. Complaint of 
service between Ramseur and Asheboro. Defendant company advises that line is 



114 N. C. COKPOBATION COMMISSION 

in need of repairs and will have to be rebuilt entirely before satisfactory service 
could be given, and it not being the intention of defendant to rebuild for reason that 
same did not pay. However, it would be glad to make connection with company or 
persons who were to build line from Ramseur to Asheboro and give them toll in and 
out. Complainant is so advised and no further advice being received, case is 
dismissed. 

Mrs. R. B. Overcash v. Southern Telephone and Telegraph Company. Appli- 
cation for installation of telephone in her residence at Derita. Dismissed. 

T. W. Crooks v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Complaint 
of refusal of defendant company to install telephone in place of business. Adjusted. 

Robbins, Fine and Paschall v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. 
Application for installation of telephone in place of business. Dismissed. 

A. M. Carson v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Application 
for installation of telephone. Dismissed. 

W. A. Harper, President Elon College, v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph 
Company. Complaint of service in the way of Burlington exchange refusing service 
on account of Elon College having contract with Gibsonville. Dismissed. 

E. W. S. Cobb V. Polk County Telephone Company. Complaint of discontinuance 
of line in Polk County. After investigation, Commission is advised by defendant 
company that it was impossible to secure cooperation for the continuance of the 
service and that one phone at Columbus would not pay for maintenance of line. 
Under the circumstances it appearing that the Commission could not require a 
telephone company to maintain its line on a losing proposition, the defendant was 
so advised. Later on petition is filed by citizens of Columbus County asking that 
service be restored. It appearing that many of these citizens were to have phones 
installed and satisfactory arrangements being made with the telephone company for 
continuance of service, case is closed. 

W. C. Thurston v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Appli- 
cation for installation of gong at mill in Graham. Dismissed. 

Dunn Chamber of Commerce v. Carolina Telephone and Telegraph Company. 
Complaint of failure of defendant company to give Sunday service to its subscribers. 
Complaint withdrawn. 

United States Public Service Health Hospital No. 45 v. Asheville Telephone and 
Telegraph Company. Complaint of failure of defendant company to install tele- 
phones. Phones installed. 

New Era Telephone Company v. Roanoke and Chowan Telephone Company. 
Physical connection at Ahoskie for long distance service. Telephone companies are 
advised that it seems that this connection could be arranged with each other as it is 
only a matter of division of tolls originating on petitioner's line and that it would 
make service more attractive to its subscribers. 

Navassa Guano Company v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. 
Complaint of service. Adjusted. 

Mrs. J. E. Wilson v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Ap- 
plication for installation of phone. Phone installed. 

G. A. Lyerly v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Complaint 
of failure of company to repair phone. Adjusted. 



CLAIMS AND COMPLAINTS 115 

Carolina Telephone and Telegraph Company v. East Carolina Electric and Rail- 
road Company. Request for permission for disconnection because of alleged non- 
payment of telephone tolls. Adjusted. 

City of Raleigh to the Commission. Petition for extension of telegraph, telephone 
and express service. Extension arranged for. 

Mrs. Mary T. Spalding v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. 
Application for installation of phone in residence. Phone installed. 

Raymond G. Parker v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Ap- 
plication for installation of phone. Phone installed. 

H. Lanier v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Apphcation 
for installation of phone in place of business. Phone installed. 

G. W. Dobbins v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Appli- 
cation for installation of phone in residence. Phone installed. 

J. 0. Guthrie v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Complaint 
of service. Adjusted. 

E. R. Ellis V. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Installation of 
telephone in place of business. Phone installed. Adjusted. 

J. M. Bristoe v. Muse Telephone Company. Complaint of service. Adjusted. 

W. E. Perdew v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Installation 
of telephone in cottage at Wrightsville Beach. Phone installed. 

Hotel Vass v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Application 
for installation of telephone. Phone installed. 

Raleigh Telephone Company v. Southern Railway Company. Complaint of dis- 
continuance of telephone in freight station in Raleigh. Dismissed. 

J. D. Cox V. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Application for 
installation of telephone. Phone installed. 

M. S. Willard v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Complaint 
of service at summer place on Masonboro Sound. Adjusted. 

J. H. Muse V. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Application 
for installation of telephone. Telephone installed. 

Pitt County Chamber of Commerce v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph 
Company. Installation of phone in Proctor Hotel at Greenville. Phone installed. 

Fenner S. Smith v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Apphca- 
tion for installation of telephone in residence. Phone installed. 

J. L. Roderick, Wilmington, v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. 
Application for installation of telephone. Phone installed. 

Slades, Rhodes and Company v. Home Telephone and Telegraph Company. Com- 
plaint of failure to give connection with Greenville from Hamilton. Adjusted. 

J. W. Stinson v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Installation 
of telephone in residence. Phone installed. 

North State Telephone Company to the Commission. Application for permis- 
sion to charge $1.00 for restoring service after line has been cut out for nonpayment. 
Granted. 

Penna Lumber Company v. Morris Telephone Company. Installation of tele- 
phone in office. Dismissed. 



116 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

J. W. King V. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Installation of 
telephone. Dismissed. 

E. A. Sheppard v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Installation 
of telephone in residence. Phone installed. 

W. L. Johnson v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Installation 
of telephone. Dismissed. 

Martin Schnibben v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Ap- 
plication for installation of phone in residence. Phone installed. 

J. F. Mullen v. Piedmont Telephone Company. Complaint of excessive charge 
for service. Dismissed. 

Frank R. Pitts v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Appli- 
cation for telephone to be installed in residence. Phone installed. 

Norwood Telephone Company to the Commission. Petition to remove part of 
system from Ansonville back to Norwood, discontinuing operations at Ansonville. 
The Norwood Telephone Company is advised that Commission always takes the 
position that where a public utility once establishes a business the service cannot be 
abandoned because of failure to pay, for the reason that the Commission has power 
to increase rate until it will pay, provided service will stand for it. Dismissed. 

Snow Camp Telephone Company v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Com- 
pany. Complaint of connection and charges. Dismissed. 

Acme Manufacturing Company v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Com- 
pany. Complaint of service. Adjusted. 

Dr. D. S. Currie v. Parkton Telephone Company. Complaint as to discrimination 
in rates. Dismissed. 

Cherryville v. Piedmont Telephone and Telegraph Company. Complaint of toll 
service from Cherryville to Gastonia. It appearing that this toll rate is in accordance 
with rate approved by the Commission, case is dismissed. 

Drexel Furniture Company v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. 
Complaint of pole rental charge by defendant company. It appearing that use of 
the defendant company's equipment is extended by courtesy and the charge for same 
is based on contract and agreement between parties, and a matter over which the 
Commission does not take jurisdiction, case dismissed. 

E. S. Collins V. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Application 
for installation of telephone in residence. Phone installed. 

Dallas C. Kirby v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Appli- 
cation for installation of telephone. The Commission is advised that while defendant 
company is carrying on new construction work in a most expeditious manner possible, 
yet it will hardly be in position to install new telephones in said vicinity until later. 
Dismissed. 

W. V. Hylton and W. F. Shelton v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Com- 
pany. Application for installation of phones in residences. Phones installed. 

L. M. Sumner v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Appli- 
cation for installation of phone in residence. Dismissed. 

Zola J. Suggs v. Cardenas Telephone Company. Complaint of excessive charge. 
Dismissed. 



CLAIMS AND COMPLAINTS 117 

W. R. Johnson v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Complaint 
of failure of defendant company to install telephone in place of business. Upon ad- 
vice from defendant company that it will take some time to get material for extension 
of facilities and also it will consume much time to erect the necessary cables, etc., 
for installation of phone but that same will be installed, case is closed. 

Town of Vass v. City Telephone Company. Complaint of service and increase in 
rates. Adjusted. 

Citizens of Long Creek Township v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Com- 
pany. Petition asking for telephone connection at McElroy's Store. Defendant 
company advises connection will be made within reasonable time. 

Black Mountain Telephone Company to the Commission. Application for 

increase in rates for Black Mountain. By agreement matter continued. 

Thomas B. Waugh v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Com- 
plaint of failure of defendant company to install telephone in home. Telephone 
installed. 

Samuel Hensley v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Com- 
plaint of failure of defendant company to install telephone. Telephone installed. 

W. S. Vestal v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Complaint 
of failure of defendant company to install telephone. Telephone installed. 

D. V. Davis v. Muse Telephone Company. Complaint of service charges. It 
appearing that line of defendant company was broken down by sleet and wind storm 
and there not being enough customers per line on their Une and the amount charged 
not being sufficient to put lines in repair, case is dismissed. 

Craven Agricultural Committee v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Com- 
pany. Complaint of lack of service in Raleigh. Adjusted. 

G. H. Lyle, Jr., v. Franklin Telephone and Electric Company. Complaint of 
charge for local calls. Dismissed. 

Home Telephone Company to the Commission. Application for charge of $1.00 
for restoration service due to suspension for nonpayment of exchange or toll service 
charges. Granted. 

H. J. Ellis V. Home Telephone and Telegraph Company. Complaint of inadequate 
service in connection with Macon exchange. Dismissed. 

E. L. Watkins v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Complaint 
of failure of defendant company to install telephone in residence. Adjusted. 

Carolina Telephone and Telegraph Company v. Snow Hill Telephone Company. 
Apphcation for authority to disconnect lines on account of difficulty in collecting 
toll connection charges. Authority granted. 

Carolina Telephone and Telegraph Company v. Z. R. Davis. Complaint of 
inability to collect toll charges. Defendant company is authorized, with reference to 
discontinuing exchange on account of nonpayment of account, to take such action 
as is expedient in the premises, provided in the event connection is severed, a pay 
station at the Lucama Exchange is established in order that people of community 
may be in position to communicate by long distance. 

D. C. Baker v. F. C. Yarborough Telephone Company. Complaint of inadequate 
service. Complaint withdrawn. 

Judge J. Loyd Horton v. Home Telephone and Telegraph Company. Complaint 
of long distance service. Adjusted. 



118 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

Sig H. Rosenblatt v. Lowerstone Telephone Company. Complaint of failure of 
defendant company to install telephone. Telephone installed. 

Carolina Telephone and Telegraph Company v. Williamston Telephone Company. 
Application for permission to discontinue connection on account of failure of de- 
fendant company to pay indebtedness. Adjusted. 

Carolina Telephone and Telegraph Company to the Commission. Application 
for rate for private branch exchange trunk line for privately owned exchange. Rate 
approved. 

Farmers Telephone Company v. North State Telephone and Telegraph Company. 
Complaint of disconnection of service. Dismissed. 

Wofford-Terrell Company v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. 
Complaint of long distance service. It appearing that service is interfered with by 
road contractors building State highways and that this is a temporary disturbance 
and some doubt as to whether or not it can be remedied until completion of road in 
that section, and complainant being so advised, case is closed. 

T. W. Johnson v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Appli- 
cation for installation of telephone. Telephone installed. 

Mrs. J. W. Bryant v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Com- 
plaint of failure of defendant company to install telephone. Dismissed. 

Gilbert Thomas v. Weaverville Electric and Telephone Company. Complaint of 
failure of defendant company to install telephone in residence. Dismissed. 

CLAIMS HANDLED AND DISPOSED OF BY THE RATE DEPARTMENT 
OF THE CORPORATION COMMISSION FOR THE YEARS 1921 AND 1922. 

Albemarle Milling Company, flour, shipped from Albemarle to Fairmount, N. C, 
August 30, 1921, amount $1.20. No jurisdiction. 

B. F. D. Albritton and Company, Hookerton, N. C, overcharge of $6.62 on ship- 
ment of screen doors from Baltimore, Md., to Hookerton, N. C. Claim paid. 

J. F. Alexander, Creswell, N. C, claim for loss of one box tobacco by the Norfolk 
Southern Railroad Company in June, 1920, amount $8.00. Claim paid. 

W. L. Alexander, Schulls Mills, N. C, overcharge on shipment of merchandise, 
amount $1.92. Adjusted. 

Alo Furniture Company, Carthage, N. C, overcharge on shipment of furniture 
from High Point to Carthage, N. C, amount 73 cents. Claim paid. 

W. R. Allen, Goldsboro, N. C, overcharge on shipment one barrel apples from 
Hazelwood, N. C, to Goldsboro, N. C, Dec. 16, 1920, amount $1.86. Claim paid. 

J. H. Aman, Richlands. N. C, overcharge on shipment of coal from Richmond, 
Va., to Richlands, N. C, amount 62 cents. Adjusted. 

N. F. Ambrose, Creswell, N. C, claim for loss of crate of eggs shipped to N. S. 
Williams, Craddock, Va., amount $16.20. Claim paid. 

J. L. Burgess, Raleigh, N. C, overcharge on shipment of ground limestone from 
Bridgeport, Tenn., to Machael Siding, N. C, amount $36.05. Claim paid. 

Appalachian Training School, Boone, N. C, overcharge on linseed oil and paint, 
from Richmond, Va., to Boone, N. C, amount 22 cents. Claim paid. 

W. C. Arvey, Etna, N. C, loss of 4 empty chicken coops and 7 empty egg cases by 
Southeastern Express Co., amount $13.67. Coops and cases restored. 



CLAIMS AND COMPLAINTS 119 

P. R. Ashby, Raleigh, N. C, v. Southern Railway, overcharge on dump wagons 
shipped from Charlotte to Dunn, N. C, during April, 1920, amount $21.86. Claim 
paid. 

Atlantic Marl Lime and Fertihzer Corporation, New Bern, N. C, v. Seaboard Air 
Line Railway, amount $27.85. Claim paid. 

Atlantic Marl Lime and Fertihzer Corporation, New Bern, N. C, v. Atlantic 
Coast Line Railroad Co., overcharge on shipment of ground marl from Bowman, 
N. C, to Caswell, N. C. Claim dismissed. 

J. J. Anderson, Ayden, N. C, v. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Co., overcharge on 
groceries, amount $25.59. Claim paid. 

J. R. Smith and Brother, Ayden, N. C, v. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Co., 
overcharge sheeting, amount $215.00. Claim paid. 

Barnes-Harrell Company, Tarboro, N. C, v. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Co., 
loss of Karo Syrup from Wilson to Tarboro, amount 79 cents. No jurisdiction. 

W. G. Barnes, Raleigh, N. C, overcharge on one horse from Lexington, Ky., to 
Wilson Mills, N. C, amount $14.06. Claim dismissed. 

H. W. Bateman, Creswell, N. C, v. American Railway Express Co., loss of crate 
eggs, amount $16.71. Claim paid. 

Mrs. W. L. Beasley, Raleigh, N. C, v. American Railway Express Co., damage to 
chair in transit from Ridgecrest, N. C, to Raleigh, N. C, amount $35.00. Claim paid. 

T. W. Belch, Center Hill, N. C, v. American Railway Express Co., loss of 500 
plants from Johns Island, S. C, amount $6.25. Claim paid. 

Black Mountain Telephone Corporation, Black Mountain, N. C, v. American 
Railway Express Co., damage to electric meters, amount $13.36. Claim paid. 

D. J. Brock, claim against American Railway Express Co., loss of shipment of 
chickens from Mt. Airy, N. C, to Rocky Mount, N. C, amount $13.05. Claim paid. 

D. J. Brock, Rocky Mount, N. C, v. American Railway Express Co., loss of 
chickens from Mt. Airy to Rocky Mount, N. C, amount $3.00. Claim paid. 

Bryan and Bowden, Wilmington, N. C, v. Seaboard Air Line Railway, loss of 
cigarettes, amount $400.00. Claim adjusted. 

S. R. Briggs Iron and Motor Company, Williamston, N. C, v. Atlantic Coast Line 
Railroad, overcharge on car brick from Brickhaven to Williamston, N. C, amount 
$13.39. Claim paid. 

W. T. Bryant, Randleman, N. C, v. High Point, Randleman, Asheboro and 
Southern Railroad Co., amount $33.42. Closed. 

W. J. Burden, Askewviile, N. C, v. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Co., amount 
$2.08. Claim paid. 

W. J. Burden, Askewviile, N. C, v. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad, overcharge on 
lumber from Askewviile, N. C, to Norfolk, Va., amount $10.41. Claim paid. 

Cherokee Brick Company, Raleigh, N. C, v. Seaboard Air Line Railway, over- 
charge on shipment of brick from Brickhaven, N. C, to Paschal, N. C, amount 
$4.37 Claim paid. 

Cherokee Brick Company, Raleigh, N. C, v. Southern Railway, overcharge on 
brick from Brickhaven to Bryson, N. C, amount $15.00. Claim paid. 

Cherokee Brick Company, Raleigh, N. C, v. Atlantic and Western Railroad, 
overcharge on brick, amount $7.08. Claim paid. 



120 N. C. COKPORATION COMMISSION 

Campbell-Warner Co., Raleigh, N. C, v. Seaboard Air Line Railway, overcharge 
on shipment of marble from Raleigh to Littleton, N. C, amount $4.35. Claim paid. 

Cherokee Brick Co., Raleigh, N. C, v. Norfolk Southern Railroad, overcharge on 
brick from Brickhaven to Walton's Siding, N. C. , amount $3.87. Claim paid. 

Cherokee Brick Co., Raleigh, N. C, v. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Co., over- 
charge on brick from Brickhaven to Black Creek, N. C, amount $13.29. Claim 
paid. 

Cherokee Brick Co., Raleigh, N. C, v. Seaboard Air Line Railway, overcharge on 
brick from Brickhaven to Littleton, N. C, amount $15.25. Claim paid. 

Cherokee Brick Co., Raleigh, N. C, v. Norfolk Southern Railroad Co., overcharge! 
on brick from Brickhaven to Troy, N. C, amount $8.00. Claim paid. 

Cherokee Brick Co., Raleigh, N. C, v. Southern Railway, overcharge on shipment 
of brick from Brickhaven, to Bryson, N. C, amount $12.00. Claim paid. 

Christian-Ewing Company, Fayetteville, N. C, v. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad, 
overcharge on shipment of acid phosphate from Acme to Fayetteville, N. C, amount 
$7.36. Claim paid. 

Theo. S. Collins, Columbia, N. C, v. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad, damage toj 
horses shipped from Clarksville, Tenn., to Kinston, N. C. No jurisdiction. 

B. S. Courtney, Williamston, N. C, v. Norfolk Southern Railroad, overcharge on 
shipment of building material from Suffolk, Va., to WiUiamston, N. C, amount 
$36.36. Adjusted. 

Norwood Cox, Richlands, N. C, v. Dover and Southbound Railroad, overcharge 
on shipment of livestock from Enfield to Richlands, N. C, amount $8.80. Claim 
paid. 

Norwood Cox, Richlands, N. C, v. Dover and Southbound Railroad, overcharge on 
shipment of hay from Kinston to Richlands, N. C, amount $3.73. Claim paid. 

Carolina Auto Supply House, Charlotte, N. C, v. American Railway Express, 
failure to make returns on c.o.d. shipments from Charlotte to Kinston, amount 
$77.22. Claim paid. 

J. W. Cowell, Bayboro, N. C, v. Norfolk Southern 'Railroad, overcharge on ship* 
ment of flour from Bluefield, W. Va., to Bayboro, N. C, amount $45.94. Claim 
paid. 

Mrs. C. G. Cox, Jr., Richlands, N. C, v. Dover and Southbound Railroad, over- 
charge on go-cart from Chicago, 111., to Richlands, N. C, amount $3.38. Claim 
paid. 

John F. Croom, Magnolia, N. C, v. American Railway Express Co., overcharge 
on shipment of bulbs from Magnolia, N. C, to New York City, amount $8.13. Claim 
paid. 

J. A. Davis, Kenansville, N. C, v. Atlantic and Carohna Railroad, overcharge on 
hay from Liberty to Wests Siding, N. C, amount $5.00. Claim paid. 

R. A. Derby, Hoffman, N. C, v. Norfolk Southern Railroad, overcharge on live 
stock from Kansas City, Mo., to Jackson Springs, N. C, $140.94. Claim paid. 

Dewey Brothers, Goldsboro, N. C, v. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad, overcharge 
on locomotive and tender from Wilmington to Goldsboro, N. C, amount $45.54. 
Claim paid. 

W. F. Early, Aulandcr, N. C, v. Southern Express Co., goods consigned in 1918. 
No jurisdiction. 



CLAIMS AND COMPLAINTS 121 

Eastman Rubber Works, Haw River, N. C, v. American Railway Express Co., 
loss of automobile tires, amount $54.12. Claim paid. 

Miss Annie L. Eaton, Southern Pines, v. American Railway Express Co., loss 
and damage to cakes, amount $11.00. Claim paid. 

B. W. Evans, Tyner, N. C, v. Norfolk Southern Railroad Co., alleged overcharge 
on car plaster, amount $4.64. Claim dismissed. 

Z. W. Evans, Tyner, N. C, v. Norfolk Southern Railroad Co., overcharge on car 
corn from Elizabe-th City to Valhalla, N. C, amount $7.46. Claim paid. 

J. O. Ervin, Richlands, N. C, loss of barrel flour shipped from Kinston, N. C, 
amount $14.80. Claim paid. 

J. Exum Company, Snow Hill, N. C, overcharge on shipment of sugar and choco- 
late from Baltimore, Md., amount $1.35. Claim paid. 

G. H. ElUott, Bath, N. C, v. Savage, Son & Co., Inc., Norfolk, Va., loss one bale 
cotton. Adjusted. 

Fayetteville Traffic Association, Fayetteville, N. C, for W. A. Vanstory & Co., 
V. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Co. No jurisdiction. 

Rose Brothers, Fayetteville, N. C, v. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Co. No 
jurisdiction. 

De Leon M. Fields, LaGrange, N. C, v. American Railway Express Co., loss ship- 
ment of silk, amount $112.68. Claim paid. 

De Leon M. Fields, LaGrange, N. C, v. Norfolk Southern Railroad Co., damage 
to bath tub, amount $71.48. Claim paid. 

N. B. Finch & Co., Zebulon, N. C, v. Norfolk Southern Railroad Co., loss of 51 
lbs. casting, amount $1.95. Claim adjusted. 

N. B. Finch & Co., Zebulon, N. C, v. Norfolk Southern Railroad Co., loss 10 
bundles bags, amount $64.20. Claim adjusted. 

N. B. Finch & Co., Zebulon, N. C, v. Norfolk Southern Railroad Co., loss 1 bag 
coffee, amount $20.09. Claim adjusted. 

N. B. Finch & Co., Zebulon, N. C, v. Norfolk Southern Railroad Co., loss 1 bag 
milling hog feed, amount $2.88. Adjusted. 

N. B. Finch & Co., Zebulon, N. C, v. Norfolk Southern Railroad Co., miscellaneous 
claims, amount $132.40. Adjusted. 

N. B. Finch & Co., Zebulon, N. C, v. Norfolk Southern Railroad Co., loss 4 pairs 
shoes, amount $23.25. Adjusted. 

Erwin Cotton Mills, Duke and West Durham, N. C, presented by George W. 
Forrester, Atlanta, Ga., v. Durham and Southern Railway and Southern Railway, 
cotton moving during Federal control. No jurisdiction. 

Fountain and Company, Fountain, N. C, v. East Carolina Railway, overcharge 
on stalk cutters from Raleigh to Fountain, N. C, amount $2.22. Claim paid. 

R. A. Gardner & Co., Fountain, N. C, overcharge on car flour from Flint, Mich., 
to Fountain, N. C. Claim dismissed. 

Gastonia and Suburban Gas Co., Gastonia, N. C, v. Southern Railway, overcharge 
on 3 cars coke from Concord to Gastonia, N. C, amount $131.46. Claim paid. 

J. B. Gillam, Windsor N. C, v. WelHngton and Powellsville Railroad Co., amount 
$114.40. No jurisdiction. 



122 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

Goldstein & Shiffman, Greensboro, N. C., v. Southern Railway Co., overcharge 
on brick from Brickhaven, N. C., amount $2.06. Claim dismissed. 

W. H. Griffin & Sons, Goldsboro, N. C, v. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Co., loss 
shipment of coal, amount $58.02. Claim paid. 

J. J. Grimsley, Maury, N. C, v. East Carolina Railway, overcharge on brick from 
Fulton Brick Works, Va., amount $43.26. Claim paid. 

C. S. Grove, Hickory, N. C, v. American Railway Express Co., loss shipment of 
silk from Hickory, N. C, to Lebanon, Pa., amount $178.33. Claim dismissed. 

D. E. Gryder, Stony Point, N. C, v. American Railway Express Co., loss house- 
hold effects from Chase City, Va., to Stony Point, N. C, amount $49.00. 

J. W. Hager, Stony Point, N. C, v. Southern Railway, damage to lamps, amount 
$5.48. Claim paid. 

J. W. Hager, Stony Point, N. C, v. Southern Railway, loss 1 shipment shoes 
amount $11.70. Claim paid. 

J. W. Hager, Stony Point, N. C, v. Southern Railway, damage to shipment of 
hats, amount $3.50. Claim paid. 

J. W. Hager, Stony Point, N. C, v. Southern Railway, loss of cocoanuts, amount 
$2.76. Claim paid. 

J. W. Hager, Stony Point, N. C. v. Southern Railway, loss of merchandise, amount 
$8.00. Claim paid. 

J. W. Hager, Stony Point, N. C, v. Southern Railway, loss of groceries, amount 
$2.03. Claim paid. 

J. W. Hager, Stony Point, N. C, Southern Railway, damage to hats, amount 
$16.50. Claim paid. 

J. W. Hager, Stony Point, N. C, Southern Railway, loss of shipment of shoes, 
amount $31.75. Claim paid. 

C. L. Hardy, Maury, N. C, v. East Carohna Railway, overcharge on coal from 
Logan, W. Va., amount $9.94. Claim paid. 

C. L. Hardy, Maury, N. C, v. East Carolina Railway, overcharge on coal, amount 
$7.99. Claim paid. 

C. L. Hardy, Maury, N. C, v. East Carolina Railway, overcharge on car brick, 
amount $91.90. Claim paid. 

C. L. Hardy, Maury, N. C, v. East Carolina Railway, overcharge on engines, 
amount $114.42. Claim paid. 

C. L. Hardy, Maury, N. C, v. East Carohna Railway, overcharge on brick from 
Hyman Siding to Maury, N. C, amount $21.63. Claim paid. 

J. Frank Harper, Maury, N. C, v. American Railway Express Co., damage to 
shipment of drugs, amount $29.28. No jurisdiction. 

J. Frank Harper, Maury, N. C, v. American Railway Express Co., loss and damage 
claim, amount $7.30. No jurisdiction. 

R. O. Harper, Maury, N. C, v. East Carolina Railway, alleged overcharge on 
shipment of candy and cigarettes, amount $27.16. Claim dismissed. 

Harris Granite Quarries Co., Salisbury, N. C, v. Southern Railway, overcharge 
on 5 cars crushed stone from Granite Quarry to Mooresville, N. C, amount $108.66. 
Claim paid. 



I 



CLAIMS AND COMPLAINTS 123 

Harrison Wholesale Company, Williamston, N. C, overcharge on molasses from 
Wilmington to Williamston, N. C, moving in December, 1919, and January, 1920. 
No jurisdiction. 

Mrs. J. L. Hassell, Creswell, N. C, v. American Railway Express Co., loss of two 
coat suitS; amount $60.00. Claim paid. 

W. F. Hayes, Henderson, N. C, v. Seaboard Air Line Railway Co., overcharge on 
brick shipments from Brickhaven, N. C. Adjusted. 

Henderson Water Company, Henderson, N. C, overcharge on filter plates from 
City Point, Va., to Henderson N. C. Claim paid. 

Ideal Brick Co., Slocomb, N. C, v. Virginia and Carolina Southern Railroad Co., 
excessive charge on brick from Slocomb, N. C, to St. Paul, N. C, amount $33.46. 
Claim paid. 

Kendrick Brick and Tile Company, Mount Holly, N. C, v. Southern Railway 
Co., overcharge on car brick, amount $7.73. Claim paid. 

Kinston Marble Works, Kinston, N. C, v. Norfolk Southern Railroad Co., damage 
to septic tank, amount $57.36. Claim dismissed. 

E. T. Koonce, Richlands, N. C, v. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Co., overcharge 
on dental equipment, amount $7.37. Claim adjusted. 

H. B. Koonce, Richlands, N. C, v. Dover and Southbound Railroad, alleged over- 
charge on shipment of fireworks from Highlandtown, Md. Claim dismissed. 

H. B. Koonce, Richlands, N. C, v. Dover and Southbound Railroad, overcharge 
on incubator and brooders from Chicago, 111., amount $1.21. Claim adjusted. 

Laurinburg and Southern Railroad Company : application to make refund on ship- 
ment of cottonseed moving from Johns, N. C, to Raeford, N. C, amount $17.62. 
Application approved. 

Latham-Bradshaw Cotton Co., Greensboro, N. C, v. Southern Railway, over- 
charge on cotton, amount $114.27. No jurisdiction. 

Latham-Bradshaw Cotton Co., Greensboro, N. C, v. Southern Railway, over- 
charge on shipment cotton moving from Raeford to Greensboro, N. C, amount 
$242.00. Claim paid. 

Miss Evelyn Lee, Waynesville, N. C, v. American Railway Express Co., loss of 
fur scarf from Chicago, 111., amount $50.00. Claim paid. 

J. W. Lee, Merry Hill, N. C, v. Albemarle Steam Navigation Co., overcharge on 
shipment of carts from Wilson to Mount Gould, N. C, amount $2.17. Claim paid. 
• R. L. Lee, Waynesville, N. C, v. American Railway Express Co., loss shipment 
shoes from Milwaukee, Wis., amount $193.65. Claim paid. 

Lillington Brick Co., Raleigh, N. C, v. Seaboard Air Line Railway Co., overcharge 
on brick, amount $107.78. Claim paid. 

Lillington Brick Co., Raleigh, N. C, v. Townsville Railroad Co., overcharge on 
brick, amount $151.71. Claim paid. 

Lillington Brick Co., Raleigh, N. C, v. Norfolk and Western Railway Co., over- 
charge on brick, amount $22.40. Claim paid. 

Lillington Brick Co., Raleigh, N. C, v. Norfolk and Western Railway Co., over- 
charge on brick, amount $28.01. Claim paid. 

F. J. McGuire, Norfolk, Va., v. Norfolk Southern Railroad Co., overcharge on 
livestock from Hertford to Hamlet, N. C. Adjusted. 



124 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

Joseph McConnaughey Co., Battleboro, N. C, v. American Railway Express Co., 
damage caused by delay in shipment wagons by freight and express from Winston- 
Salem to Kingsboro, N. C, amount $79.69, during February, 1919. No jurisdiction. 

J. G. McCormick, Wilmington, N. C, v. American Railway Express Co., complaint 
as to service and routing. Adjusted. 

J. G. McCormick, Wilmington, N. C, v. American Railway Express Co., loss of 
cantaloupes shipped from Maxton, N. C, to Asheville, N. C, amount $1.50. Claim 
dismissed. 

A. A. McDonald, Lillington, N. C, v. Norfolk Southern Railroad Co., overcharge 
on lumber shipments from Angier to Lillington, N. C, amount $10.50. Claim paid. 

H. R. Mcintosh, Hayesville, N. C, v. American Railway Express Co., loss of 
poultry shipped from Andrews, N. C, to Greensboro, N. C, amount $18.34. Claim 
paid. 

H. R. Mcintosh, HayesvillQ, N. C, v. American Railway Express Co., loss of 
coops, amount $3.20. Claim paid. 

H. R. Mcintosh, Hayesville, N. C, v. American Railway Express Co., loss of 
chickens shipped from Murphy, N. C, to Tampa, Fla., amount $53.50. Claim paid. 

H. R. Mcintosh, Hayesville, N. C, v. American Railway Express Co., loss of 
chicken coops shipped from Asheville, N. C, amount $1.75. Claim paid. 

Mcintosh Grocery Company, Newbern, N. C, v. Norfolk Southern Railroad Co., 
amount $90.00. No jurisdiction. 

Mcintosh Grocery Company, Newbern, N. C, v. Norfolk Southern Railroad Co., 
amount $41.00. No jurisdiction. 

McKinney Brothers, Louisburg, N. C, v. Seaboard Air Line Railway Co., over- 
charge on shipment of brick from Brickhaven, N. C, to Louisburg, N. C, amount 
$10.94. Claim paid. 

A. W. McNair, Tarboro, N. C, v. Pullman Company, overcharge on berth from 
Tarboro to Wilmington, N. C, amount 81 cents. Claim paid. 

Franklin McNeil, Raleigh, N. C, v. Seaboard Air Line Railway Co., damage to 
potatoes in transit from Laurel Hill to Raleigh, N. C, amount $20.00. Claim paid. 

Manufacturers' Freight Department, Rockingham, N. C, v. Aberdeen and Rock- 
fish Railroad Co., miscellaneous claims, amount $260.01. Claims paid. 

H. G. Mayo, Aurora, N. C, v. Washington and Vandemere Railroad Co., amount 
$10.70. Claim paid. 

Mecklenburg Lumber Company, v. Southern Railway System, penalty charge, 
amount $30.90. Claim dismissed. 

Mixer & Company v. Southern Railway, overcharge on lumber from Winnabow, 
N. C, to Raleigh, N. C. Adjusted. 

Mixer & Company, Buffalo, N. Y., v. Southern Railway, refund of penalty charge 
on car lumber shipped from Bowden to Durham, N. C, during February, 1920, 
amount $100.00. Refund refused. 

Morrison Brothers, Wests Mill, N. C, v. Tallulah Falls Railway, loss of shoes in 
transit from Lynchburg, Va., amount $57.50. Claim paid. 

Moore Hardware Co., Carthage, N. C, v. Randolph and Cumberland Railroad 
Co., overcharge on 12 shipments hardware during 1917-1920, amount $156.17, 
No jurisdiction. 



CLAIMS AND COMPLAINTS 125 

Charles Moody Company, Charlotte, N. C, v. Seaboard Air Line Railway, 
storage -and war tax on shipment of hay during June, 1920. Claim dismissed. 

W. A. Myatt & Company, Raleigh, N. C, v. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Co., 
overcharge on car of corn from Washington to Raleigh, N. C. Adjusted. 

A. H. Nixon, Asheville, N. C, v. American Railway Express Co., and South- 
eastern Express Co., damage to sewing machine in transit from Chicago, 111., to 
Asheville, N. C. No jurisdiction. 

Thomas S. Norfleet, Scotland Neck, N. C, v. Norfolk Southern Railroad Co., 
overcharge on shipment of horses from Elizabeth City to Kelford, N. C, amount 
$7.40. Claim paid. 

Mrs. G. A. Overton, Creswell, N. C, v. American Railway Express Co., loss of 
eggs in transit from Creswell, N. C, to Baltimore, Md., amount $15.00. Claim 
paid. 

Pamlico Chemical Co., Washington, N. C, v. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad, over- 
charge on shipment of cotton from Bayboro to Washington. Claim paid. 

Parker Brothers & Company, Raleigh, N. C, v. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Co., 
overcharge on shipment of cotton from Smithfield to Duke, N. C, amount $168.14. 
Claim paid. 

M. C. Patrick, Creswell, N. C, v. Norfolk Southern Railroad, loss of shipment of 
peas from Creswell, N. C, to New York City, amount $38.50. Claim paid. 

M. C. Patrick, Creswell, N. C, v. American Railway Express Co., loss of half box 
fish shipped from Creswell, N. C, to Norfolk, Va., amount $30.00. Claim adjusted. 

Peebles Brothers, Raleigh, N. C, v. Southern Railway, damage to shipment of 
flour, amount $251.75. Claim paid. 

Z. V. Peed, Cherokee Brick Co., v. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad, overcharge on 
several shipments of brick from Brickhaven to Rocky Mount, N. C, Overcharges 
refunded. 

W. T. Phelps, Creswell, N. C, v. Norfolk Southern Railroad, loss of barrel of 
potatoes shipped from Creswell, N. C, to New York City, amount $5.70. Claim 
paid. 

Philhps Lumber Company, Winston-Salem, N. C, v. Southern Railway, claim 
for refund of penalty charges on shipment lumber from Wilmington to Winston- 
Salem, N. C, amount $250.00. Overcharges refunded. 

J. O. Plott, Canton, N. C, v. Southern Railway, overcharge and damage to ship- 
ment of canned goods from Lakeland, Fla., amount $192.42. Claim paid. 

Proximity Manufacturing Company, Greensboro, N. C, v. Southern Railway, 
overcharge on shipments of cotton from Dunn to Greensboro, N. C, amount $68.56. 
Claim paid. 

Republic Sales Truck Co., Kinston, N. C, v. American Railway Express Co., 
claim for c.o.d. shipment from Kinston to Goldsboro, N. C, amount $75.00 
Claim adjusted. 

Reidsville Paper Box Company, Reidsville, N. C, v. Southern Railway, overcharge 
on car of mixed freight from Reidsville to High Point, N. C. Claim paid. 

0. L. Rhodes, Wilmington, N. C, v. American Railway Express Co., damage to 
bees and beehives in transit from Calypso to Wilmington, N. C, amount $32.50. 
Claim dismissed. 



126 N. C. CORPOKATION COMMISSION 

M. L. Rice, Chenoah, N. C, v. American Railway Express Co., miscellaneous 
claims amounting to $45.75. Adjusted. 

Monroe Robbins, Guilford College, N. C, v. Atlantic and Yadkin Railroad, over- 
charge on shipment of household goods from Mount Airy to Battleground, N. C, 
amount $17.30. Claim paid. 

City of Rocky Mount, N. C, v. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad, reparation claim 
on shipments of coke from Brownsville, Pa., to Rocky Mount, N. C, amount 
$1,230.98. Claim adjusted. 

J. J. Rogers, Ivy, N. C, v. Southern Railway, damage to shipment of earthen- 
ware in transit from St. Louis, Mo., to Asheville, N. C, amount $16.08. Claim 



Scotland Neck Brick Co. v. East Carolina Railway, overcharge on two shipments 
of brick from Scotland Neck, to Maury, N. C, amount $22.53. Claim paid. 

Scotland Neck Brick Co., v. Atlantic Coast Line Railway, overcharge on shipment 
of brick from Scotland Neck to Patrick Siding, N. C, amount $18.75. Claim 
paid. 

W. W. Shores v. Eastern Tennessee and Western North Carolina Railroad, repa- 
ration claim on shipment of logs from Minneapolis to Elk Park, N. C, amount 
$97.17. Certificate furnished for adjustment of claim. 

J. S. Siler & Co., Raleigh, N. C, v. Southern Railway, loss caused by delay to 
shipments of sugar, amount claimed $2,130.13. Amount paid $1,780.13. 

W. J. Smith & Son, Oriental, N. C, v. Norfolk Southern Railroad, loss of caps in 
transit from Richmond, Va., to Oriental, N. C. No jurisdiction. 

Smith & Yelverton, Fountain, N. C, v. East Carohna Railway, overcharge on 
paper tablets from Tarboro to Fountain, N. C, amount $2.60. Claim paid. 

F. P. Spruill, Creswell, N. C, v. Norfolk Southern Railroad Co., claim for loss of 
six barrels potatoes shipped from Creswell, N. C, to New York City, amount $51.34. 
Claim paid. 

C. C. Sparrow, Aurora, N. C, v. Norfolk Southern Railroad, overcharge on ship- 
ment potatoes from West Alliance to Washington, D. C, amount $7.50. Claim 
paid. 

C. C. Sparrow, Aurora, N. C, v. Norfolk Southern Railroad Co., overcharge on 
shipment potatoes from East Alliance, N. C, to Washington, D. C, amount $12.60. 
Claim paid. 

C. C. Sparrow, Aurora, N. C, v. Norfolk Southern Railroad, overcharge on ship- 
ment potatoes from Grants, N. C, to Chicago, 111., amount $4.19. Claim paid. 

Steele's Mills, Rockingham, N. C, v. Randolph and Cumberland Railroad, loss of 
coal confiscated, amount $701.58. No jurisdiction. 

D. M. Stallings, Richlands, N. C, v. Southern Railway, damage to shipment 
household goods from Rutherfordton, N. C, to Richlands, N. C, amount $68.50. 
Claim paid. 

State Hospital, Goldsboro, N. C, v. Southern Railway, overcharge on shipment 
of coal from Burwell, W. Va., to Goldsboro, N. C, amount $28.52. Claim paid. 

State Hospital, Goldsboro, N. C, v. Southern Railway, loss of coal, amount $92.65. 
Claim paid. 



CLAIMS AND COMPLAINTS 127 

R. K. Stewart, High Point, N. C, v. Southern Railway, overcharge on ship- 
ment of brick from Brickhaven to High Point, N. C, amount $6.84. Claim 
dismissed. 

S. W. Sykes, Columbia, N. C, v. Norfolk Southern Railroad Co., alleged shortage 
in shipment potatoes. Claim denied. 

Tidewater Audit Company, Norfolk, Va., alleged overcharge on shipments moving 
from Cliffs, N. C, to Durham, N. C, during Federal control. No jurisdiction. 

Tidewater Audit Company, Norfolk, Va., v. Southern Railway, overcharge on 
shipment of sand moving from Mount Holly to Durham, N. C, during Federal 
control. No jurisdiction. 

•Miss EUzabeth W. Thompson, Raleigh, N. C, v. American Railway Express Co., 
damage to bookcase, amount $80.00. Claim paid. 

Triplett Lumber Company, Charlotte, N. C, v. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Co., 
overcharge on shipment lumber, amount $15.21. Claim paid. 

W. C. Thurston, Burlington, N. C, v. Southern Railway, overcharge on shipment 
shingles from Apex to Burlington, N. C. Refunded. 

W. H. Trott, Richlands, N. C, v. Dover and Southbound Railroad, overcharge on 
shipment velvet beans from Davidson, Ga., to Richlands, N. C, amount $3.01. Re- 
funded. 

G. S. Tucker & Co., Raleigh, N. C, v. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Co., over- 
charge on shipment of rocking chairs from Asheboro to Wilson, amount $1.00. Claim 
paid. 

H. C. Tucker, West Jefferson, N. C, v. Norfolk and Western Railroad, complaint 
of backhaul, rates on lumber, assorting and reshipment northbound. Adjusted. 

J. W. Tussey, Lexington, N. C, v. Southern Railway, overcharge on shipment of 
brick from Brickhaven to Lexington, N. C, amount $13.45. Claim paid. 

Wake County Cotton Seed Company, Raleigh, N. C, v. Seaboard Air Line Rail- 
way, damage to shipment cottonseed from Cary to Raleigh, N. C, amount $46.00. 
Claim denied. 

L. F. Watson, Lucama, N. C, v. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Co., overcharge on 
shipment hmestone from Bridgeport, Tenn., to Black Creek, N. C, amount $19.15. 
Claim paid. 

Wilson Wholesale Company, Wilson, N. C, v. East Carolina Railway, damage to 
phonograph, amount $64.11. No jurisdiction. 

Wilson Wholesale Company, Wilson, N. C, v. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Co., 
rate on iron roofing. No jurisdiction. 

A. White, Winfall, N. C, v. Norfolk Southern Railroad, overcharge on barrel of 
vinegar shipped from Norfolk, Va., to Winfall, N. C, amount 74 cents. Claim 
paid. • 

G. L. Whitfield, Frankhnton, N. C, v. Seaboard Air Line Railway, overcharge 
on shipments of brick from Goldsboro to Franklinton, N. C. Adjusted. 

J. T. Wilkinson & Co., Aurora, N. C, v. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad, loss of 
shipment dry goods from Baltimore, Md., to Aurora, N. C. Adjusted. 

Wood Grocery Company, Selma, N. C, v. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad, over- 
charge on shipment sugar bag cloth from Philadelphia, Pa., to Selma, N. C, amount 
$48.92. Overcharge refunded. 



128 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

Frank Wood, Edenton, N. C, v. Norfolk Southern Railroad, overcharge on ship- 
ment lumber from Edenton, to Nags Head, N. C, amount $3.83. Claim paid. 

G. F. Woodley, Creswell, N. C, v. Norfolk Southern Railroad Co., loss of clover 
seed shipped from CHmax to Creswell, N. C, amount $26.40. Claim paid. 

C. V. York, Raleigh, N. C, v. Seaboard Air Line Railway Co., overcharge on two 
cars of brick shipped from Brickhaven to Southern Pines, N. C, amount $25.40. 
Claim paid. 



FREIGHT RATES 



NORTH CAROLINA EXCEPTION SHEET, No. 5 

TO 

SOUTHERN CLASSIFICATION 

(As Published in Consolidated Classification, No. 2) 

Supersedes North Carolina Exception Sheet, No. 4. Applies to freight traffic 
between points within the State of North CaroUna. Applicable to all transporta- 
tion companies. Subject to change on legal notice. Issued August 24, 1922, 
effective September 8, 1922. 

GENERAL RULES 

Minimum Charge. — The minimum charge for small shipments shall be for actual 
weight at the tariff rates, but not less than 50 cents for any single shipment. 

When a less than carload shipment moves under a rate made by a combination 
of separately established rates in the absence of a joint through rate, the minimum 
charge of fifty (50) cents will apply to the continuous through movement and not 
to each of the separately established factors. 

Rule to Prevent Overloading of Car With Forest Products 

Cars containing lumber and articles taking lumber rates may be loaded in excess 
of the marked capacity to the extent of ten per cent of the said marked capacity, 
provided that said ten per cent does not exceed 4,000 pounds, and cars so loaded will 
be charged for at the regular carload rating, but if the weight in excess of marked 
capacity of car exceeds 4,000 pounds, the transportation company may decline to 
accept same for transportation until the load has been lightened to conform to the 
rule as above. 

In order to arrive at weights, it will be the duty of shippers to furnish transportation 
companies information as to the contents of cars, the quantity, kind, dimension, and 
condition (whether green or dry), so that an estimate can be made of the weight by 
use of the classification giving estimated weights. 

This rule applies only at points where scale weights are unobtainable. 

Allowance for Weight of Standa'rds, Strips, and Supports on Flat Cars 
Loaded with Lumber 

Allowance for weight of standards, strips, and supports on flat cars loaded with 
lumber shall be as follows: 

(a) Allowance of 500 lbs. per car will be made for weight of standards, strips, and 
supports on carload shipments of lumber loaded on flat or gondola car, but in no case 
must less than the minimum carload weight specified in tariffs be charged for on 
each car. 

(b) In computing freight charges under this rule agents will deduct 500 lbs. from 
the gross weight of each carload; then subtract the tare weight (the weight of car), 
and extend freight charges on basis of remainder, which is the net weight, subject 
to the minimum carload weight specified in tariffs. 

Carload Minimum Weight on Grain and Grain Products 

The carload minimum weight on Grain and Grain Products, except flour, in 
straignt or mixed carloads when in packages will be 30,000 pounds. When in 
bulk, minimum weight as shown in Classification and Exceptions governing rates 
will apply. 

Estimated Weights When Actual Weights Are Not Ascertained 

Except where otherwise shown in individual items, when the actual weight of the 
article named below is not ascertained at point of shipment, or at destination, or in 
transit, the following estimated weights shall govern: 



130 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

Article Weight 

Clay, per cubic yard 3,000 lbs. 

Gravel, viz: 

Washed, per cubic yard 2,800 lbs. 

Other than washed, per cubic yard 3,200 lbs. 

Green Seasoned 

Laths, Cypress or Yellow Pine, per 1,000 900 lbs. 550 lbs. 

Laths, other than Cypress or Yellow Pine, per 1,000 750 lbs. 500 lbs. 

Lumber, per 1,000 feet, viz.: 
Rough, viz.: 

Ash (black) 5,000 lbs. 3,500 lbs. 

Basswood and Butternut 4,000 lbs. 2,750 lbs. 

Chestnut, Cottonwood and Cypress 5,000 lbs. 3,000 lbs. 

Gum (red) 1 5,000 lbs. 3,750 lbs. 

Elm (soft) 5,000 lbs. 3,500 lbs. 

Gum (sap) 5,000 lbs. 3,250 lbs. 

Hemlock 4,000 lbs. 3,000 lbs. 

Hickory 6,000 lbs. 5,000 lbs. 

Oak 6,000 lbs. 4,500 lbs. 

Poplar 4,000 lbs. 3,000 lbs. 

Yellow Pine, under 6 inches in thickness 5,000 lbs. 4,000 lbs. 

Yellow Pine, 6 inches and over in thickness 4,500 lbs. 4,000 lbs. 

White Pine 4,000 lbs. 2,750 lbs. 

N. O. S 6,000 lbs. 4,000 lbs. 

Note. — Rough lumber less than one inch in thickness to be 
assessed on a proportionate basis of above. 

Dressed, viz.: 

Cypress, Gum, Poplar, and Yellow Pine, viz.: Green Seasoned 

3-8-in. Ceiling 1,000 lbs. 

1-2-in. Ceiling 1,300 lbs. 

5-8-in. Ceiling or Partition 1,600 lbs. 

3-4-in. Ceiling or Partition 2,000 lbs. 

13-16-in. Ceiling, Partition, or Flooring 2,200 lbs. 

Drop Siding 2,200 lbs. 

Shiplap and Tongued and Grooved Boards, M-in 2,300 lbs. 

Shiplap and Tongued and Grooved Boards, 13-16-in 2,500 lbs. 

Siding, Bevel, from 1-in. stock * 1,100 lbs. 

Siding, Bevel, from 13^-in. stock 1,400 lbs. 

Siding, Square Edge, from lj<^-in. stock 1,600 lbs. 

13-16-in. Boards 2,600 lbs. 

N. O. S 4,000 lbs. 2,750 lbs. 

Sand, per cubic yard 3,000 lbs. 

Shingles, green, per thousand 600 lbs. 

Shingles, seasoned, per thousand 500 lbs. 

Staves, Headings, or Hoop Poles, green, car loaded to depth of fort}'- 

three inches, per car 30,000 lbs. 

Staves, Headings, or Hoop Poles, seasoned, car loaded to depth of fifty 

inches, per car ^ . 30,000 lbs. 

Stone, not dressed, per cubic foot 160 lbs. 

Tan Bark, green, per cord .- 2,600 lbs. 

Tan Bark, seasoned, per cord 2,000 lbs. 

Telegraph Poles, Fence Posts, or Rails, per cord 3,500 lbs. 

Turpentine, in barrels, per barrel containing not over 52 gallons (the 
weight of each gallon in excess of 52 gallons to be computed on basis 

of 7.2 lbs. per gallon) 432 lbs. 

Wood, green, per cord 3,500 lbs. 

Wood, seasoned, per cord 3,000 lbs. 



Rates named in tariffs applying between points in North Carolina are governed hy the 
Southern Classification with the exceptions contained herein. 



FREIGHT RATES 131 

Explanation of Characters 

1 Stands for First Class. S Stands for Special. 

2 Stands for Second Class. S. U Stands for Set Up. 

3 Stands for Third Class. L. C. L Stands for Less Than Carload. 

4 Stands for Fourth Class. C. L Stands for Carload. 

5 Stands for Fifth Class. N. O. S Stands for Not Otherwise Specified. 

6 Stands for Sixth Class. K. D Stands for Knocked Down. 

13^ Stands for 13^ Times First Class. O. R. B Stands for Owner's Risk of Breakage. 

Dl Stands for Double First Class. O. R. L Stands for Owner's Risk of Leakage. 

3T1 Stands for Three Times First Class. O. R. C Stands for Owner's Risk of Chafing. 

4T1 Stands for Four Times First Class. 

A, B, C, D, E, F, H, K, L, M, N, O, and P stands for Classes A, B, C, D, E, F, H, K, L, M, N, O, and 

P, respectively. 

Ratings 
Acid Phosphate and Dissolved Bone; same as Fertilizer. 
Agricultural Implements, C. L., viz.: 

Beans, Plow, loose or in pkgs., 24,000 lbs. min A 

Handles, Plow, loose or in pkgs., C. L, 24,000 min P 

Agricultural Implements, L. C. L. : 

Cotton Choppers; same as Cultivators. 

Cultivators, K. D., packed 4 

Diggers, Potato; same as Plows, N. O. S. 

Drills (two-horse), Grain, S. U 1 

Harrows of all kinds and Harrow Frames 4 

Harvesters and Pickers, Cotton 1 

Manure Spreaders, S. U 1 

Mills, Sorghum 4 

Mowing and Reaping Machines, Binders and Harvesters, whether com- 
bined or separated, S. U 1 

Planters, Potato; same as Plows. 

Plow Handles, boxed, crated, or in bundles A 

Plow Beams, in bundles A 

Plow Singletrees 5 

Plows, Gang and Sulky, K. D 4 

Plows, N. O. S., set up 2 

Same, K. D 4 

Presses, Cider, Hay, and Cotton, K. D 4 

Rakes, Wheeled, other than hand, S. U 1 

Tedders, Hay, set up, L. C. L. 1 

Asbestos Products, viz.: 
Millboard: 

In boxes or crates or in burlapped rolls, L. C. L 4 

In packages named, carload min. wt. 30,000 lbs 5 

Packing : 

Compounded or reinforced, braid or wick not compounded nor rein- 
forced, in bales or burlap rolls or in barrels or boxes, L. C. L 4 

Same, car-load, in packages named, minimum wt. 30,000 lbs 5 

Roofing, in rolls, crated or in cases, any quantity 6 

Ashes, Cotton-seed; same as FertiHzer. 

Ashes, Tan-bark; same as Fertilizer. 

Backhands, made of cotton webbing; see Dry Goods. 

Bags: 

Burlap or Gunny, new or old, in bags or bundles, bales, boxes, or rolls, 

L. C. L 6 

Cotton, new or old, clayed or other than clayed, in bales, boxes, barrels, 

or bundles, L. C. L 5 

Paper, in bales, boxes, bundles, or crates, L. C. L 6 

Bark, viz.: 

Ground in bags A 

Tan, packed, L. C. L., 20 per cent higher than Class K. 
Tan, C. L., minimum when cars of 36 feet in length or over are used, 
24,000 lbs.; cars under 36 feet in length, 20,000 lbs. Lumber rates. 
Bark Extract, for tanning only, C. L., 36,000 lbs. min 6 



132 N. C. COKPOKATION COMMISSION 



Ratings 



Barrel Material (cooperage stock), Lumber rates. 

Barrels, Half-barrels, and Kegs, empty, wooden, tight-cooperage, estimated 

weight 75 lbs. each, L. C. L 5 

Barrels, empty, wooden, C. L., min. wt. 10,000 lbs 6 

Barrels, empty, iron or steel, estimated weight 100 lbs. each, L. C. L 5 

Baskets, Tobacco, wood splint, without tops or handles, nested, in bundles 

or not less than three baskets, L. C. L 2 

Blinds, Doors, and Frames, L. C. L 4 

Same, C. L., min. wt. 24,000 lbs 6 

Blocks, Concrete Building, L. C. L K 

Same, C. L., per car 25,000 lbs P 

Boiler or Pipe Covering, asbestos, felt, or magnesia, separate or combined, 
in blocks, forms, or sheets: 

In barrels, boxes, or crates, L. C. L 5 

Loose or in packages, C. L. 24,000 lbs. minimum 6 

Box Material or Shooks, wooden, for the manufacture of packing cases or 
crates (not including cigar-box material); same as Common Lumber. 
Boxes, empty, viz.: 

Packing cases or crates, old, which were orginially filled with paper boxes 

for knitting factory products, L. C. L 4 

Paper, nested (two or more), packed in wooden boxes or crates, L. C. L. 2 

Paper, not nested, packed, L. C. L 13^ 

Paper, folding, K. D., packed L. C. L 3 

Paper, packed, C. L., min. wt. 10,000 lbs 4 

Brick: 

Common, in barrels, boxes, or crates, with or without tops, less car- 
load (see Note), 20 per cent higher than car-load. 

Note.— Shipments of common brick will be accepted loose, owners to load and un- 
load, only when in quantities of 20,000 pounds or over: Provided, that shipments may 
be accepted in quantities of less than 20,000 pounds and charged or at weight of 
20,000 pounds. 

Brick, hollow, and Tile, Building and Roofing, in straight or mixed, C. L., 

min. wt. 30,000 lbs K 

Brimstone (sulphur), same as Fertilizer when for use as Fertilizer. 
Building Material, wooden, consisting of Lumber, rough or dressed. Laths, 
Shingles, Window and Door Frames, Sash (glazed or not glazed). 
Doors (glazed or not glazed). Blinds (glazed or not glazed). Carpenter's 
Mouldings, Balusters, Baseboards, Casings, Porch Columns, Newels, 
Stairwork or Wainscoting, mixed C. L., per car 20,000 lbs. (see Note) O 

Note. — The above classification will not apply on straight or mixed carloads of 
sash, doors, and blinds only. 

Burlap, same as bags, burlap. 
Canned Goods, viz.: 

Fish, Oysters, Fruits, Vegetables, and Meats, in metal cans, packed in 

boxes, crates, or barrels, L. C. L 4 

Cans, empty, roving, leatheroid, fiber, paper, or tin, for cotton or woolen 
mills, in straight C. L., or with mixed C. L. of cotton or woolen mill 

machinery, min. wt. 24,000 lbs • 6 

Casings; Lumber rates. 
Ceiling, wooden; Lumber rates. 
Cement, viz.: 

Cement, in bags, actual weight; in barrels, estimated weight: Portland, 

400 lbs.; N. O. S., 300 lbs. per barrel, car-loads, 40,000 lbs. min..__ K 

N. O. S., in barrels or sacks, L. C. L., 20 per cent higher than C. L. rates. 
Cement, in bags or barrels, and Lime, in barrels, mixed, C. L., min. wt. 

40,000 lbs.; same as Cement, C. L. 
Plaster; same as Cement. 
Roofing; see Roofing. 
Charcoal, Wood, viz.: 

Charcoal, C. L., min. wt. 24,000 lbs L 

In cloth sacks, barrels, or casks, L. C. L A 



FREIGHT RATES 133 

Ratings 
Cheese, packed in wood 4 

Cigarettes, viz.: 

In wooden boxes, strapped or with end rabbeted 2 

In fibreboard or strawboard packages (as described in Rule 41, Consoli- 
dated Classification No. 2), with all flaps firmly glued and further 
sealed with paper sealing strip covering the box where the outer flaps 
meet, or when secured as provided for in Item 1, Note 2, paragraphs C 

and D, page 125, Consolidated Classification No. 2, or reissues 2 

In boxes, N. O. S l}i 

Cigars, boxed and strapped, corded and sealed, with cording passing through 

each and every board and over each and every seam, in boxes 1 

Cinders, coal, per car 25,000 lbs. P 

Clay, viz.: 

Fire, L. C. L., packed 1 K 

Same, per car 25,000 lbs P 

N. O. S., in boxes, barrels, casks, or sacks, L. C. L 6 

N. O. S., C. L., per car 20,000 lbs O 

Coffin Stock, wooden, K. D., manufactured of pine, poplar, or other common 

woods, dressed, but not further finished, in crates or bundles, L. C. L. 6 

Same, C. L., 24,000 lbs. min A 

Cooperage Stock; Lumber rates. 

Cornices and Ornamental Work for Buildings, made of sheet or stamped 

metal, plain galvanized, or painted, boxed or crated, L. C. L 1 

Cotton, viz.: 

Cotton, in the boll, in bags or in bulk, C. L., min. wt. 20,000 lbs 6 

Same, in bags, L. C. L. 3 

Unginned, packed in bags, 2,000 lbs. and over, L. C. L 5 

Cotton Goods. See Dry Goods. 

Cotton-seed Hulls and Meal, mixed, or in mixed car-loads, or in less than 

car-loads; same as Fertilizer. 
Cotton-seed Hulls, Meal, Ashes, and Oil Cake; see Fertilizers. 
Cotton Sweepings, Clippings, Motes, or Card Strippings in bales (refuse of 
of cotton spinning factories, knitting mills, or cotton-seed oil mills, 

cotton-gin flues) , except in bags A 

Cross-arms, wooden; same as Lumber. 
Cross-ties; Lumber rates. 
Dry Goods, viz.: 

Cotton Factory Products, in the original piece, made wholly of cotton, 
in bales, O. R. of chafing, or packed in rolls covered with burlap, or in 
boxes, viz.: Backbands made of cotton webbing, Calicoes, Cambrics, 
glazed; Canton Flannels, plain or dyed* Canvas, Cottonades, Checks, 
domestic; Cheviots, domestic; Cotton Bags, Cotton Bagging (including 
brown cotton bagging), Cotton Towels, Cotton Waste, Crash,, linen or 
cotton; Denims, Drills, Duck, Ginghams, domestic; Jeans; Jeans, cor- 
set; Kerseys, Osnaburgs, Plaids, Rope, Sack Material, Sheetings, 
bleached or brown; Shirting, Silesia, Stripes, domestic; Teazle Cloth, 

Tickings, Twine, Warp, Webbing, backband; Wicking 5 

Same, unless conditions as above named are complied with; same as Dry 

Goods, N. O. S. 
Yarn, cotton, on beams, wrapped, owner's risk of damage to beam heads, 

and so stated in bill of lading 5 

Yarn, cotton, in bales or boxes or on beams wrapped and in boxes or crates 5 

Felts, cotton (not batting), in bales 5 

Hosiery, cotton 5 

Excelsior, wood, pressed in bales, C. L., min. wt. 20,000 lbs.; Class O plus 

10 per cent. 
Fertilizer Material, viz.: 
Ammonia, sulphate of; Blood, dried; Bones; Castor Pomace, in bags; 
Potash, muriate of; Potash, sulphate of; Fish Scrap; Slate, rotten; 
Soda, nitrate of; Sylvinit; Hoof Meal, in bags or bulk; Manure, bat. 



134 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

Fertilizer Material— Ammonia — Continued. Ratingti 

bird, or sheep; Manure Salts, in bags or in bulk; Tankage; Acid Phos- 
phate, in bulk; Kainit, in bulk; Hardsaltz, in bulk; min. C. L. 25 tons 
or 50,000 lbs.; 10 per cent less per ton than the rate on Fertilizer. 
Same, L. C. L.; Fertilizer rates. 
Fertihzer, C. L., min. wt. 30,000 lbs.: 

Fertilizers. — This term embraces the following and like articles: Am- 
monia sulphate, bone black, bone, ground or dissolved; castor pomace, 
or fish scrap, guanos, altovella, fish, Navassa, Navassa lump, Peruvian 
soluble Pacific, nitrate cake, plaster of Paris; potash, German salts of, 
muriate of, sulphate of; salt, cake, lump, and ground phosphate; soda, 
nitrate of and sulphate of; tank stuff. For additional articles taking 
Fertilizer rates, see Southern Classification. 
Fertilizers, L. C. L., packed, 20 per cent higher than car-load. 
Fish, viz.: 

Dry, dried, salted, or smoked, in bulk, in barrels, boxes, or crates 5 

Fresh, packed, collect, freight guaranteed by shipper, L. C. L 2 

Fresh, in refrigerator cars, C. L., min. wt. 24,000 lbs.; Q}4 cents per 100 
lbs. higher than Class B. 

Pickled or salted, in barrels, half-barrels, kegs, or kits 6 

Flooring; Lumber rates. 
Flour, viz.: 

N. O. S., in sacks, estimated weight in one-half barrel sacks, 98 lbs.; in 
one-fourth-barrel sacks, 49 lbs.; in one-eighth-barrel sacks, 243^ lbs.; 
except that when actual weight is clearly shown to be less, only actual 
weight is to be charged for. Shipments of flour in any except usual 
size sacks as named above, in all cases to be charged for at actual weight. 
Bills of lading and way-bills must show number of sacks of such weight 

contained in shipment C 

Fruit, dried, L. C. L., viz.: 

Apples, Pears, and Peaches, packed 4 

Berries, N. O. S 4 

Fruit, green, viz.: 

Apples, in bags, barrels, boxes, or crates, L. C. L 5 

Blackberries and Dewberries, packed for wine purposes, C. L., minimum 

24,000 lbs 6 

Same, L. C. L . 5 

Berries, other than Cranberries, packed, prepaid 1 

Grapes, in casks or barrels, for wine purposes, L. C. L 5 

Grapes, in casks or barrels, for wine purposes, C. L., min. wt. 24,000 lbs. 6 

Furniture, C. L., viz.: 

Chairs, finished, K. D., C. L., min. wt. 24,000 lbs 5 

Chairs, in the white, K. D., C. L., min. wt. 24,000 lbs 6 

Chairs, Settees, and Stools, N. O. S., C. L., min. wt. 10,000 lbs 4 

Chair Stuff or Stock, N. O. S., parts not joined together, in the rough or 

in the white, min. wt. 30,000 lbs 6 

Chair Stock, wood, viz.: Bent arms, in crates or bundles, brace arms, 

in sacks, in the rough, any quantity A 

Safes or Cupboards, kitchen, K. D. or S. U., C. L., 16,000 lbs. min 4 

N. O. S., min. wt. 12,000 lbs 4 

Furniture, all kinds, finished or in the white, taking Fourth Class or lower 

when in straight car-loads; in mixed car-load, 12,000 lbs. min 4 

Furniture, L. C. L., viz.: 

Bedsteads, N. O. S., wrapped or crated 3 

Bureaus and Chiffoniers, wrapped or crated 3 

Chairs, N. O. S., S. U 1 

Chair Stock, wood; viz.: Bent arms in crates or bundles, brace arms in 

sacks, in the rough, any quantity ^ A 

Cots, K. D. or folded 3 

Cribs, K. D. or folded 3 

Desks and Seats, school, S. U. or folded 3 

Same, K. D 4 



FREIGHT RATES 135 

Furniture, L. C. L. — Continued. Ratings 

Desks, N. O. S., wrapped or crated-.-. 2 

Racks, Hat, wrapped or crated, S. U 1 

Sofas, N. O. S., and Tete-a-tetes, wrapped or crated 1 

Stands, hall, wrapped or crated 3 

Tables, K. D., flat 3 

Table Legs, Slides, Leaves, and Supports 3 

Wardrobes, wrapped or crated, K. D : 3 

Washstands, wrapped or crated 3 

Furniture, not included in foregoing list, viz.: 

Bookcases, S. U., wrapped or crated 1 

Chairs, wood, with case splint, rattan, reed, willow, bamboo or solid 

wooden seats, whether manufactured of common or hardwood, S. U__ 1 

Same, K. D., boxed, crated, or wrapped in bundles 2 

Chairs, barber, dental, or surgical, S. U., boxed or crated 134 

Furniture, Store, C. L., viz.: Counters and Shelving (not glass), knocked 

down, C. L. min. 20,000 lbs '. 4 

Mattresses, cotton, excelsior, fibre, shoddy, shuck or straw 3 

Springs, bed and furniture, compressed and packed in barrels, casks, or 

boxes 3 

Springs, bed, spiral or coil, compressed and crated 3 

Stands, revolving, display, wooden: Table Rims (not veneered), packed 

or securely tired together A 

Ginseng, in barrels or boxes 1 

Glass and Glassware, viz.: 

Bottles, Carboys, or Demijohns, old; Old bottles, ginger ale or other non- 
alcoholic beverages in barrels, bottle carriers, or boxes, L. C. L 6 

Fruit Jars, common, packed, L. C. L 4 

Mirrors, viz.: 

Over 3 feet, not exceeding 7x12 feet, packed 2 

Three feet or under, packed 3 

Showcases entirely boxed (not taken unless entirely boxed) 134 

Window Glass, viz. : Common, L. C. L 4 

Glucose Refuse or Gluten Meal, when shipped to fertilizer manufacturers, 
C. L. : same as Fertilizer. 

Grain : 

In bulk, C. L., 40,000 lbs. min D 

Corn on Cob, in shuck, in bulk, C. L., 30,000 lbs. min D 

Graphite, crude, C. L., per car 25,000 lbs P 

Gravel, C. L., min. wt. 40,000 lbs.; 40 per cent less than class L. 

Grits, in bags; same as Cornmeal. 

Hay, Fodder, and Straw, pressed in bales, L. C. L 6 

Heading and Heading Bolts; Lumber rates. 

Hominy in bags; same as Meal, corn. 

Hoop Poles; Lumber rates. 

Hoop Splits; Lumber rates. 

Hoops, N. O. S.; Lumber rates. 

Husks or Shucks, compressed in bales, L. C. L 6 

Ice, prepaid or guaranteed, C. L., min. wt. 24,000 lbs. (see Note) L 

Note. — With shipments of ice in C. L. lots, 1,000 lbs. of sawdust, chaff, or other pack- 
ing will be allowed free. 

Ice, L. C. L., packed, prepaid or guaranteed; 100 per cent per 100 lbs. 

higher than C. L. 
Iron and Steel Articles (not boxed or crated unless so specified), viz.: 

Bars, grate (each shipment weighing 200 lbs. or over in one or more 

pieces), L. C. L A 

Castings, viz.: 

In boxes, kegs, barrels, casks, or crates (not machinery or sewing ma- 
chines) 5 

Unpacked (not machinery, parts thereof), each piece weighing under 200 

lbs 5 

Castings, weighing over 200 lbs. ; see Special Iron. 



136 N. C. CORPOEATION COMMISSION 

Iron and Steel Articles — Continued. Ratings 

Covers, man-hole, packed and contents described, or in bundles, wired. _ 5 

Dog Irons, cast; same as Castings. 

Flue, iron; same as Sheet Iron. 

Forgings; same as Castings. 

Iron, sulphate of, shipped to fertilizer factories; see Fertilizers. 

Lathing, expanded iron . 5 

Nails, in boxes (horse and mule shoes) 5 

Picks, in bundles, barrels, or kegs; see Special Iron. 

Pipe Joints or Fittings, consisting of Elbows, Traps, Tees, Crosses, Bush- 
ings, Plugs, Couplings, and Caps (made entirely of iron, and without 
brass of other trimmings or fixtures (see Note), packed or not packed, 
L. C. L 6 

Same, C. L., see Special Iron. 

Note.— The above ratings will apply on Elbows, Traps, Tees, and Crosses, with brass 
screw clean-out plugs or brass or bronze stay-rods. 

Rails, iron or steel, any quantity A 

Safes, viz.: 

Each weighing over 3,000 lbs. and not over 6,000 lbs 3 

Each weighing 3,000 lbs. or less 4 

Scrap Iron, packed or loose, C. L., min. wt. 40,000 lbs K 

Same, packed, L. C. L A 

Sheet Iron, viz.: 

Cut in strips for stove pipe, nested flat and crated 6 

Plain, Galvanized, or Corrugated 6 

Iron and Steel, Special, consisting of the following articles: 

Note. — Commodity rates on "Special Iron" will apply on all articles enumerated in 
the following list. In the absence of commodity rates, Class A rates will apply. 

Architectural and Structural, consisting of Columns, Pedestals, Capitals, 
Saddles, Door and Window Jambs, Plates, Sills, Studding, Lintels, 

Rolled Beams, Angles, Channel Bars, Girders, and Tees or Zees A 

Axles, car A 

Axles, carriage or wagon, loose or wired together A 

Bar, Band, Hoop, Rod, Plate (not planished or polished), Boiler, all un- 
packed A 

Bar, steel, or steel bars, polished or not polished, packed or unpacked. _ A 

Bolts, Nuts, Rivets, and Washers, packed or in bags or bundles A 

Boxes and Skeins, vehicle, in kegs, barrels, or casks A 

Boxes and Skeins, wagon, axle, loose, owners to load and unload, C. L.__ A 

Bridge Material A 

Castings (not machinery or parts thereof), each piece weighing 200 lbs. 

or over, unpacked, O. R. B A 

Castings or Forgings, parts of compresses, each piece weighing 2,000 lbs. 

or over, owners to load and unload A 

Castings, C. L., viz.: Castings, rough, N. O. S. (not machinery nor parts 
thereof, nor sewing machines nor parts thereof, nor stove castings), 

packed in kegs, barrels, or loose A 

Chains, in barrels or casks A 

Chains, loose or in coils A 

Crowbars A 

Draft Iron A 

Elevator Weights A 

Filings, iron A 

Fishbars, Fastenings, and Rail Braces : A 

Frogs, railroad A 

Harrow Teeth, in kegs or barrels A 

Jail Plate A 

Lap Rings A 

Mattocks, in bundles, barrels, or kegs A 

Nails and Spikes, in kegs, estimated weight 106 lbs. per keg A 

Nails and Spikes, in double kegs, estimated weight 208 lbs. per keg A 

Nails, cement coated, in kegs A 



FREIGHT RATES 137 

Iron and Steel, Special — Continued. Ratings 

Nails, wire, in kegs, estimated weight 106 lbs. per keg A 

Nails, wire, in double kegs, estimated weight 208 lbs. per keg A 

Picks, in bundles, barrels, or kegs A 

Pipe, cast, released A 

Pipe, lined with cement, released A 

Pipe Joints or Fittings, consisting of Elbows, Traps, Tees, Crosses, Bush- • 
ings. Plugs, Couplings, and Caps (made entirely of iron, and without 
brass or other trimmings or fixtures), (see Note under Pipe Fittings, 

L. C. L.), packed or not packed, C. L A 

Pipe Fittings, wired in bundles, C. L A 

Pipe, wrought, released A 

Plow Clevises, Couplers, Frogs, Heel Bolts, Moulds, or Plant Fenders 

(in bundles, or in kegs, barrels, or casks). Plates, Points, and Wings. _ A 

Plow Steel A 

Poles, electric light or railway A 

Post, fence, railroad A 

Rust, iron A 

Sadirons, in barrels or casks, released A 

Sadirons, in boxe^, contents to be plainly marked on boxes, and contract 

to be made by shipper that no other articles shall be put in the boxes A 

Sash Weights, unpacked A 

Shoes, horse, mule, and ox, in kegs (estimated weight 106 lbs. to keg) _ _ A 

Stand Pipes, K. D A 

Staples, fence, in barrels or kegs A 

Timber Hangers A 

Tires, wagon A 

Trucks, car A 

Wheels, car 1 A 

Wire, fence, iron (not woven), on reels or in coils, loose or packed in barrels, 

O. R. of wet and rust A 

Note. — On mixed car-loads of iron fence wire and nails the car-load rate on the high- 
est classed article may be applied. . 

Tubs, viz.: 

Tubs, bath ■ 3 

Tubs, galvanized iron, closely nested 3 

Vises 4 

Kainit, when shipped to fertilizer factories; see Fertilizer Material; when in 
less than 25-ton shipments. Fertilizer rates apply. 

Knitting Factory Products, made wholly of cotton, in bales, O. R. C, or in 
boxes when specific name of article and shippers name are plainly 
marked on outside of package and stated in receipt of bill of lading 5 

Laths; Lumber rates, (see Note.) 

Note. — In the absence of scale weights the following estimated weights will apply: 

Laths, green, per 1,000 530 lbs. 

Laths, dry, per 1,000 450 lbs. 

Leather, in bales or rolls or boxes, L. C. L 3 

Lime, viz.: 

In casks or barrels, L. C. L. ; 20 per cent higher than C. L 6 

Acetate of, L. C. L 6 

Same, C. L.; same as Fertilizers. 
Carbonate of, in barrels or casks; same as Lime. 
Chloride of, in barrels or casks 6 

In barrels, C. L.; min. wt. 24,000 lbs., actual weight to be charged for; 

Class K less 10 per cent. 
In barrels, and Cement in bags or barrels, mixed C. L., min. wt. 40,000 

lbs.; same as Cement, C. L. 
Sacked, for agricultural purposes, in bulk or bags; 20 per cent less than 
Fertilizers. 
Lime Rock, ground; 20 per cent less than FertiHzer. 

Live Stock, subject to Rules, Estimated Weights and Valuation of Southern 
Classifications. 



138 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

Ratings 

Live Stock, C. L., per car 20,000 pounds N 

Live Stock, L. C. L 4 

Locks, viz. : Padlocks and Rim-locks 3 

Lumber, native wood, rough or dressed (see Note), C. L. 24,000 lbs. min._ P 

Lumber, native wood, rough or dressed (see Note), L. C. L.; 20 per cent 

higher than Class K. 
Lumber, Laths and Shingles, in mixed C. L., Lumber rates. 

Note. — In the absence of scale weights the following estimated weights will be used: 

Short-leaf rough pine lumber, seasoned, per 1,000 feet 3,300 lbs. 

Rough spruce lumber, seasoned, per 1,000 feet 2,600 lbs. 

Rough spruce lumber, green, per 1,000 feet 3,000 lbs. 

Machinery and Machines, C. L., viz.: 

N. O. S., all kinds, boilers, engines, or parts thereof, min. wt. 24,000 lbs. 6 

Machinery and Machines, L. C. L., viz.: 
Cotton and Woolen Mill Machinery, viz.: 

Beams, wooden, warp, cylinders, spools, bobbins, and shuttles, old 6 

Bobbins, Shuttles, and Spools, wooden, packed 5 

Card Flats, old 6 

Rollers, iron and steel to be repaired or recovered, rating to a^ply to both 

directions 4 

Engines and Machinerv, hoisting 4 

Pulleys I .------ 5 

Pulley Wheels and Blocks, manufactured wholly of iron, wired in 

bundles 4 

Marl, C. L., min. wt. 40,000 lbs.; 10 per cent higher than rate on Sand. 
Marl or Green Sand, L. C. L. (not taken in bulk), 80 per cent of less car- 
load Fertilizer rate. 
Meal, viz.: 

Soy or Soja Bean; Fertihzer rates. 

Corn, N. O. S., except when in paper packages (see Note) D 

Note.— L. C. L. shipments of meal, in cloth bags, each package weighing less than 21 
pounds, will not be accepted unless enclosed in burlap, jute, or duck bags. Bills of 
lading and way-bills for shipment of meal in bags must show number of bags of each 
size, weighing 21 pounds or over, and the number of burlap, jute, or duck bags con- 
taining bags weighing less than 21 pounds contained in the shipment. 

Linseed-oil Meal; same as Meal, Cotton-seed; see Fertihzers. 
Meats, all shipments to be charged at actual weight, viz.: 

Fresh, packed or wrapped, L. C. L 3 

Sausage, fresh, packed 4 

Sausage, smoked, packed, L. C. L 6 

Sausage Casings, in barrels or kegs 4 

Tongues, pickled, in barrels or kegs B 

Tripe, pickled, in barrels or kegs B 

Melons, prepaid, in barrels with cloth or slatted wooden tops; in baskets 

with solid or slatted wooden tops; or in barrels, boxes, or crates, L. C. L. 5 

Melons, C. L., per car 20,000 lbs O 

Mica, viz.: Mica, scrap and ground, in bags or barrels, L. C. L 5 

Molasses, viz.: 

Shipments of molasses will be accepted at an estimated weight of 12J^ 
lbs. per gallon, including package, the gallonage to be taken from the 
marks on the barrels as stenciled bj^ authorized gangers. 

In barrels or hogsheads 6 

In tank cars, C. L., subject to Rule 35, Southern Classification 6 

Marble and Granite (other than Gravestones, Tombstones, Monuments, 
or parts thereof) : 
Blocks or Slabs, marble, slate, granite, or stone, polished or carved wholly 

or in part, in boxes or crates, L. C. L 4 

Same, C. L., min. wt. 30,000 lbs - 6 

Blocks, or Slabs, marl)le, slate, granite, or stone, rough quarried, not 
packed; also, sawed, sand-rubbed (or slushed), hammered, or chisel- 
ed, boxed or crated, L. C. L A 

Same, C. L.: when blocked in or on cars, per car 30,000 lbs P 



FREIGHT RATES 139 

Marble and Granite — Continued. Ratings 

Chips or Cubes, rough or dressed for inlaid or mosaic tiling, L. C. L 6 

Stone, crushed or rubble, in packages or in bulk, C. L., min. wt. 40,000 
lbs. ; 40 per cent less than Class L. 

Monuments, Gravestones, and Tombstones, viz.: 

Marble or granite, not boxed Dl 

Marble or granite, all kinds, N. O. S 1 

Marble, granite, cement, or concrete, including parts of monuments, 
gravestones (lettered or not lettered, but not sculptured), and not 

including statuary, in boxes or crates, L. C. L 4 

Same, C. L., min. wt. 30,000 lbs 6 

Mouldings, carpenter's without ornamentation; Lumber rates. 

Nuts, packed in double bags, boxes, or barrels, viz.: 

Chestnuts, L. C. L 5 

Peanuts and Chufas, L. C. L 5 

Walnuts and Hickory Nuts, L. C. L 5 

Oatmeal, Rolled Oats, or Shredded Oats, in boxes, barrels, kegs, or drums 6 

Oils, viz.: 

Cotton-seed in barrels, crude, L. C. L A 

Cotton-seed, in barrels, C. L., 30,000 lbs. min A 

Cotton-seed, in tanks, governed by the following rules, viz.: 

1. Rates when in tank cars will be assessed on basis of shell capacity in gallons, multi- 
plied by l]/2 lbs. per gallon. 

2. Tank cars must invariably be loaded to their full capacity, subject to a min. wt. of 
24,000 lbs. 

In tank cars, C. L A 

Creosote or Dead Oil, in barrels or tanks, C. L 6 

Same, in barrels, L. C. L 4 

Oil, Petroleum and Petroleum Products (notes and estimated weights as per 
Consolidated Classification) : 
Crude Oil, Distillates, Fuel Oil, Gas Oil, Grease (not axle), Refined 
(illuminating or burning) Oil, Lubricating Oil (not axle grease), 
Miners' Oil, Paraffin Oil, Paraffin Wax, Road Oil, Soap Oil, Trans- 
former Oil, and Wood Oil, Benzine, Gasoline and Naphtha, viz.: 

In cans, boxed, C. L 4 

In bulk in wooden, iron or steel barrels, L. C. L *4 

In packages named, C. L. 26,000 min *6 

In tank cars, C. L., min. shell capacity of tank based on 6.6 lbs. per gal. 6 

Paper, viz.: 

Glazed, for manufacture of paper boxes or for wrapping purposes, in boxes, 

crates, rolls, or bundles 6 

Printing, in boxes, crates, rolls, or bundles, L. C. L 6 

Roofing, in rolls, bundles, or crates 6 

Strawboard and Pulpboard; same as Paper, wrapping. 

Wall, in bundles, boxes, or crates 3 

Wrapping or Lining, in bundles, rolls, or crates, L. C. L 6 

Paving Blocks, wooden; Lumber rates. 
Peas, viz.: 

Dried or split, in boxes, bags, or barrels D 

Same, in packages or bulk, C. L., 36,000 lbs. min D 

Pickets, wooden; Lumber rates. 
Pickles, viz.: 

In buckets or pails, wooden, L. C. L 4 

In kegs, barrels, or casks, L. C. L 5 

Piles; Lumber rates. 
Pipe, viz.: 

Earthen and concrete, drain or roofing (pipe and tile), L. C. L 6 

Same, C. L., minimum weight 26,000 lbs., subject to packing require- 
ments attached to Class A rating in Southern Classification (J. E. 
Crosland's I. C. C. No. 9, supplements thereto or reissues thereof) _ _ A 



*Will not apply on Benzine, Gasoline, Naphtha or Petroleum Liquified Gas in wooden 
barrels. 



140 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



Ratings 



Pipe — Continued. 

Earthen or concrete, farm drain, or sewer, C. L. per car 25,000 lbs., subject 
to packing requirements attached to Class A rating in Southern Class- 
ification (J. E. Crosland's I. C. C. No. 9, supplements thereto or re- 
issues thereof) P 

Same, L. C. L K 

Pipe, sewer, earthen or concrete, and fixtures; flues, flue linings, flue tops 
and chimney caps, and drain tile, earthen or concrete; in mixed car- 
loads, per car 25,000 lbs., subject to packing requirements attached 
to Class A rating in Southern Classification (J. E. Crosland's I. C. C. 
No. 9, supplements thereto or reissues thereof); 25 per cent higher 
than Class P. 

Pitch, in barrels or casks, N. O. S., C. L. 40,000 lbs. min K 

Planks or Boards, edges glued together; Lumber rates. 
Plaster, viz.: 

Calcined, C. L., 40,000 lbs., min K 

Calcined, L. C. L., 20 per cent higher than C. L. rate. 
Cement; same as Cement. 
Land; same as Agricultural Lime. 

Plaster of Paris, L. C. L 6 

Same, C. L., 40,000 lbs. min A 

Wall, in bags or barrels, C. L., 36,000 lbs. min.; Class K, less 10 per cent. 
Wall, in bags, barrels or boxes, L. C. L., 20 per cent higher than C. L. rate. 
Plates, viz.: 

Wooden, including Wooden Butter Dishes and Plates, C. L., min. wt. 

15,000 lbs 6 

Wooden Plates or Dishes, nested, packed in crates or boxes, L. C. L 5 

Poles, viz.: 

Hoop; same as Lumber. 
Telegraph and Telephone; Lumber rates. 
Porch Columns, wooden; same as Blinds, Doors, and Frames. 
Post, fence; Lumber rates. 
Potash, muriate and sulphate, when shipped to fertilizer factories; see 

Fertilizers. 
Preserves, Fruit Butter, and Jellies, viz.: 

In glass, packed, L. C. L 3 

In wood, L. C. L 4 

In cans, boxed, L. C. L 4 

Pumps and Pump Material, viz.: 

Steam Pumps, Pumping Engines, and Machinery, L. C. L 4 

Wooden Tubing, loose or in packages, L. C. L 5 

Rags, viz.: 

In bags or bales, not machine pressed, L. C. L 3 

In barrels, crates, or hogsheads, L. C. L 4 

Railroad Rolling Stock Equipment: 

Locomotives, standard gauge, on their own wheels, subject to the follow- 
ing rules: 

Basis for Calculation of Freight. — Mileage rates between points governed by this Ex- 
ception Sheet will be computed upon the basis of the shortest all-rail standard-gauge 
mileage by available routes of transportation, plus actual arbitraries, subject to a 
minimum distance of 75 miles for each line, and governed by the mileage shown in 
individual mileage tariffs of carriers, parties to this Exception Sheet, lawfully on file 
with the Interstate Commerce Commission. 

Locomotives and Tenders, moved by their own power, owner to furnish 
fuel and crew, carrier to furnish pilot at expense of owner, 19 cents 
per mile. 

Locomotives and Tenders, dead, or on their own wheels, connecting rods 
and small parts liable to be damaged, at option of carrier, to be taken 
off and boxed, 25 cents per mile. All expenses for oil, waste, and re- 
pairs are in addition to the rates, and will be at the expense of the 
owner. 

Locomotives and Tenders, loaded wholly on flat cars, 313^ cents per mile. 



FREIGHT RATES 



141 



Railroad Rolling Stock Equipment — Continued. Ratings 

Locomotives, loaded on flat cars and weighing less than 40,000 lbs., same 
as Machinery, N. O. S. 

Roofing, viz.: 

Cement in metal cans, in barrels or boxes, or in tubs, kits, pails, or barrels, 

L. C. L 5 

Slate, in boxes or crates, L. C. L 6 

Slate, C. L., min. wt. 40,000 lbs K 

Roots and Herbs, all kinds, in bags, boxes, or barrels, L. C. L 4 

Roots, ivy, C. L., per car 24,000 lbs P 

Rosin, in barrels, L. C. L., 20 per cent higher than Class K. 

Rosin, in barrels, C. L., 36,000 lbs. min K 

Rosin Dross; apply Rosin rates. 

Salt, viz.: 

In bags, boxes, or barrels, L. C. L K 

In bulk, in bags, boxes or barrels, C. L., 40,000 lbs. min. (see Note) O 

Note.— Where Class O rates are stated in cents per 100 lbs. the minimum car-load 
weight on salt will be 40,000 lbs. Where the Class O rates are stated per car the rate 
on salt will be double Class O per car of 40,000 lbs. 

Salt Cake; see Fertihzers. 

Sand, C. L., per car 25,000 lbs P 

Sash, viz.: 

Glazed, in boxes or crates, L. C. L 4 

Glazed, in packages named, C. L., min. wt. 24,000 lbs 6 

Unglazed, in boxes, or crates, C. L., min. wt. 16,000 lbs 6 

Unglazed, in boxes or crates; same as Blinds. 
Sawdust, C. L., per car 24,000 lbs P 

Screens, viz.: 

Door or Window, of wire, in bundles, boxes, or crates, L. C. L 4 

Door or Window, of wire, C. L., min. wt. 18,000 lbs 6 

Sea Grass, Sea Weed, or Salt Hay, pressed in bales, C. L., 20,000 lbs. min.; 

20 per cent less than Class D. 
Shingle Bolts; Lumber rates. 
Shingles, wooden; Lumber rates. (See Note.) 

Note.— In the absence of scale weights the following estimated weights will apply: 

Shingles, green, per 1,000 350 lbs. 

Shingles, dry, per 1,000 300 lbs. 

Shooks, boxed or crated (not including cigar box material) ; Lumber rates. 

Shooks, barrel, cask, or hogshead; Lumber rates. 

Siding; Lumber rates. 

Showcases; see Glass and Glassware. 

Slush Soap Stock, or similar material for manufacturing soap, in barrels; 

same as Cotton-seed Oil. 
Soap Stock; same as Cotton-seed Oil. 
Soda, viz.: 

Nitrate of, L. C. L.; same as Fertilizers, L. C. L. 

Nitrate of, C. L.; see Fertilizers and Fertilizer Material, C. L. 

Sulphate of, C. L.; same as Fertilizers, C. L. 
Spoke Timber, in the rough; Lumber rates. 
Staves and Stave Bolts; Lumber rates. 
Stoves and Ranges, cast iron, L. C. L. Box and crate requirements will 

not apply. 
Sugar, in barrels or hogsheads, or in cartons or sacks packed in boxes, or in 

single (see Note) or double sacks 6 

Note. — Ratings will apply when the bag is made of cotton cloth weighing not less than 
5. 6 ounces per square yard and having not less than 96 threads to the square inch, in- 
cluding warp and filling, and of tensile strength not less than 61 pounds in the warp 
and 68 pounds in the filling or of Osnaburg (Cotton Cloth) not less than 7 ounces to 
the square yard and having not less than 68 threads to the square inch, including 
warp and filling, and of tensile strength not less than 61 pounds in the warp and 68 
pounds in the filling, or when the bag is made of single cropped and mangled or double 
calendered burlap weighing not less than \Q}/2 ounces per yard, 40 inches wide, and 
counting not less than 11 porter (warp) and 12 shots (filling), tensile strength to be 
not less than 61 pounds in the warp and 68 pounds in the filling. Tensile strength to 
be determined by what is commercially known as the strip test. 



142 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

Ratings 
Sumac, viz.: 

Leaf, C. L., min. wt. 20,000 lbs K 

Same, in bags or bales, L. C. L 5 

Tallow, in barrels or boxes B 

Tankage, for fertilizer purposes, C. L.; see Fertilizer. 
Tank Material; same as Box and Barrel Material. 

Tar, Coal, in barrels, L. C. L A 

Same, C. L., 40,000 lbs. min K 

Tar, in barrels, L. C. L., 20 per cent higher than Class K. 

Tar, in barrels or casks, C. L., 40,000 lbs. min K 

Tar Residuum; same as Tar, 

Tar, Coal, in tank cars, minimum weight capacity of tank to be charged for 

at estimated weight of 83^ pounds per gallon K 

Teeth, harrow; Iron and Steel Articles. 

Telegraph Cross-arms, without insulator pins or brackets; Lumber rates. 

Ties, railroad; Lumber rates. 

Tile, viz.: 

Drain and Roofing; see Pipe. 

Building and Roofing and Hollow Brick, in straight or mixed C. L., min. 

wt. 30,000 lbs K 

Timber, N. O. S.; Lumber rates. 
Tin, viz.: 

Tin and Terne Plate, in boxes, charged at actual weight, L. C. L 5 

Tin Roofing, in rolls, crates, or boxes, L. C. L 5 

Tobacco, viz.: 

Smoking 2 

Unmanufactured, in boxes, barrels, crates, bales, or baskets 4 

Unmanufactured, in hogsheads or tierces 5 

Unmanufactured, loose in car on the stick, C. L., min. wt. 10,000 lbs.__ 4 

Tobacco Box Material; see Box Material. 

Tobacco Trash, Sweepings, or Stems, ground or unground, packed L. C. L., 
or in bulk when in car-loads: Fertilizer rates. 

Tongues, deer, in bags, bales, or boxes, L. C. L 5 

Twine, viz. : Jute, packed, L. C. L 5 

Vegetables, not canned or desiccated, viz.: 

Beets, in barrels, bags, baskets, boxes, or crates 6 

Cabbages, in bags, baskets, boxes, or crates, L. C. L 6 

Cabbages, in packages named or in bulk, C. L., 24,000 lbs. min 6 

Carrots, in barrels, bags, baskets, boxes, or crates 6 

Cucumbers; same as Beets. 

Onions, in sacks, L. C. L 5 

Onions, in barrels, baskets, boxes, or crates, L. C. L 6 

Potatoes, in crates, or sacks, L. C. L 6 

Potatoes, in barrels, bags, baskets, boxes, or crates, L. C. L 6 

Turnips, in barrels, bags, baskets, boxes, or crates, L. C. L 6 

N. O. S., packed, prepaid or guaranteed 3 

Vehicles, viz.: 

Carriages, Buggies, and Trotting Wagons, viz.: 

K. D., boxed or well crated, box or crate not exceeding 34 inches in 

heigth, L. C. L 2 

Boxed or well crated, C. L., min. wt. 10,000 lbs 4 

Loose, C. L., min. wt. 15,000 lbs 3 

Vehicles, Horse Drawn, viz.: 

Trucks or Wagons, Farm, with or without bodies and without springs. 

Bodies K. D., or flat, or without bodies, gears K. D., loose L. C. L. 4 

Trucks or wagons, delivery, with springs (see Note.) 

Loose, actual weight subject to minimum charge of 1,000 pounds 
each, at first class rate, L. C. L. D-1 

Note. — Delivery cart and wagons, with springs, cover the type of light vehicles com- 
monly used by retail merchants for delivering packages, but will not cover heavy 
teaming vehicles. 



FREIGHT RATES 14:S 

Ratings 
Vehicle Material and Parts of Vehicles, viz.: 

Bodies, finished, carriage, buggy, trotting wagon, and wagon; same as 

Carriages, Buggies, Trotting Wagons, and Wagons, respectively. 
Bodies and Seats, unfinished; see Wheels. 

Hubs, packed in rolls or securely tied together A 

Rims, packed or securely tied together A 

Shafts, Bows, Felloes, Singletrees, Spokes, Hubs, and Rims, wood, un- 
finished, L. C. L 5 

Spokes, in the rough, packed in bundles A 

Same, C. L., loose or in bundles P 

Wheels, unfinished, L. C. L 4 

Lumber or Veneer, native wood: 

Less than one-eighth inch in thickness, in boxes or crates, L. C. L 4 

Loose or in packages, C. L.; Lumber rate plus 20 per cent. 
Wheelbarrows, viz.: Iron or wood, K. D., trays nested and strapped, 

wheels and handles packed separately, L. C. L 4 

Wood: 

Built-up, native wood, in boxes or crates, L. C. L 6 

In bundles, boxes, or crates, C. L.; Lumber rates, plus 20 per cent. 
Same, straight or mixed, C. L.; Lumber rate, plus 20 per cent. 
Wool, viz.: 

In bags, two or more securely corded together or pressed in bales 3 

Unwashed, in bags 4 

Circular 229. 



RULES FOR THE GOVERNMENT OF FREIGHT STATIONS OF COMMON 
CARRIERS WITHIN THE STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA. 

Freight stations of common carriers in North Carolina must be kept open each 
day (Sundays and legal hohdays excepted) for the receiving and dehvery of freight, 
for a period of nine hours between the time of sunrise and sunset, which period is to 
include one hour off for lunch. (See Note.) 

Common carriers are hereby required to keep on file with the Corporation Com- 
mission, information showing the hours of service being observed at each freight 
station, and provide a placard at such stations giving similar information. 

Note. — At stations where there is more than one employe, the time for luncheon 
should be so arranged as to prevent the closing of the station for lunch hour. 

These rules shall be in force and effect on and after January 1, 192L 

By order of the Commission: • R. O. Self, 

Raleigh, N. C, November 24, 1920. Clerk. 



CORPORATION COMMISSION v. COMMON CARRIERS 
BY RAIL IN NORTH CAROLINA. 

In order to clarify an apparent misconception on the part of the common carriers 
of the State as to the proper method for arriving at correct rates now applicable on 
certain commodities named in Agent Kelly's Freight Tariff No. 228, I.C.C. U.S-1 
when handled on combination rates over two or more lines within the State, it is 

Ordeeed, That the rules and arbitraries set out in Agent Kelly's Freight Tariff 
No. 228, I.C.C. U.S.-l for arriving at combination rates on the commodities named 
in said tariff shall, until further ordered, apply to intrastate traffic in North Caro- 
lina. It is 

Further ordered, That the principles for arriving at combination rates as set 
out in the said tariff are to be applied in connection with legally established rates of 
the carriers in this State, that is, after statutory deductions (when required) for joint 
traffic have been made. (See Note). It is 

—10 



144 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



Further ordered. That these rules shall apply to rates made on combination 
between all common carriers by rail within the State. 

Note.— First deduct the arbitraries shown in Kelly's Tariff, then apply statutory 
deductions, after which add back arbitraries as per Kelly's Tariff. 



By order of the Commission: 
March 24, 1921. 

Circular No. 219 

Cancels Circular blank Number dated December 2, 



R. O. 



Self, 
Clerk. 



1920. 



RATES ON SAND AND LOAM SOIL IN STRAIGHT OR MIXED CARLOADS, 
CL MINIMUM WEIGHT 40,000 POUNDS, IN CENTS PER TON, 2,000 
POUNDS. 



Distance 



Carload 
Rate 



Distance 



Carload 
Rate 



7 miles 

12 " 

17 " 

22 " 

27 " 

32 " 

37 " 

42 " 

47 " 

52 " 

57 " 

62 " 

67 " 

72 " 

77 " 

82 " 

87 " 

92 " 

97 " 

100 " 

110 " 

120 " 

130 " 



and under 

" over 7. 
12. 
17. 
22. 
27. 
32. 
37. 
42. 
47. 
52. 
57. 
62. 
67. 
72. 
77. 



87. 

92. 

97. 
100. 
110. 
120. 



57^ 

65 

723^ 

77y2 

85 

90 

100 
100 
100 

107H 
107^ 
1071^ 
112^ 
112>4 

n2y2 

120 

120 

120 

125 

125 

I32y2 

137M 



140 miles and over 130 

150 ' 140 

160 " " " 150 

170 " " " 160 

180 " " " 170 

190 " " " 180 

200 " " " 190 

210 " " " 200 

220 " " " 210 

230 " " " 220 

240 " " " 230 

250 " " " 240 

260 " " " 250 

270 " " " 260 

280 ' 270 

290 " " " 280 

300 " " " 290 

320 " " " 300 

340 " " " 320 

360 " " " 340 

380 " " " 360 

390 " " " 380 

400 " " " 390 



1371^ 

145 

145 

150 

150 

1571^ 

1571/2 

162H 

I6214 

170 

170 

170 

175 

175 

175 

I8214 

182H 

187H 

195 

200 

207H 

212H 

212H 



Applicable for single line haul to all* common carriers by rail of the State, except 
where other specific rates are approved by the Commission. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

June 28, 1921. Clerk. 

Circular No. 223. (Reissue Current Rates.) 
Cancels Circular No. 221. 

Cancelled by Circular 224, Nov. 25, 1921, and 
Circular 224 cancelled by Circular 234, July 1, 1922, 



FREIGHT EATES 



145 



FREIGHT RATES ON COAL AND COKE. 

The freight rate on coal and coke in cents, per ton of 2,000 pounds, carload mini- 
mum 30,000 pounds, will be as follows: 



Distance 


Carload 
Rate 


Distance 


Carload 
Rate 


5 miles and under 


79 
102 
102 
113 
113 
■ 124 
124 
135 
147 
158 
158 
158 
158 
158 
169 
169 
169 
169 
180 
180 
180 
180 
192 
192 


150 miles and over 140 


192 


10 " 


' over 5 

10 


160 " 
170 " 
180 " ' 
190 " 
200 " 
210 

220 " 
230 " ' 
240 " 
250 " 
260 " 
270 " 
280 " 
290 " 
300 " 
310 

320 " 
330 " 
340 " ' 
350 

360 " ' 
370 " 
380 " ' 


" 150 


192 


15 " 


" 160 


203 


20 " 


15 

" 20 

25 


" 170 


203 


25 ' 


" 180 


203 


30 " 


" 190 


214 


35 " 


30 


" 200 


214 


40 " 


"35- - . - - 


" 210.- 


214 


45 " 


40 


' " 220 • 

" 230 

' " 240 

" 250 

' " 260 

" 270 

" 280 


225 


50 " 


45 


225 


55 " 


50 


225 


60 " 

65 " ' 

70 " 

75 " 


" 55 

' " 60 

" 65 

' " 70 

75 


225 
237 
237 
237 


80 " 


" 290 


248 


85 " 


' " 80 

85 


" 300 


248 


90 " 


" 310 


248 


95 " 


90- 


" 320 - . 


259 


100 " 


95 


' " 330 

' 340 

' " 350 

" 360 

" 370 


259 


110 " ' 
120 " 


" 100 

" 110 


270 
270 


130 " * 
140 " 


" 120 

•" 130 


282 
282 



Applicable for single line haul to all common carriers of the State except where 
other specific rates are approved by the Commission. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

July 1, 1922. • ' Clerk. 

Circular No. 230. 
Cancels Circular No. 216. 



146 



N. C. CORPOKATION COMMISSION 



RATES ON COTTON SEED AND COTTON SEED HULLS CARLOAD 20,000 
POUNDS MINIMUM IN CENTS PER TON 2,000 POUNDS. ' 



Distance 





L.C.L. 


C.L. 


Packed 


Rate 


Rate 


90 


102 


102 


124 


113 


147 


113 


147 


124 


158 


124 


158 


135 


169 


135 


169 


147 


180 


147 


180 


147 


180 


158 


180 


158 


192 


158 


192 


158 


203 


158 


203 


169 


214 


169 


214 


180 


225 


180 


225 


180 


225 


180 


225 


192 


237 


192 


237 


203 


248 


203 


248 


203 


259 



Distance 



C.L. 

Rate 



L.C.L. 

Packed 

Rate 



7 miles and under. 



12 
17 
22 
27 
32 
37 
42 
47 
52 
57 
62 
67 
72 
77 
82 
87 
92 
97 
100 
110 
120 
130 
140 
150 
160 
170 



over 7- 
12- 
17- 
22- 
27. 
32. 
37. 
42. 
47. 
, 52. 
57. 
62. 
67. 
72 _ 
77_ 
82. 
87. 
92_ 
97 _ 
100 _ 
110_ 
120 _ 
130. 
140. 
150. 
160. 



180 miles 

190 

200 

210 

220 

230 

240 

250 

260 

270 

280 

290 

300 

310 

320 

330 

340 

350 

360 

370 

380 

390 

400 

410 

420 

430 

440 

450 



and over 170 

" 180 

" 190 

" 200 

" 210 

" 220 

" 230 

" 240 

" 250 

" 260 

" 270 

" 280 

" 290 

" 300 

" 310 

" 320 

" 330 

" " 340 

" 350 

" 360 

" 370 

" 380 

" 390 

" 400 

" 410 

" 420 

" 430 

" 440 



203 

214 
214 
214 
214 
214 
225 
237 
237 
237 
237 
248 
248 
259 
259 
259 
259 
270 
270 
270 
270 
282 
282 
293 
293 
293 
293 
304 



259 
259 
259 
270 
270 
282 
282 
293 
293 
304 
304 
304 
304 
315 
315 
327 
327 
338 
338 
338 
338 
349 
349 
360 
360 
372 
372 



Applicable for single line haul to all common carriers of the State except where 
other specific rates are approved by the Commission. 

By order of the Commission: * . R. O. Self, 

July 1, 1922. Clerk. 

Circular No. 23L 
Cancels Circular No. 217. 



FREIGHT RATES 



147 



I 



RATES ON BRICK, COMMON, PRESSED OR PAVING, CL 50,000 POUNDS 
MINIMUM IN CENTS PER 100 POUNDS. 



Distance 


Carload 
Rate 


Distance 


Carload 
Rate 




3H 

W% 

4M 

4H 

4K 

5 

5 

5 

5 

53/2 

5M 

6 
6 
6 
6 

6M 




Wi 


12 " 


' over 7 


100 ' 
120 ' 
130 * 
140 ' 
160 ' 
180 ' 
200 ' 
220 ' 
240 ' 
260 ' 
280 ' 
300 ' 
320 ' 
340 ' 
360 ' 
380 ' 
400 ' 


97 


m 


17 " 




12 


100 


22 ' 


17 


" 120 




27 " 


22- ... 


" 130 




32 " 


27 


140 




37 " 


' 32 

' 37 


" 160 


IVi 


42 " 


" 180 

" 200 


8 


47 " 


42 


W2 


52 " 


' 47 


" 220 

" 240 


9 


57 " 


52 


10 


62 " 


57 


" 260 


67 " 


62 


" 280 


72 " 


' 67... 


" 300 


103^ 

11 


77 " 


72 


" 320 


82 " 


77 


" " 340 

" 360 


IIM 
113^ 

12 


87 " 


82 


92 " ' 


' 87 


" " 380 



Applicable for single line haul to all common carriers by rail of the Sta+e, except 
where other specific rates are approved by the Commission. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

July 1, 1922. Clerk. 

Circular No. 233. 
Cancels Circular No. 222. 



148 



N. C. COKPORATION COMMISSION 



RATES ON MARBLE, GRANITE AND STONE (CRUSHED OR RUBBLE), 
STONE SCREENINGS, GRAVEL (WASHED) AND SAND IN STRAIGHT 
OR MIXED CARLOADS, CARLOAD MINIMUM 60,000 POUNDS, EX- 
CEPT ACTUAL WEIGHT WILL APPLY WHERE CAR IS LOADED TO 
FULL VISIBLE CAPACITY, PER TON OF 2,000 POUNDS. 



Distance 



Rate 


Rate 




Single 


Joint 


Dista 


Line 


Haul 




50 


70 


160 miles and ove 


57 


77 


170 " 


60 


80 


180 " " " 


63 


83 


190 " 


66 


86 


200 " " " 


70 


90 


210 " 


73 


93 


220 " " " 


76 


96 


230 " 


80 


100 


240 " " " 


83 


103 


250 " 


86 


106 


260 " " " 


89 


109 


270 " 


93 


113 


280 " " " 


96 


116 


290 " 


99 


119 


300 " " " 


102 


122 


310 " 


105 


125 


320 " 


109 


129 


330 ' 


112 


132 


340 " 


115 


135 


350 ' 


118 


135 


360 " 


121 


136 


370 " 


124 


139 


380 " 


127 


142 


390 " 


130 


145 


400 " 



Rate 
Single 
Line 



Rate 
Joint 
Haul 



5 mi 

10 

15 

20 

25 

30 

35 

40 

45 

50 

55 

60 

65 

70 

75 

80 

85 

90 

95 
100 
110 
120 
130 
140 
150 



les and under 

over 5. 
10. 
15. 
20 _ 
25- 
30- 
35. 
40- 
45- 
50- 
55- 
60. 
65. 
70. 
75. 
80. 
85. 
90- 
95- 

100. 

110. 

120. 

130. 

140. 



160- 
170- 
180- 
190- 
200- 
210- 
220. 
230. 
240. 
250. 
260- 
270. 
280- 
290. 
300. 
310. 
320. 
330. 
340- 
350- 
360- 
370- 
380. 
390. 



132 
134 
136 
138 
140 
142 
144 
146 
148 
150 
152 
154 
156 
158 
160 
162 
164 
166 
168 
170 
172 
174 
176 
178 
180 



147 
149 
151 
153 
155 
155 
155 
156 
158 
160 
162 
164 
166 
168 
170 
172 
174 
176 
178 
180 
182 
184 
186 
188 
190 



These rates apply between all points in North Carolina on the lines of the Atlantic 
Coast Line, Southern Railway, Seaboard Air Line, Norfolk Southern Railroad, Nor- 
folk and Western Railway, Carohna, Chnchfield and Ohio Railway, Carolina and 
Northwestern Railway, and Winston-Salem Southbound Railway, except where 
other specific rates are approved by the Commission. For basis for joint rates with 
short lines see our Circular No. 219. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

July 1, 1922. Clerk. 



Circular No. 234. 
Cancels Circular No. 224. 



(Reissue.) 



i 



FREIGHT RATES 



149 



COTTON, IN BALES, ANY QUANTITY, IN CENTS PER 100 POUNDS. 



Distance 



Rate 


Rate 


Single 


Joint 


Line 


Haul 


18 


19H 


203^ 


22 


23V2 


25 


26 


2734 


29 


303/2 


30 


313^ 


31J^ 


33 


321^ 


34 


34 


35^ 


35 


3634 


36H 


38 


373^ 


39 


39 


4034 


40 


413^ 


41 H 


43 


42>^ 


44 


44 


4534 


45 


463^ 


461^ 


48 


47H 


49 


49H 


51 


51H 


53 


53 


543/2 


55 


56H 


56 


573^ 



Distance 



Rate 


Rate 


Single 


Joint 


Line 


Haul 


5634 


58 


5734 


59 


5834 


60 


5934 


61 


6034 


62 


61 


623^ 


62 


6334 


63 


6434 


64 


653^ 


65 


663^ 


65 3-^ 


67 


673^^2 


69 


&7y2 


69 


69 


7034 


69 


70>4 


70 


7134 


70 


7134 


71 


72y2 


71 


723^ 


72 


7334 


72 


7334 


723^ 


74 


723^ 


74 


74 


7534 


75 


76^ 


763^ 


78 



5 mi 

10 

15 

20 

25 

30 

35 

40 

45 

50 

55 

60 

65 

70 

75 

80 

85 

90 

95 
100 
110 
120 
130 
140 
150 



les and under 

over 5. 
10. 
15. 
20. 
25 _ 
30_ 
35_ 
40- 
45- 
50- 
55- 
60- 



70- 
75- 
80. 
85. 
90. 
95- 
100- 
110- 
120- 
130- 
140. 



160 miles and over 150- 

170 

" 170- 

" 180- 

" ISO- 

" 200. 

" 210- 

" 220- 

" 230- 

" 240. 

" 250- 

" 260- 

" 270- 

" 280- 

" 290. 

" 300. 

" 310. 

" 320. 

" 330- 

" 340- 

" 350. 

" 360. 

" 370. 



190 
200 
210 
220 
230 
240 
250 
260 
270 
280 
290 
300 
310 
320 
330 
340 
350 
360 
370 
380 
420 
440 
500 



420- 
440- 



These rates apply between all points in North Carolina on the lines of the Atlantic 
Coast Line Railroad; Atlantic and Yadkin Railway; Carolina and Northwestern Rail- 
way; Carolina and Tennessee Southern Railway; Carolina, Clinchfield and Ohio Rail- 
way; High Point, Randleman, Asheboro and Southern Railroad; Norfolk and Western 
Railway; Norfolk Southern Railroad; Seaboard Air Line Railway; Southern 
Railway; Winston-Salem Southbound Railway; Yadkin Railroad, except where 
other specific rates are approved by the Commission. For basis for joint rates with 
short lines see our Circular No. 219. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

July 1, 1922. Clerk. 



Circular No. 235. 
Cancels Circular No. 



226. (Reissue.) 



150 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

CAR DEMURRAGE RULES AND CHARGES 

Applying on Intrastate Traffic at all Points in North Carolina 
Issued December 15, 1922. Effective January 1, 1923. 



Application 

The Car Demurrage Rules and Charges, published herein apply on Intrastate 
traffic at all points on the railroads in North Carolina. 

Rule 1. — Cars Subject to Rules 

No TE. — The disposition at point of detention determines the purpose for which a car is held and the 
rule applicable thereto, except where there is specific tariff provision to the contrary. 

Section A . — Cars of either railroad or private ownership, held for or by consignors 
or consignees for loading, unloading, forwarding directions or for any other purpose 
(including cars held for loading company material unless the loading is done by the 
railroad for which the material is intended and on its tracks) are subject to these 
demurrage rules, except as provided in Section B. 

Section B. — The following cars are not subject to these demurrage rules: 

1. Cars under load with company material for use of and consigned to the rail- 
road in whose possession the cars are held. 

2. Cars under load with livestock. This exemption does not include cars held 
for or by shippers for loading livestock. Live poultry will not be considered as live- 
stock. 

3. Empty cars placed for loading coal at coal mines, coal mine sidings, coal wash- 
ers, or coke at coke ovens, and such cars under load with coal at such mines, mine 
sidings or coal washers, or with coke at coke ovens. This exemption applies only at 
mines, coal washers and ovens which are subject to car distribution rules in lieu of 
demurrage rules. 

4. (a) Private cars on private tracks when the ownership of the car and track is 
the same. 

Note. — Private cars while held under constructive placement for delivery upon the tracks of their 
owners are subject to demurrage charges after expiration of forty-eight hours' free time.( See Rules 
5 and 9.) 

Definitions 

Private Car. — A car having other than railroad ownership. A lease of a car is 
equivalent to ownership. Private cars must have the full name of the owner or 
lessee painted or stenciled thereon or must be boarded with full name of owner or 
lessee. If name of lessee is painted, stenciled or boarded on car, then the car is 
exempt from demurrage for the lessee only. If name of lessee is not painted, stenciled 
or boarded on car, then the car is exempt from demurrage for the owner only. 

Private Track. — A track outside of carrier's right of way, yard, and terminals, 
and of which the carrier does not own either the rails, ties, roadbed, or right of way; 
or a track or a portion of a track which is devoted to the purposes of its user either by 
lease or written agreement. 

4. (b) Empty private cars stored on railroad or private tracks, including such 
cars sent by the owner to a shipper for loading, provided the cars have not been placed 
or tendered for loading on the orders of a shipper. (See Rule 6, Section D.) 

Rule 2 — Free Time Allowed 

Section ji. — Forty-eight hours (two days) free time will be allowed for loading or 
unloading all commodities (see Exception). (See Rule 2, Section B, Paragraph, 4.) 
"Loading" includes the furnishing of forwarding directions on outbound cars. 
"Unloading" includes: 

(a) Surrender of bill of lading on shipments billed "to order," 

(b) Payment of lawful freight charges when required prior to delivery of the car. 

(c) Furnishing of a "turn-over" order (an order for delivery to another party) 
after car has been placed for delivery and no additional movement of the car is made. 

When the same car is both unloaded and reloaded, each transaction will be treated 
as independent of the other. This will also apply to industries performing their 



FREIGHT RATES 151 

own switching service, in which case the industry must notify the carrier date and 
time car was unloaded. 

When a car held for loading or unloading is moved by railroad or private power to 
another point in the same yard or industry to complete loading or unloading, only 
forty-eight hours free time will be allowed, except that when the railroad makes a 
charge for such movement the time incident thereto shall not be computed against 
the car. 

(See Rule 7, Note 2.) . 

Note. — If a consignee wishes his car held at any break-up yard or a hold yard before notification 
and placement, such oar will be subject to demurrage. That is to say, the time held in the break-up 
yard will be included within the 48 hours of free time. If he wishes to exempt his car from the imposition 
of demurrage he must either, by general orders given to the carrier or by specific orders as to incoming 
freight, notify the carrier of the track upon which he wishes his freight placed, in which event he 
will have the full 48 hours free time from the time when the placement is n^ade upon the track 
designated. This "Note" will apply except when in conflict with Rule 2, Section B, Paragraph 1. 

Section B. — Twenty-four hours (one day) free time will be allowed: 
1. When cars are held for reconsignment, diversion or reshipment, or held in transit 
on order of consignor, consignee or owner. 

Note — This will not apply to cars subject to Rule 2, Section B, Paragraph 3. 

The term "diversion" or "reconsignment" will be applied as defined in the recon- 
signment tariffs of the carriers, except that under this rule when a car is placed for 
delivery at destination a "turn-over" (or order for delivery to another party) which 
does not involve an additional movement of the car is not a reconsignment. (See 
Rule 2, Section A.) 

A reshipment is the making of a new contract by which under a new rate the 
original lading, without being unloaded, is forwarded in the same car to another 
destination. 

2. When cars, destined for delivery to or for forwarding by a connecting line, are 
held under tariff regulations for surrender of bill of lading or payment of lawful 
freight charges. 

3. When cars are held in transit and placed for inspection or grading, including 
reconsignment or other disposition orders. At stations where grain and hay must 
be inspected or graded, the consignee agreeing with the carrier in writing for file at 
the station, to accept the bulletining of the cars as due and adequate notice of arrival, 
the bulletins must be posted by 9:00 A.M. of each day, showing the previous twenty- 
four (24) hours' receipts, and the free time (twenty-four hours) is to be calculated 
from the first 7:00 A.M. thereafter. Where there is no agreement for bulletining of 
cars, the free time must be calculated from the first 7:00 A.M. after the day on which 
notice of arrival is sent or given to the consignee. 

4. Except as otherwise provided in Rule 2, Section A, when cars are held to com- 
plete loading, or to partly unload. 

Note.— When a car held for unloading is partly unloaded and partly reloaded, 48 hours free time 
will be allowed for the entire transaction. 

Rule 3 — Computing Time 

Note. — In computing time, Sundays and legal holidays (National, State, and Municipal), but not 
half-holidays, will be excluded, except as otherwise provided in Section A of Rule 9. When a legal 
holiday falls on Sunday the following Monday will be excluded. 

Section A. — On cars held for loading, time will be computed from the first 7:00 
A.M. after placement on pubhc delivery tracks and without notice of placement, but 
if not placed within 24 hours after 7:00 A.M. of the day for which ordered, time will 
be computed from 7:00 A.M. after the day on which notice of placement is sent or 
given to consignor. (See Rule 6 — Cars for Loading.) ' 

Section B. — 1. On cars held for orders surrender of bill of lading or payment of 
freight charges, whether such cars have been placed in position to unload or not, time 
will be computed from the first 7:00 A.M. after the day on which notice of arrival is 
sent or given to the consignee or party entitled to receive same. (See Rule 4 — 
Notification.) 

Note. — The time between receipt of order and placement of car (not to include the time attributa- 
ble to the act or neglect of consignor or consignee) will be deducted from the total detention of the 



152 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

2. Orders for disposition or reconsignment, when mailed, wired or otherwise 
transmitted by the reconsignor to agent of the carrier at point where cars are held, or 
to the agent of any carrier named in the bill of lading contract or participating in the 
transportation transaction, unless otherwise provided by tariff, will release cars at 
7:00 A.M. of the date such orders are received by any such agent, provided they are 
sent or given prior to the date received. 

Such orders mailed, wired or otherwise transmitted and received the same date, 
will release cars at the hour the orders are received by any such agent. 

Date of mailing to be determined by the postmark. 

Note. — When order releasing a car is sent to the railroad by U. S. mail and the order is not received 
by the addressee, the car shall be considered released as of the date the order should have been delivered , 
provided proof is furnished by the claimant that the order was deposited in the U. S. mail properly 
stamped and addressed on the date claimed. 

Section C. — 1. On cars held for unloading, except as otherwise provided in Sec- 
tion B, Paragraph 1, of this Rule, time will be computed from the first 7:00 A.M., 
after placement on public delivery tracks, and after the day on which notice of arrival 
is sent or given to consignee or party entitled to receive same. If car is not placed 
within 24 hours after notice of arrival has been sent or given, time will be computed from 
the first 7:00 A.M. after the day on which notice of placement has been sent or given 
to the consignee or party entitled to receive same. (See Rule 4, Sections A and D. ) 

2. On cars subject to Rule 5, Section B, Paragraph 2, time will be computed from 
the first 7:00 A.M. after the day on which notice as required by Rule 5, Section B, 
Paragraph 1, is sent or given to the consignee or party entitled to receive same. 

Section D. — On cars to be delivered on other than public delivery tracks, time 
will be computed from the first 7:00 A.M. after actual or constructive placement on 
such tracks. Time computed from actual placement on cars placed at exactly 7:00 
A.M. will begin at the same 7:00 A.M.; actual placement to be determined by the 
precise time the engine cuts loose. (See Rule 4, Section C, and Rules 5 and 6.) 

Note 1. — "Actual Placement" is made when a car is placed in an accessible position for loading or 
unloading or at a point previously designated by the consignor or consignee. If such placing is pre- 
vented from any cause attributable to consignor or consignee and car is placed on the private or other- 
than-public-delivery track serving the consignor or consignee, it shall be considered constructively 
placed, without notice. 

Note 2. — Any railroad track or portion thereof assigned for individual use will be treated as "other- 
than-public-delivery track." 

Section E. — On cars to be delivered on interchange tracks of industrial plants 
performing the switching service for themselves or other parties, time will be com- 
puted from the first 7:00 A.M. after actual or constructive placement on such inter- 
change tracks until return to the same or another interchange track. Time computed 
from the actual placement on cars placed at exactly 7:00 A.M. will begin at the same 
7:00 A.M.; actual placement to be determined by the precise time the engine cuts 
loose. (See Rule 4, Section C, and Rules 5 and 6.) Cars returned loaded will not 
be recorded released until necessary billing instructions are furnished. 

Note. — Where two or more parties take delivery from the same interchange track, or where the rail- 
road company uses the interchange track for other cars, or where the interchange track is not adjacent 
to the plant and the industry uses the railroad's tracks to reach same, a notice of placement shall be 
sent or given to the consignee and time will be computed from the first 7:00 A.M. thereafter. 

Rule 4 — Notification 

Section A. — Notice of arrival shall be sent or given consignee or party entitled to 
receive same by the railroad's agent in writing or, in lieu thereof, as otherwise agreed 
to in writing by the railroad and consignee, within twenty-four hours after arrival of 
car and billing at destination, such notice to contain car initials and number, point of 
skipment, contents and, if transferred in transit, the initial and number of orginal 
car. When address of consignee does not appear on billing, and is not known, the 
notice of arrival must be deposited in United States mail enclosed in a stamped envel- 
ope bearing return address, same to be preserved on file if returned. An imi:»ression 
copy shall be retained, and when notice is sent or given on a postal card the impres- 
sion shall be of both sides. (See Rule 3, Sections B and C.) In case a car subject to 
Rule 3, Section C, is not placed on public delivery track within twenty-four hours 
after notice of arrival has been sent or given, notice of placement shall be sent or 
given to consignee. 

Note. — When owner requests that original point of shipment be omitted on reconsigned cars, this 
information shall not be shown on notice of arrival at destination. 



FREIGHT RATES 153 

Section B. — When cars are ordered stopped in transit, notice shall be sent or given 
the party ordering the cars stopped upon arrival of cars at point of stoppage. 

Section C. — Delivery of cars upon other than public delivery tracks or upon in- 
dustrial interchange tracks, or written notice sent or given to consignee or party 
entitled to receive same, of readiness to so deliver, will constitute notification to 
consignee. (See Rule 8, Section D, Paragraph 1 (b).) 

Section D. — In all cases where any part of the contents of a car has been removed 
by the consignee prior to the sending or giving of required notice, such removal shall 
be considered as notice of arrival. 

Section E. — 1. When carload freight is refused at destination, notice of such refusal 
shall, within 24 hours thereafter, be sent by wire to consignor, when known, at his 
expense, or when not known, to agent at point of shipment, who shall be required 
promptly to notify the shipper if known. 

2. (a) When unclaimed perishable carload freight has not been disposed of within 
two days from the first 7:00 A.M. after the day on which notice of arrival has been 
sent or given to consignee, notice to that effect shall be sent by wire as provided in 
Paragraph 1 of this section. 

(b) When other carload freight is unclaimed within five days from the first 7:00 
A.M. after the day on which notice of arrival has been sent or given to the consignee, 
a notice to that effect shall be sent by wire as provided in Paragraph 1 of this section. 
(See Rule 8, Section D, Paragraph 4.) 

Rule 5 — Placing Cars for Unloading 

Note. — Under this rule the time of movement between hold point and destination, and any other 
time for which the railroad is responsible, will not be computed against the consignee. 

Section A. — 1. When delivery of a car consigned or ordered to an industrial inter- 
change track or to other than a public delivery track cannot be made on account of 
the inability of the consignee to receive it, or because of any other condition attrib- 
utable to the consignee, such car will be held at destination or, if it cannot reasonably 
be accommodated there, at the nearest available hold point, and written notice that 
the car is held and that the railroad is unable to deliver will be sent or given to the 
consignee. This will be considered constructive placement. (See Rule 3, Sections 
D and E.) 

2. On a car to be delivered to a switching line for final delivery and which con- 
signee located on switching line is unable to receive and which for that reason the 
switching line is unable to receive from the railroad, notice will be sent or given the' 
switching line showing point of shipment, car initials and numbers, contents and 
consignee and if transferred in transit the initials and number of the o'riginal car. 

3. When the railroad is the switching line and, under conditions set forth in 
Paragraph 1, is unable to receive cars from a connecting line at destination for deliv- 
ery within switching limits, upon receipt of notice from connecting line it will notify 
the consignee and put such cars under constructive placement. (See Rule 4, Sec- 
tion C.) 

Section B. — 1. When delivery cannot be made on specifically designated public 
delivery tracks, on account of such tracks being fully occupied, or from other causes 
beyond the control of the railroad, notice shall be sent or given the consignee in writ- 
ing or, in lieu thereof, as otherwise agreed to in writing, that delivery will be made 
at the nearest available point to the consignee, naming the point. Such delivery 
shall be made unless the consignee shall before delivery indicate a preferred available 
point, in which case the preferred delivery will be made. 

2. In the event consignee or party entitled to receive shipment serves notice upon 
the railroad of refusal to accept dehvery at the point named in notice sent or given in 
accordance with Paragraph 1, the car will be held awaiting opportunity to deliver on 
the specially designated track subject to Rule 3, Section C, Paragraph 2. 

Rule 6 — Cars for Loading 

Section A. — Cars for loading will be considered placed when such cars are actually 
placed or held on orders of the consignor. In the latter case the agent must send or 
give the consignor written notice of all cars which he has been unable to place 
because of condition of the other-than-public-delivery track or because of other 
conditions attributable to the consignor. This will be considered constructive place- 
ment. (See Rule 3, Sections D and E.) 



154 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

Section B. — When empty cars placed on orders are not used in transportation 
service, demurrage will be charged from the first 7:00 A.M. after actual or construc- 
tive placement until released, with no free time allowance. 

Section C. — 1. Cars received from a switching line and held by the railroad for for- 
warding directions are subject to demurrage charges from the first 7:00 A.M. after 
they are received, until proper forwarding directions are furnished, with no free time 
allowance and without notice, except that cars received between 4:00 P.M. and 7:00 
A.M. will not be subject to demurrage if forwarding directions are received prior to 
the following 12:00 noon. 

2. Private cars which have been loaded on the tracks of their owners, received 
from such tracks and held by the railroad for forwarding directions, are subject to 
demurrage charges from the first 7:00 A.M. after they are received until proper for- 
warding directions are furnished, with no free time allowance and without notice. 

Section D. — If an empty car is appropriated without being ordered, it shall be 
considered as having been ordered and actually placed at the time so appropriated. 
If not loaded outbound, such car is subject to Section B of this rule. 

Rule 7 — Demurrage Charges 

Section A. — On cars not subject to Rule 9 (Average Agreement): After the ex- 
piration of free time allowed, the following charges per car per day, or fraction of a 
day, will be made until car is released: 

For each of the first four days, $2.00. 

For each succeeding day, $5.00. 

Section B. — The charges on cars subject to average agreement are set forth in 
Rule 9. 

Note 1. — When through no fault of the consignor or consignee the lading of a car is transferred by 
a carrier into two or more cars, or when two small cars are furnished by a carrier in lieu of one large 
car ordered by the shipper, demurrage will be charged as for one car only, as long as any of such cars 
are detained beyond the free time. 

Note 2. — When a car contains two or more minimum carload shipments consigned to more than 
one consignee at the same station, demurrage will be charged the same as if the shipments had been 
received in separate cars and each consignee will be allowed a total free time of 48 hours (2 days) for 
unloading, free of interference by the other consignee or consignees. 

(See North Carolina Storage Rules and Charges for additional charges on cars 
loaded with inflammable freight and less dangerous or relatively safe explosives.) 

Rule 8 — Claims 

No demurrage charges shall be collected under these rules for detention of cars 
through causes named below. Demurrage charges assessed or collected under such 
conditions shall be promptly cancelled or refunded by the railroad. 

Causes 
Section A. — Weather Interference. 

Note.— A consignor or consignee shall not be absolved from demurrage under Section A of this 
rule if. considering the character of the freight, others similarly situated and under the same con- 
ditions reasonably could and did load or unload cars during the same period of time. 

1 . When the condition of the weather during any part of the prescribed free time 
(or the adjusted free time provided for in Section B of this rule) is such as to make 
it impossible for men or teams to work at loading or unloading, or impossible to place 
freight in cars, or move it from cars, without serious injury to the freight, or when, 
because of high water or snowdrifts (see Note) it is impossible, during the prescribed 
free time, to get to the cars for loading or unloading, the free time will be extended 
until a total of forty-eight hours (or twenty-four hours on cars subject to Rule 2, 
Section B, Paragraph 4) free from such interference shall have been allowed. No 
additional time will be allowed unless claim, stating fully the conditions which pre- 
vented loading or unloading within the free time, is presented in writing to the rail- 
road's agent within thirty days after the date on which demurrage bill is rendered. 

Note. — The extension of free time on account of high water or snowdrifts shall apply to other- 
than-public-delivery tracks only where there is a disability of the railroad. 

2. When, at time of actual placement, lading is frozen so as to require heating, 
thawing or loosening to unload, the free time allowed shall be extended forty-eight 
( 48) hours, making a total of ninety-six (96) hours free time, provided the consignee 



FKEIGHT RATES 155 

shall, within forty-eight (48) hours after actual placement, serve upon the railroad's 
agent a written statement that the lading was in such frozen condition at time of 
actual placement. 

3. No allowance on account of weather interference shall be made on cars subject 
to Rule 6, Section B. 

Section B. — Bunching. 

1. Cars for loading. When, by reason of delay or irregularity in filling orders, 
cars are bunched and placed for loading in accumulated numbers in excess of daily 
placing as ordered, the shipper shall be allowed such free time for loading as he would 
have been entitled to had the cars been placed for loading as ordered. 

2. Cars for unloading or reconsigning. When, as the result of the act or neglect 
of any carrier, cars originating at the same point, moving via the same route and con- 
signed to one consignee at one point, are bunched, or when cars originating at differ- 
ent points and transported via the same route from an intermediate common point 
to destination are bunched after arriving at the common point (in which event the 
dates of arrival of the cars at common point will govern in determining the bunching 
instead of the dates of shipment), and are tendered for delivery by this railroad in 
accumulated numbers in excess of daily shipments, the consignee shall be allowed 
such free time as he would have been entitled to had the cars not been bunched, but 
when any car is released before the expiration of such free time, the free time on the 
next car will be computed from the first 7:00 A.M. following such release; provided, 
however, no allowance will be made unless claim is presented in writing to the rail- 
road's agent within thirty days after the date on which bill for demurrage is rendered, 
supported by the receipted bill as evidence of payment of the demurrage as orginally 
charged and a statement showing date and point of shipment of each car involve i in 
the bunching claim. 

Note. — Under this rule, cars moving from different points and (or) via different routes to destina- 
tion and arriving on different dates will be considered bunched if tendered for deUvery on one day and 
such free time shall be allowed as the consignee would have been entitled to had the cars been 
placed or tendered for delivery in the order of their arrival. 

Section C. — Demand of overcharge. When the railroad's agent demands the pay- 
ment of transportation charges in excess of tariff authority. 
Section D. — Delayed or improper notice by the railroad. 

1. (a) When notice of arrival does not contain all the information specified in 
Rule 4, Section A, consignee shall not have the right to call in question the sufficiency 
of such notice, unless within the prescribed free time he shall serve upon the railroad's 
agent a written statement of the omitted information required, in which event the 
time between receipt of such statement and the furnishing of the omitted information 
will not be computed against the consignee. 

(b) When the consignee makes request in writing for the name of the consignor, 
point of shipment and (or), if transferred in transit, the initials and number of the 
original car, to enable him to identify the shipment in a car placed or tendered for 
delivery on other than public delivery track, such information will be furnished, but 
consignee shall not be entitled to additional free time unless such request has been 
served on the railroad's agent within the prescribed free time, in which event the 
time between receipt of the request and compliance therewith will not be computed 
against the consignee. (See Rule 4, Section A, Note.) 

2. When claim is made that a mailed notice has been delayed^ postmark thereon 
shall be accepted as indicating the date of the notice. 

3. When a notice is mailed by the railroad on Sunday, a legal holiday, or after 
3:00 P.M. on other days (as evidenced by the postmark thereon), consignee shall be 
allowed five hours additional free time provided he shall send or give to the railroad's 
agent, within the first twenty-four hours of free time, written advice that the notice 
had not been received until after the free time had begun to run; in case of failure on 
the part of the consignee so to advise the railroad's agent, no additional free time 
shall be allowed. 

4. In case of failure by the railroad to send notice in accordance with the provisions 
of Rule 4, Section E, the consignor shall not be held liable for demurrage charges be- 
tween the date of the notice should have been sent and the date it was actually sent. 

Section E. — Error of any railroad which prevents proper tender of delivery. 
1. Under this rule demurrage will be charged on the basis of the amount that 
would have accrued but for such error. This also applies in the case of constructively 



156 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

placed cars being ''run around" by actually placing recent arrivals ahead of previous 
arrivals, but allowance will only be made on cars subject to Rule 9, Average 
Agreement, that are held beyond the fourth debit day. 

Rule 9 — Average Agreement 

When the following agreement has been entered into, the charge for detention of 
cars, on all cars subject to demurrage, held for loading or unloading, shall be com- 
puted on the basis of the average time of detention to all such cars released during 
each calendar month; such average detention and charge to be computed as 
follows : 

Section A. — One credit will be allowed for each car, released within the first twenty- 
four (24) hours of free time. After the expiration of forty-eight (48) hours (96 hours 
on cars subject to Rule 8, Section A, Paragraph 2) free time, one debit per car per 
day, or fraction of a day, will be charged for each of the first four days. In no case 
shall more than one credit be allowed on any one car, and in no case shall more than 
four credits be applied in cancellation of debits accruing on any one car. When a 
car has accrued four debits a charge of $5.00 per car per day, or fraction of a day, will 
be made for all subsequent detention and will apply on all subsequent Sundays and 
legal holidays, including a Sunday or holiday immediately following the day on which 
the fourth debit begins to run. 

Section B. — Credits earned on cars held for loading shall not be used in offsetting 
debits accruing on cars held for unloading, nor shall credits earned on cars held for 
unloading be used in offsetting debits accruing on cars held for loading. 

Section C. — Credits cannot be earned by private cars subject to Rule 1, Section B, 
Paragraph 4 (a), but debits charged on such private cars while under constructive 
placement may be offset by credits earned on other cars. 

Section D. — At the end of the calendar month, the total number of credits will be 
deducted from the total number of debits and $2.00 per debit will be charged for the 
remainder. If the credits equal or exceed the debits no charge will be made for the 
detention of the cars, and no payment will be made by the railroad on account of 
such excess of credits; nor shall the credits in excess of the debits of any one month 
be considered in computing the average detention for another month. 

Section E. — A party who enters into this average agreement shall not be entitled 
to include therein cars subject to Rule 2, Section B, nor shall he be entitled to can- 
cellation or refund of demurrage charges under Section A, Paragraph 1, nor under 
Section B of Rule 8, except where bunching has been caused by strike of carrier's 
employees, or where shipments of coal, withheld by the carrier to protect its fuel 
supply, are subsequently delivered to consignee in accumulated numbers. 

Section F. — A party who enters into this average agreement may be required to 
give sufficient security to the railroad for the payment of balances against him at the 
end of each month. 

Section G. — An average agreement must include all cars loaded or unloaded within 
the jurisdiction of the same station, except that when desired separate agreements 
may be entered into for each plant or yard within the jurisdiction of the same station, 
but in no case can the cars loaded or unloaded within the jurisdiction of two or more 
stations be combined in one average agreement, nor shall the cars loaded or unloaded 
by more than one consignor or consignee be combined in one average agreement, 
except that cars consigned, reconsigned, or ordered to a public elevator, warehouse 
or cotton compress serving various parties may be combined in one average agree- 
ment. 

Agreement 

Railroad. 

Being fully acquainted with the terms, conditions, and effect of the average basis 

for settling for detention to cars as set forth in being the car demurrage 

rules governing at all stations and sidings on the lines of said railroad, except as 
shown in said tariff, and being desirous of availing (myself or ourselves) of this 

alternate method of settlement (I or we) do expressly agree to and with the_ 

Railroad that with respect to all cars which may, during the continuance of this agree- 
ment, be handled for (my or our) account at (Station"), (I or we) will 

fully observe and comply with all the terms and conditions of said rules as they are 
now published or may hereafter be lawfully modified by duly published tariffs, 
and will make prompt payment of all demurrage charges accruing thereunder in ac- 



FREIGHT KATES 157 

cordance with the average basis as therein estabhshed or as hereafter lawfully 
modified by duly pubhshed tariffs. 

This agreement to be effective on and after the day of , 19 

and to continue until termination by written notice from either party to the other, 
which notice shall become effective on the first day of the month succeeding that in 
which it is given. 

Approved and accepted 19 , by and on behalf of the above- 
named railroad by 

Circular No. 236. 
(Cancels Circular No. 227.) 



STORAGE RULES AND CHARGES 

Applicable to Freight Held or Stored in or on Railroad Premises 
OF Railroads in North Carolina 



Rule 1 — Freight Subject to Rules 

Freight including equipment moving on its own wheels, as freight at tariff rate, as 
described in Rule 5, Section D, received for delivery or held to complete a shipment 
or for forwarding directions, if stored or held in or on the premises or tracks of the 
railroad, is subject to these storage rules, except as provided in Section D of this rule. 

Shipments of less-than-carload freight, loaded into or delivered direct from cars, 
are subject to storage rules, but when the loading or unloading is done by shipper 
or consignee, either as required by classifications or tariffs, or at request of shipper 
or consignee, the cars are subject to demurrage rules and storage rules do not apply. 

Note. — Freight which is not liable to damage from the elements and which is not ordinarily handled 
through freight houses may be stored free, unless otherwise provided, on the vacant land of the rail- 
road, pending shipment, and entirely at owner's risk, provided owner has previously been assigned 
space as far as available and without distinction. 

Section A. — Freight upon which the free time allowed under demurrage rules has 
expired while in cars, and subsequently unloaded in or on railroad premises, is sub- 
ject to these storage rules when unloaded, without free time allowance. 

Section B. — Carload shipments of explosives, or other dangerous articles, are sub- 
ject to both demurrage and storage rules. (See Rule 6.) 

Section C. — Carload freight, other than explosives or other dangerous articles, 
held in cars for delivery and subsequently unloaded in or on railroad premises, is 
subject to demurrage rules while in cars and to these storage rules after it is unloaded. 

If unloaded or reloaded by the carrier, the actual cost of the service will be in addi- 
tion to the storage charge. (See Rule 5, Section C.) 

Section D. — Exception. — The rules and charges herein will not apply on: 

1. Freight stored in warehouses owned and operated by railroads as exclusively 
storage warehouses. 

2. Export or import freight at the port of export or import. 

3. Domestic freight received from or intended for delivery to ocean or lake vessels 
at the port of transhipment. 

4. Freight subject to lighterage at seaboard points. * 

5. Carload lots of Coal, Coke or Ore. 

Rule 2 — Notification 

Section A. — Notice shall be sent or given consignee or party entitled to receive 
same by carrier's agent in writing, or as otherwise agreed to in writing by carrier 
and consignee, within twenty-four hours (one day) after arrival of shipment and 
billing at destination, such notice to specify point of shipment and commodity. 

An impression copy of written notice shall be retained. When notice is sent or 
given on a postal card, the impression shall be of both sides. 

When the address of the consignee does not appear on billing and is not known, 
notice of arrival must be deposited in the United States mail enclosed in a stamped 
envelope bearing return address, same to be preserved on file if returned. 



158 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

Refused or Unclaimed Freight 

Sectio7i B. — 1. Where shipments have been plainly marked with the consignor's 
name and address, preceded by the word ''from," notice shall be immediately sent 
or given consignor of refusal of less-than-carload shipments. Unclaimed less-than- 
carload shipments will be treated as refused after fifteen calendar days from ex- 
piration of free time. 

2. Notice shall be sent or given the consignor of unclaimed or refused shipments 
of explosives or other dangerous articles on hand forty-eight hours, provided written 
request is received for this information by agent at point of origin at time of ship- 
ment. Such requests should be plainly written on a rectangular piece of paper of 
different color from any label required under the Interstate Commerce Commission's 
regulations and placed on the package in close proximity to such label (or to name 
of consignee). 

3. Where consignor requests that notice of unclaimed or refused shipments be 
sent by telegraph, this may only be done at his expense. 

Rule 3 — Free Time Allowed 

Section A. — 1. Forty-eight hours' (two days) free time will be allowed on all com- 
modities except the more dangerous explosives, as described in Rule 6, Section A, 
for the removal of inbound freight from car or railroad premises, or to complete a 
carload shipment and furnish forwarding directions therefor. 

Exceptions. On less-than-carload shipments consigned to parties located at in- 
terior or at non-railroad points, the following allowance of free time will be made 
when hauled: 

10 miles and not over 20 miles from the station, 5 days. 

Over 20 miles and not over 30 miles from the station, 10 days. 

Over 30 miles from the station, 15 days. 

2. Outbound less-than-carload freight not acco npanied bj^ proper shipping di- 
rections which will permit forwarding on date received, will be subject to storage 
charges from the first 7:00 A.M. after receipt (of the shipment with no free time al- 
lowance. 

Section B. — Twenty-four hours' (one day) free time will be allowed. 

1. On less-than-carload freight held to complete a shipment. 

2. On less-than-carload freight held for reshipment. 

3. On the more dangerous explosives (as described in Rule 6, Section A), for re- 
moval of inbound freight from car or railroad premises or to complete a carload ship- 
ment outbound and furnish forwarding directions therefor. 

Note. — Outbound less-than-carload shipments of the more dangerous explosives not accompanied 
by proper shipping directions which will permit forwarding on the date received, will not be accepted. 

4. On carload shipments of explosives and other dangerous articles, as described 
in Rule 6, reconsigned or reshipped in the same car received, or when such shipments, 
destined for delivery to or forwarding by a connecting line, are held under tariff 
regulations for surrender of bill of lading or payment of lawful freight charges. 

Rule 4 — Computing Time 

Section A. — In computing time any fractional part of 100 pounds will be computed 
as 100 pounds and any fractional part of twentj^-four hours will be computed as 
one day. 

Section B. — In computing time, Sundays and legal holidays (National, State and 
Municipal), but not half-holidays^ will be excluded. When a legal holiday falls on 
a Sunday, the following Monday will be excluded. 

Section C. — On inbound freight held for removal and on freight held for recon- 
signment or reshipment, time will be computed from the first 7:00 A.M. after the 
day on which notice of arrival is sent or given to consignee. 

Section D. — On outbound freight, time will be computed from the first 7:00 A.M. 
after receipt in or on railroad premises. 

Section E. — On outbound carloads of explosives and other dangerous articles (as 
described in Rule 6), time will be computed from the first 7:00 A.M. after loading 
is begun. 



FREIGHT KATES 159 

Section F. — When orders for freight held for disposition or reconsignment are 
mailed, such orders will release freight at 7:00 A.M. of the date orders are received 
at the station where the freight is held, provided the orders are mailed prior to the 
date received, but orders mailed and received on the same date release freight the 
following 7:00 A.M. 

Rule 5 — Charges for Storage on Freight Other Than Explosives 
AND Other Dangerous Articles 

Section A. — Freight, except Automobiles or other self-propelling vehicles (but not 
excepting Motorcycles or bicycle motor wheels), held in or on railroad premises in 
excess of free time allowed, will be subject to the following storage charges per day, 
or at option of carrier may be sent to public warehouses: 

For each of the first five days, Ij^ cents per 100 lbs.; 

For the sixth and each succeeding day, 3 cents per 100 lbs.; 

Minimum storage charge per shipment on freight held beyond free time, five (5) 
days or part thereof, 25 cents; six (6) days or more, 50 cents. 

Section B. — After expiration of free time, Automobiles or other self-propelling 
vehicles (except motorcycles and bicycle motor wheels) will be subject to a storage 
charge of three and one-half (33^) cents per 100 lbs. per day, with a minimum charge 
of $1.00 per machine per day for each of the first five (5) days, and S2.00 per machine 
for each succeeding day, or at option of carrier may be sent to public warehouses. 

Section C. — (a) When carload freight is unloaded by the carrier for the purpose of 
releasing needed equipment, the storage charge will be the same as would have ac- 
crued under car Demurrage and Track Storage Rules had the freight remained in 
the car. (See Rule 1, Section C.) 

(b) When carload freight is unloaded in or on railroad premises by or upon re- 
quest of consignee or consignor, the storage charges shall not exceed the amount 
that would have accrued under Demurrage and Track Storage Rules had the 
freight remained in the car. 

Section D. — After the expiration of 48 hours' free time, derrick cars, pile-driver 
cars, camp cars, road construction and asphalt outfits, and other equipment not 
adapted to or customarily used for revenue freight loading and which ordinarily 
are not and cannot be unloaded, moving on own wheels at freight tariff rates, will 
be subject to a storage charge of one dollar ($1.00) per car, or other unit of equipment, 
per day, while held on tracks of the railroad. 

Rule 6 — Charges for Storage on Explosives and Other Dangerous Articles 

Extracts from Regulations prescribed by the Interstate Commerce Commission 

1. Paragraph 1433 . . . "consignee must remove such shipments from the carrier's 
property within 48 hours after notice of arrival at destination, Sundays and holidays 
not included." 

2. Paragraph 1643 (a) . . . 'Tf a shipment of Explosives is not removed within 48 
hours after notice of arrival at destination, it must be disposed of by return to the 
shipper, or by storage at the expense of the owner, or by sale, or when necessary to 
safety by destruction under supervision of a competent person." 

3. Paragraph 1714 ''(a) . . . consignee must remove such shipments from the car- 
rier's property within 48 hours after notice of arrival at destination, Sundays and 
holidays not included." 

"(b) When removal of carload or less-carload shipments of dangerous articles 
other than explosives requiring TNFLAMMABLE' or 'ACID' placards, or red, 
yellow, green or white I. C. C. labels from carrier's premises has not been made with- 
in 48 hours after notice of arrival has been sent or given consignee (Sundays and 
holidays not included), shipments must be disposed of as follows: 

1. Carload shipments (a) by storage on carrier's property or (b) by storage on 
other than carrier's property if safe storage on carrier's premises is not available; 
or (c) by sale at expiration of thirty calendar days after notice of arrival has been 
sent or given consignee, provided consignor has been notified of non-delivery at 
expiration of 48-hour period and orders for disposition have not been received. 

2. Less-carload shipments (a) by return to shipper if notice of non-delivery was 
requested and given consignor as prescribed by carrier's tariff, and orders for return 
to shipper have been received, or (b) by storage on carrier's property, or (c) by 
storage on other than carrier's property, if safe storage on carrier's property is not 



160 N. C. CORPOKATION COMMISSION 

available, or (d) by sale at expiration of 30 calendar days after notice of arrival has 
been sent or given to consignee, provided consignor has been notified of non-delivery 
at expiration of 4S-hour period and orders for disposition have not been received." 

Storage will be charged at the following rates per day of twenty-four hours or 
fraction thereof, on Explosives or other dangerous articles, held in or on railroad 
premises, in excess of free time allowed. 

Section A. — On shipments of the more dangerous explosives, i. e.. Low Explosives, 
Black Powder, High Explosives, Wet Fulminate of Mercury, Blasting Caps, Electric 
Blasting Caps, Ammunition for Cannon with Explosive Projectiles, Explosive Pro- 
jectiles, Explosive Torpedoes, Explosive Mines, Explosive Bombs and Detonating 
Fuzes; on less than carload shipments of such articles twenty-eight and one-half 
(283^) cents per 100 lbs. per day, with a minimum charge of fifty (50) cents per ship- 
ment. 

On shipments of such articles (described in Section A of this rule) held in cars for 
or by consignors or consignees, for loading, unloading, forwarding directions, or for 
any other purpose charge will be five dollars ($5.00) per car per day, in addition to 
the regular demurrage and track storage charges. 

Section B. — On shipments of the less dangerous and relatively safe Explosives, 
i. e.. Ammunition for Cannon with Empty Projectiles, Ammunition for Cannon with 
Sand Loaded Projectiles, Ammunition for Cannon with Solid Projectiles, Am- 
munition for Cannon without Projectiles, Smokeless Powder for Cannon, Smoke- 
less Powder for Small Arms, Common Fireworks, Special Fireworks, Small Arms 
Ammunition, Cannon Primers, Small Arms Primers, Empty Cartridge Bags — Black 
Powder Igniters, Empty Cartridge Shells, Primed, Combination Primers, Per- 
cussion Caps, Time, Tracer or Percussion Fuzes, Combination Fuzes, Safety Fuse, 
Instantaneous Fuse, Cordeau Detonant and Safety Squibs, or less-than-carload ship- 
ments of Dangerous Articles other than Explosives requiring Red, Yellow, Green or 
White I. C. C. labels, on less than carload shipments of such articles, twelve (12) 
cents per 100 pounds per day, with a minimum charge of twenty-five (25) cents per 
shipment. 

On shipments of the less dangerous and relatively safe explosives, which, under 
the I. C. C. Regulations require "INFLAMMABLE" placards, or which do not re- 
quire placards, and on shipments of Dangerous Articles other than Explosives which 
under I. C. C. Regulations, require "INFLAMMABLE" or "ACID" placards, held 
in cars for or by consignors or consignees, for loading, unloading, forwarding directions 
or for any other purpose, charge will be two dollars ($2.00) per car per day in addition 
to the regular demurrage and track storage charges. 

Note. — The term "Railroad Premises," as used in this rule when applicable to carload shipments, 
shall embrace all tracks which the railroad provides for its own uses and purposes; and also private 
tracks constructed, maintained or operated under a written agreement by which the railroad re- 
serves the right to use the whole or any part of them for itself or others than the party with whom the 
agreement is executed. 

Section C. — When shipments of the "more dangerous explosives" (see Section A) 
are not removed from the railway premises by the consignee within the legal limit 
(forty-eight hours) (two days) after the first 7:00 A.M. following notice of arrival, 
the most practicable of the steps authorized by paragraph 1643 (a), as quoted above, 
must be taken to secure this removal. 

When available, Powder Magazines not on railway propert.y should be utilized 
for storage. 

Rule 7 — Claims 

No storage charges shall be collected under these rules for delays from causes 
named below. Storage charges assessed or collected under such conditions shall be 
promptly cancelled or refunded by the carrier. 

Causes 
Section A. — Weather Interference. 

Note.— A consignor or consignee shall not be absolved from storage under Section A of this rule if, 
considering the character of the freight, others similarly situated and under the same conditions reason- 
ably could and did deliver or remove freight during the same period of time. 

1. When the condition of the weather, during the prescribed free time, is such as 
to make it impossible to complete delivery of outbound shipments or remove in- 



FEEIGHT RATES 161 

bound freight from railroad premises without serious injury to the freight, the free 
time shall be extended until a total of forty-eight hours (24 hours on freight subject 
to Rule 3, Section B, Paragraphs 1 and 3) free from such weather interference shall 
have been allowed. 

2. When, because of high water or snow drifts it is impossible to remove freight 
from railroad premises during the prescribed free time. (See Note above.) 

Section B. — Denjand of Overcharge. 

When the carrier's agent demands the payment of transportation charges in ex- 
cess of tariff authority. 

Section C. — Delayed or Improper Notice. 

1. When notice of arrival does not contain all the information specified in Rule 2, 
Section A, the consignee shall not have the right to call in question the sufficiency of 
such notice unless within the prescribed free time he shall serve upon the railroad's 
agent a written request for the omitted information required, in which event the time 
between receipt of such request and the furnishing of the omitted information will 

^ not be computed against the consignee. 

2. When claim is made that a mailed notice has been delayed, the postmark 
thereon shall be accepted as indicating the date of the notice. 

3. When a notice is mailed by carrier on Sunday, a legal holiday, or after 3:00 
P.M. on other days (as evidenced by the postmark thereon^ the consignee shall be 
allowed five hours, additional free time, provided he shall mail or send to the carrier's 
agent, within the first twenty-four hours of free time, written advice that the notice 
had not been received until after the free time had begun to run. In case of failure on 
part of consignee so to notify carrier's agent, no additional free time shall be allowed. 

4. In case of failure by carrier to send or give notice in accordance with the pro- 
visions of Rule 2, Section B, no storage charges will be assessed against the consignor 
between the date on which the notice should have been sent or given and the date on 
which it was actually sent or given. 

5. When an order giving disposition of a shipment is sent to the railroad b}^ United 
States mail and the order is not received by the addressee, such order shall be con- 
sidered received as of the date it should have been delivered, provided proof is 
furnished by the claimant that the order was deposited in the mail properly stamped 
and addressed on the date claimed. In such event, storage charges shall not be 
assessed against the shipment during the time the railroad was unable to make 
deliver}^ by reason of non-receipt of the order. 

Section D. — Error of any railroad which prevents proper tender or delivery. 
Under this rule storage will be charged on the basis of the amount that would have 
accrued but for such error. 

Section E. — Delay by United States Customs. 

Such additional free time shall be allowed as has been lost through such delay. 

Circular No. 237. 

Cancels Circular No. 227. 



SWITCHING RATES, RULES AND REGULATIONS AT POINTS IN 
NORTH CAROLINA 

Rule 1. 

Carriers must furnish cars for loading, and must also accept from each other cars, 
loaded at warehouses or sidetracks of one carrier for dehvery at sidetracks or ware- 
houses of the other carriers within switching limits. 

Rule 2 — Switching Service 

Switching service, as referred to herein, is defined as a service performed to or 
from private or assigned sidings within switching limits, preceding or following a 
transportation movement. 

Rule 3 — Free Switching 

Cars handled in switching service loaded will be entitled to one free switch move- 
ment empty, including delivery to any connecting fine within switching limits, ex- 
cept as otherwise provided herein. 



162 n. c. cokporation commission 

Rule 4 — Minimum Weight for Switching Service 

(a) Cars will be placed on private or assigned sidings at all stations within switch- 
ing limits of carriers for the receipt or delivery of freight when in lots aggregating 
not less than the following quantities, viz.: 

Articles rated in Southern Classification No. 45 (Agent J. E. Crossland's ICC. 
No. 9, supplements thereto or reissues thereof) at Fifth Class or higher, and 
Leaf Tobacco 5^000 pounds 

Articles rated in Associated Railways and North Carolina Exception Sheets (Notes 
4 and 91, I. C. C. No. 4, Exception No. 1 to Southern Classification No. 45 (Agent 
J. E. Crossland's I. C. C. No. 9, supplements thereto or reissues thereof), in Classes 
"K" to "P," except brick or ice, L. C. L., carload minimum as per classification — 

' Brick or Ice, L. C. L 10,000 pounds 

All other freight 10,000 pounds 

Or 

(b) Freight without minimum when consisting of articles requiring special facilities 
for loading or unloading, when such facilities are not furnished; or 

Cotton without minimum when delivered to or received from compresses. 

Rule 5 — Excess Over Full Carload 

When a lot of freight is offered for shipment in one day on which carload rates are 
provided, in quantities exceeding the amount that can be loaded in one car, the sur- 
plus, loaded in a separate car, will be switched at the rates, rules and regulations 
shown herein. 

Rule 6 — Subsequent Switch Movement 

After delivery of carload freight has been accomplished either by placing on private 
or assigned sidings for delivery to consignee, or by storage, any subsequent move- 
ment will be subject to charges provided in Rule 9. 

Rule 7 — Interchange Switching Rates 

Carriers will switch carload traffic (as defined in Rule 4) between private or as- 
f signed sidings and the usual interchange tracks with connecting lines at such points, 
at the maximum rate of $2.50 per car. 

Rule 8 — Local Switching Movement 

A movement which begins and ends within switching limits and which is not in- 
cident to the forwarding or delivery of a shipment to or from a point without said 
limits and is not covered by these regulations, is a local switching movement and 
will be treated as such. (See Rule 9.) 

Rule 9 — Local Switching Rates 

That is^ switching of traffic which is loaded at one point in a town and is discharged 
at another point in the same town within switching limits, when the haul involved 
does not exceed a distance of three miles, and when the service performed apphes 
only on traffic originating and moving wholly within the State of North Carolina. 
(After cars are placed the owner must load or unload, as the case may be, within 
24 hours, otherwise the usual demurrage charges will appl3^) 

(a) When such traffic originates at and is discharged at points on the rails of one 
and the same carrier, the switching charges will be as shown in Paragraph (e). 

(b) When such traffic originates at a point on the rails of one carrier and is dis- 
charged at a point on the rails of another carrier the switching charges will be as 
shown in Paragraph (f). 

(c) When such traffic originates at and is discharged at the same plant or industry 
on the rails of one and the same company, the switching charges will be as shown in 
Paragraph (d). 

Definition of Intra-plant, Intra-terminal and Inter-terminal Switching 

Intra-Plant Switchinq: A switching movement from one track to another within 
the same plant or industry. 



FREIGHT KATES 



163 



Intra-Terminal Switching: A switching movement (other than Intra-Plant Switch- 
ing) from one track to another of the same road within the switching hmits of one 
station or industrial district. 

Inter-Terminal Switching: A switching movement from a track of one road to a 
track of another road when both tracks are within the switching hmits of the same 
station or industrial switching district. 

Switching Charges 
(Regardless of Weight or Contents) 

(d) Intra-Plant Switching $4.00 per car 

(e) Intra-Terminal Switching 6.50 per car 

(f ) Inter-Terminal Switching 6.50 per car 

Circular No. 225. 

Cancels Rules 13 and 14 of Circular 36, and Rules 30, 31 and 32, governing 
transportation of freight. 



RATES ON FERTILIZER CL 30,000 POUNDS MINIMUM IN CENTS PER 
TON 2,000 POUNDS 



Distance 



Rate 


Rate 


Single 


Joint 


Line 


Haul 


90 


113 


102 


135 


124 


147 


135 


158 


147 


180 


158 


180 


158 


192 


169 


203 


180 


203 


180 


214 


192 


214 


203 


225 


203 


237 


214 


237 


214 


248 


225 


259 


237 


259 


237 


270 


248 


270 


259 


282 


259 


293 


270 


293 


270 


304 


282 


315 


293 


327 



Distance 



Rate 
Single 
liine 



Rate 
Joint 
Haul 



5 miles and under. 
10 
15 
20 
25 
30 
35 
40 
45 
50 
55 



65 
70 
75 
80 
85 
90 
95 
100 
110 
120 
130 
140 
150 



5. 
10- 
15. 
20- 
25. 
30. 
35. 
40. 
45. 
50. 
55. 

eo. 

65. 

70. 

75. 

80. 

85. 

90. 

95. 
100. 
110. 
120- 
130. 
140. 



160 miles and 

170 

180 

190 

200 

210 

220 

230 

240 

250 

260 

270 

280 

300 

320 

340 

360 

380 

400 

420 

440 

460 

480 

500 



over 150 
160 
170 
180. 
190 
200 
210. 
220 
230 
240 
250 
260 
270 
280 
300 
320 
340 
360 
380 
400 
420 
440 
460 
480 



315 
315 
327 
327 
338 
349 
349 
360 
372 
372 
383 
383 
394 
405 
428 
439 
450 
462 
484 
495 
495 
507 
507 
518 



338 
349 
349 
360 
372 
372 
383 
383 
394 
405 
405 
417 
428 
439 
450 
.462 
484 
495 
507 
518 
540 
552 
563 
574 



These rates apply between all points in North Carolina on the hues of the Atlantic 
Coast Line Railroad; Atlantic and Yadkin Railway; Carolina and Northwestern Rail- 
way: Carohna and Tennessee Southern Railway; Carolina, Clinchfield and Ohio 
Railway; High Point, Randleman, Asheboro and Southern Railroad; Seaboard 
Air Line Railway; Southern Railway; Winston-Salem Southbound Railway; Yadkin 
Railroad, except where other specific rates are approved by the Commission. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

Jan. 10, 1923. Clerk. 

Circular No. 238. 

Cancels Circular No. 232. 



164 



N. C. COEPORATION COMMISSION 



RATES ON LUMBER CL MINIMUM WEIGHT 24,000 POUNDS IN CENTS 

PER 100 POUNDS 



Distance 


Single 
Line 


Joint 
Line 


Distance 


Single 
Line 


Joint 
Line 


5 miles and under 


2H 
3M 

4^2 

5 
6 

6H 

7 
8 

103^ 


4M 

5 

6 

8 

8H 

9 

lOH 
11 
11^ 


200 miles 
240 " 
280 " 
300 " 
320 " 
340 " 
360 " 
420 " 
460 " 
480 " 
500 " 


and over 170 


11 

IIH 

13 

13 

13J^ 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18H 

18H 


13 


10 " 




" 200 

" 240 

" 280 


15 " 

25 " 




' 10 

' 15 

' 25 

' 40 

' 55 

' 70 

' 90 

' 110 


13H 
14 


40 " 
55 " 


" " 300 

" 320 . 


15 
16 


70 " 


" 340 


16 


90 " 


" 360 - - 


17H 


110 " 


" 420 


I8}i 


140 " 


" 460 

" 480 


20 


170 " 




' 140 


20 



Applicable to all common carriers of the State having over seventy-five miles of 
rail within the State, except where other specific rates are approved by the Commis- 
sion. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

February 5, 1923. Cl^^k. 

Circular No. 239. 



LOGS ROUGH CL PER CAR 40,000 POUNDS EXCESS IN PROPORTION 

IN CENTS 



Distance 



5 miles and under. 



10 

15 

20 

25 

30 

35 

40 

45 

50 

55 

60 

65 

70 

75 

80 

85 

90 

100 

110 

120 

130 

140 

150 



over 5- 

" 10- 

" 15. 

" 20. 

" 25. 

" 30. 

" 35. 

" 40. 

" 45- 

" 50. 

" 55. 

" 60. 

" 65. 

" 70. 

" 75. 

" 80. 

" 85- 

" 90- 

" 100- 

" 110- 

" 120- 

" 130- 

" 140- 



Single 
Line 


Joint 
Line 


*720 


*1300 


*855 


*1400 


*1050 


*1600 


*1150 


*1700 


*1300 


*1850 


*1400 


*2000 


*1600 


*2150 


*1700 


*2250 


*1850 
*2000 
2150 
2250 
2450 
2500 
2700 


*2450 
*2500 
2700 
2850 
2950 
3100 
3300 



Distance 



170 
180 
190 
200 
210 
220 
230 
240 
250 
260 
270 
280 
300 
320 
340 
360 
380 
400 
420 
440 
460 
480 
500 



iles and over 150- 

" 160- 

" 170- 

" 180- 

" 190- 

" 200- 

" 210- 

" 220- 

" 230- 

" 240- 

" 250. 

" 260- 

" 270. 

" 280- 

" 300. 

" 320. 

" 340. 

" 360_ 

" " 380. 

" 400_ 

" 420- 

" 440_ 

" 460_ 

" 480_ 



Single 
Line 



2850 
2950 
2950 
3100 
3100 
3300 
3300 
3400 
3400 
3550 
3550 
3650 
3650 
3850 
3850 
3950 
4000 
4100 
4250 
4300 
4400 
4400 
4500 
4550 



Joint 
Line 



3400 
3550 
3550 
3650 
3650 
3825 
3825 
3950 
3950 
4100 
4100 
4250 
4250 
4400 
4450 
4500 
4550 
4700 
4750 
4850 
4950 
5000 
5100 
5150 



When rates are not shown for the exact distance, the charge shall not exceed the 
rate for the nearest distance. In case where the haul is equidistant the charge shall 
be that for the next higher distance. 

Applicable to all common carriers of the State having over seventy-five miles of 
rail within the State except where other specific rates are approved by the Com- 
mission. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

February 8, 1923. <^^^^^- 

Circular No. 240. 



FREIGHT RATES 



165 



CEMENT IN BAGS, ACTUAL WEIGHT; IN BBLS. ESTIMATED WEIGHT; 
(PORTLAND, 400 LBS; N. O. S., 300 LBS. PER BBL.), C. L. 40,000 LBS. 
MINIMUM, IN CENTS PER 100 LBS. 



Distance 



5 miles 

10 " 

15 " 

20 " 

25 " 

35 " 

50 " 

65 " 

SO " 

100 " 

120 " 

150 " 

170 " 



and under 

over 5_ 
10_ 
15_ 
20. 
25- 
35 _ 
50 _ 



100 _ 
120. 
150. 



Single 


Joint 


Line 


Line 


6 


7 


7 


8 


7 


834 


8 


9 


m 


9^ 


9 


lOH 


9^2 


11 


lOH 


11K2 


11 


IIM 


IIH 


nVi 


nVi 


13 


ny2 


13H 


13 


13H 



Distance 



Joint 
Line 



190 miles and over 

210 " 

230 " 

250 " 

270 " 

280 " 

300 " 

340 " 

380 " 

420 " 

460 " 

480 " 

500 " 




Applicable to all common carriers of the State having over seventy-five miles of 
rail within the State, except where other specific rates are approved by the Commis- 
sion. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

February 14, 1923. • C'Zer/c. 

Circular No. 241. 



LIME, OTHER THAN SPENT, IN BBLS. OR IN BULK, C. L., MINIMUM 
WEIGHT 24,000 LBS., EXCESS IN PROPORTION, IN CENTS PER 100 
LBS. 



Distance 



5 miles and under. 



10 

15 

20 

25 

35 

50 

65 

80 

100 

120 

150 



over 5. 

10. 

15. 
" 20. 
" 25. 
" 35. 
" 50. 
" 65. 
" 80. 
" 100. 
" 120. 



Single 


Joint 


Line 


Line 


4^ 


6 


6 


7 


6H 


7 


7 


8 


7 


8H 


8 


9 


m 


93^ 


9 


9^ 


93^ 


lOM 


9K2 


11 


lOH 


11^ 


11 


ny^ 



Distance 



170 mi 

190 

210 

230 

250 

270 

280 

300 

340 

380 

420 

460 



les and over 150 
170 
190 
210 
230 
250 
270 
280 
300 
340 
380 
420 



Single 
Line 



1134 

1134 

1234 

13 

133^ 

14 

15 

15 

16 

17 

18 

193^ 



Joint 
Line 



12^ 

13 

133^ 

14 

15 

15 

15H 

16 

17 

18 

1934 

20 



Applicable to all common carriers of the State having over seventy-five miles of 
rail within the State, except where other specific rates are approved by^'the Commis- 
sion. 

By order of the Commission: R, O. Self, 

February 14, 1923. Clerk. 



b 



PART TWO 



COMPILATION FROM ANNUAL STATISTICAL REPORTS OF ALL RAILROAD COMPANIES 

OPERATING IN NORTH CAROLINA, SHOWING CAPITALIZATION. OPERATING 

REVENUES, ETC., FOR YEARS ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1920 AND 1921 



ATLANTIC COAST LINE RAILKOAD 



ATLANTIC COAST LINE RAILROAD COMPANY 

Compilation of Railroad Returns for the Years Ending December 31, 1920 and 1921 
PRINCIPAL GENERAL OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




J. R. Kenly 

Lyman Delano 


Wilmington, N. C. 


Executive Vice-President, 


Wilmington, N. C. 


Vice-President 




Geo. B. Elliott 

R. A. Brand 

H. L. Borden 

H. L. Borden 

John T. Reid 

George B. Elliott 


Wilmington, N. C. 


Vice-President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

General Counsel 


Wilmington, N. C. 

New York, N. Y. 
New York, N. Y. 
Wilmington, N. C. 
Wilmington, N. C. 


Comptroller 


H. C. Prince 

P. R.Albright 

J. E. Willoughby 

C.J.Joseph 

R. D. Hawkins 


Wilmington, N. C. 


General Manager 


Wilmington, N. C. 


Chief Engineer 


Wilmington, N. C. 


Tax Agent 


Wilmington, N. C. 


General Superintendent, Motive Power 


Wilmington, N. C. 



DIRECTORS 

H.Walters, New York, N.Y.; George C. Jenkins, Baltimore, Md.; Waldo Newcomer, Baltimore, Md.; 
J. J. Nelligan, Baltimore, Md.; F. B. Adams, New York, N. Y.; F. W. Scott, Richmond, Va.; F. K. 
Borden, Goldsboro, N. C; Lyman Delano, Wilmington, N. C; George B. Elliott, Wilmington, N. C; 
Donald McRae, Wilmington, N. C; W. W. MacKall, Savannah, Ga.; H. L. Borden, New York, N. Y.; 
J. R. Kenly, Wilmington, N. C. 

HISTORY 

1. Exact name of common carrier making this report: Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company. 

2. Date of organization: The existing records of the company do not show the date of organization. 
The organization was doubtless effected soon after March 14, 1836, the date that the charter was granted 
by the General Assembly of Virginia. 

3. Under laws of what government, state or territory organized? If more than one, name them. 
Give reference to each statute and all amendments thereof: 

Chartered and organized as Richmond and Petersburg Railroad Company by and under an act of 
the General Assembly of Virginia passed March 14, 1836, being chapter 121 of the Acts of 1835-36. Amended 
by Acts of the General Assembly of Virginia as follows: Chapter 51, session 1853-54, passed February 
18, 1854; chapter 218, session 1865-66, passed December 12, 1865; chapter 74, session 1866-67, passed January 
16,1867; chapter 17, session 1869-70, approved March 5, 1870; chapter 635, session 1897-98, approved March 
1, 1898; chapter 18, session 1899-1900, approved January 12, 1900. 

Under the Act of the General Assembly of Virginia approved March 1, 1898, the Richmond and 
Petersburg Railroad Company purchased by deed from the Petersburg Railroad Company all of the 
property, rights, powers, privileges and franchises of the said Petersburg Railroad Company, which then 
became merged into the Richmond and Petersburg Railroad Company. The Petersburg Railroad 
Company had been chartered by an act of the General Assembly of Virginia passed February 10, 1830. 
Under the authority of said Act of March 1, 1898, the name of the Richmond and Petersburg Railroad 
Company was, November 21, 1898, changed to Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company of Virginia. 
April 21, 1900, the railroads, property, appurtenances and franchises of the Norfolk and Carolina Rail- 
road Company, the Wilmington and Weldon Railroad Company, and the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad 
Company of South Carolina were merged with and sold to the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company 
of Virginia, and the name of the company was changed to Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company; all 
under authority of said act of the General Assembly of Virginia, approved January, 12, 1900, and chapter 
105 of the Private Laws 6f North Carolina, session 1899, ratified February 24, 1899, and article 3 of chapter 
51 of the Civil Statute Laws of South Carohna, and chapter 50 of the Statutes at Large of South Carolina 
approved March 9, 1896. The Norfolk and CaroUna Railroad Company had been incorporated as the 
Chowan and Southern Railroad Company by act of the General Assembly of Virginia approved May 
5, 1887, and under an amendment approved January 27, 1888, the name was changed to Norfolk and 
Carohna Railroad Company. The Wilmington and Weldon Railroad Company had been chartered 
as the Wilmington and Raleigh Railroad Company by an act of the General Assembly of North Caro 
linaratified Januarys, 1834, and under an amendment ratified February 14, 1855, the name was changed 



4 N. C. CORPOKATION COMMISSION 

to Wilmington and Weldon Railroad Company. The Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company of 
South Carolina had been chartered by an act of the General Assembly of South CaroHna approved 
March 5, 1887. Under articles of agreement, consolidation and merger, made and entered into April 
10, 1902, all of the capital stock, property and franchise of the Savannah, Florida and Western Rail- 
way Company were merged with and sold to the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company. The said 
merger and sale of said properties of Savannah, Florida and Western Railway Company being into 
the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company, which was then and there a Virginia corporation, and 
being made on the part of the Atlantic Coast Line Company, under authority of its charter, the said 
acts of the General Assembly of Virginia, approved January 12, 1900, which said charter Hmited its 
actions thereunder to the acquisition by it of other railroad companies, by way of merger of such other 
railroad into their absorption by it, the said Atlantic Coast Line Railroad, and being authorized on 
the part of the other States in which the lines of the Savannah, Florida and Western Railway Company 
were incorporated by various statutes providing for and authorizing the merger, sale, and acquisition 
of such lines by other railroad companies, and in particular by article 3 of chapter 50 of the Code of 
South Carolina of 1902, and section 2179 of the Code of Georgia of 1895, and section 2248 of the Code of 
Florida, 1892, and chapter 4615, Laws of Florida of 1897, approved June 5, 1897, and section 1169 of the 
Code of Alabama of 1896, as amended by the acts approved February 7th, Laws of 1899. The Savannah, 
Florida and Western Railway Company had been chartered November 25, 1879, under the provisions 
of a general act of the Legislature of the State of Georgia, approved February 29, 1876, and this charter 
was amended by an act of the General Assembly of the State of Georgia approved September 13, 1891. 

Since April, 1902, the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company has lawfully acquired the property 
rights, powers, privileges and franchises of the following companies: 

St. Johns and Lake Eustis Railroad Company, by deed dated June 12, 1902. This company on 
June 8, 1896, filed application for charter under the laws of the State of Florida, and this charter was 
issued on September 5, 1896. The purchase of this property was made under authority of said act of 
the General Assembly of Virginia of January 12, 1900, and section 2246 of the Revised Statutes of Florida, 
1892, and chapter 4615 of the Laws of Florida, 1897, approved June 5, 1897. 

The Florida Southern Railroad Company, by deed dated March 19, 1903. This company on April 
27, 1892, filed application for charter under the general laws of Florida, and on the same date this char- 
ter was issued. The purchase of this property was made under the same authority as in the case of 
St. Johns and Lake Eustis Railroad Company. 

The Sanford and St. Petersburg Railroad Company by deed dated March 19, 1903. This com- 
pany on August 12, 1893, filed application for charter under the general laws of Florida, and this 
charter was issued October 26, 1893, and amended January 21, 1901. The purchase of this property was 
made under the same authority as in the case of St. Johns and Lake Eustis Railroad Company. 

Jacksonville and Southwestern Railroad Company, by deed dated July 28, 1904. This company 
on February 4, 1899, filed application for charter under the general laws of Florida, and this charter 
was issued March 11, 1899, and amended by certificate filed with and approved by the Secretary of State 
of Florida May 9, 1900. The purchase of this property was made under the same authority as in the 
case of St. Johns and Lake Eustis Railroad Company. 

The Winton and Bone Valley Railroad Company, by deed dated February 18, 1909. This com- 
pany on December 21, 1892, filed application for charter under the general laws of the State of Florida, 
and this charter was issed on the same date. The purchase of this property was made under author- 
ity of said act of the General Assembly of Virginia of January 12, 1900, and section 2812 and 2815 of 
the General Statutes of Florida, 1906. 

The Conway, Coast and Western Railroad Company, by deed dated July 1, 1912. This company 
was incorporated as the Conway and Seashore Railroad Company by an act of the General Assembly 
of South Carolina approved February 28, 1899. Under authority of the General Laws of South Caro- 
lina, the Secretary of State of South Carolina on July 28, 1904, granted an amendment of the charter 
and under said amendment the name of the company was changed to Conway, Coast and Western 
Railroad Company. The purchase of this property was made under authority of said act of the Gen- 
eral Assembly of Virginia approved January 12, 1900, and No. 446 of the acts of the General Assembly 
of South Carolina, session of 1912. 

Property of Sanford and Everglades Railroad Company, except its franchise, by deed of October 
15, 1913. This company was incorporated July 31, 1908, under the laws of the State of Florida. The 
purchase of this property was made under authority of said act of the General Assembly of Virginia 
of January 12, 1900, and sections 2812 and 2815 of the General Statutes of the State of Florida, 1906, as 
amended. 

Property formerly belonging to the Florida Central Railroad Company between Fincher and Fan- 
lew, in Florida, which was sold under foreclosure and conveyed to this company by deed, dated Feb- 
ruary 27, 1915, from the purchaser at said foreclosure sale. The purchase of this property was made 
under authority of said act of General Assembly of Virginia approved January 12, 1900, and sections 
2812 and 1815 of the General Statutes of Florida, 1906, as amended. 



ATLANTIC COAST LINE KAILROAD 



COMPARATIVE GENERAL BALANCE SHEET— ASSET SIDE 



Balance at 

Beginning of 

Year 1920 


Item 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1920 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1921 


$195 294 773 40 


Investments: 
Investment in road and equipment 


$197,393,495.79 

70,234.46 

1,198,838.28 

57,624,473.91 

4,745,605.76 

4,814,876.04 

900,926.22 

119,571.25 
1,787.500.00 

284,767.89 
918,741.81 


$205,157,102.56 


63 351 04 


Improvements on leased railway property 


70,234.46 


1 010 987 17 


Miscellaneous physical property 


1,272 847.68 


57 273 873 91 


Investments in affiliated companies: 
Stocks 


57,624 541.41 


4 745 605 76 


Bonds 


4,745,605.76 


4 347 495 72 


Notes 


5,171,076.04 


730 267 19 


Advances 


1,071,544.82 


233 971 25 


Other Investments: 
Stocks 


119,571.25 


4 328 900 00 


Bonds 


1,787,500.00 


291 455 01 


Notes 


284 609 66 


842,341.81 




1,162,848.96 




Total investments 




$269 163 022.26 


$269,858,631.41 


$278,467 482.60 




Current Assets: 
Cash 




$3 640 884.03 


$ 7,945,092.18 

952,371.89 

168,675.86 

3,343,743.12 

1,237,964.25 

11,052,813.08 

9,203,722.97 

1,706,495.71 

252,102.30 


$ 14 022 407 48 


560 091.67 


Special deposits 


1 185 298 52 


6,666.89 
152,776.45 

7,736,341.44 

20,903.48 

1,623,779.25 


Loans and bills receivable 

Traffic and car-service balances receivable 

Net balance receivable from agents and conductors 

Miscellaneous accounts receivable 

Material and suppHes 

Interest and dividends receivable 


105,802.19 
2,335,044.93 

789,982.60 
2,578,154.94 
7,454,612.23 
1,612,608.55 

130,434.82 








$ 13,741,448.21 


$ 35,862,981.46 


$ 30,214,346.26 




Deferred Assets: 
Working fund advances 

Insurance and other funds 




$ 7,090.89 


$ 38,573.04 

363,614.07 

20,567,189.06 


1 28,303.84 
384,150 57 


17,013,642.82 


Other deferred assets __ _ _ 


8,658,951.84 




Total deferred assets 




$ 17,020,133.71 


$ 20.969,376.17 


$ 9,071,406.25 




Unadjusted Debits: 
Other unadjusted debits 




$ 1,037,080.72 


$ 7,420,979.12 


$ 736 505.48 




Total unadjusted debits 

Grand total 




$ 1,037,080.72 


$ 7,420,979.12 


$ 736,505.48 


$300,961,684.90 


$334,111,968.16 


$318,489,740.59 









N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



COMPARATrVE GENERAL BALANCE SHEET-LI ABILJTY SIDE 



Balance at 

Beginning of 

Year 1920 



Item 



Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1920 



Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1921 



i 68,770,900.00 
4,825,242.50 



$ 73,596,142.50 



Stock: 
Capital stock 

Premium on capital stock. 

Total stock 



$142,250,765.00 



$142,250,765.00 



170,000.00 

29,484.75 

31,396.59 

78,034.71 

506,273.34 

5,850.75 

21,000.00 

2,399,579.00 

1,177,178.74 



Long-Term Debt: 
Funded debt unmatured _ 

Total long-term debt, 



Current Liabilities: 

Loans and bills payable 

Traffic and car-service balances payable. 

Audited accounts and wages payable 

Miscellaneous accounts payable 

Interest matured unpaid 

Dividends matured unpaid 

Funded debt matured unpaid 

Unmatured dividends declared 

Unmatured interest accrued 

Unmatured rents accrued 



$ 4,418,797.! 



Total current liabilities. 



$ 11,638,563.71 



Deferred Liabilities: 
U. S. Government deferred liabilities. 
Other deferred liabilities 



$ 11,638,563.71 



Total deferred liabilities. 



$ 557,355.19 

475,371.02 

318,355.81 

1,914,885.45 

13,872,744.61 

6,927,617.49 



Unadjusted Credits: 
Tax liability 

Insurance and casualty reserves 

Operating reserves 

Accrued depreciation — Road 

Accrued depreciation — Equipment. 
Other unadjusted credits 



$ 24,066,329.57 



Total unadjusted credits. 



$ 63,782,900.00 
4,829,442.50 



$ 68,782,900.00 
4,829,442.50 



$ 73,612,342.50 



$ 73,612.342.50 



$154,349,055.00 



$158,173,130.00 



$154,349,055.00 



$158,173,130.00 



190,000.00 

2,060,389.54 

7,830,425.14 

802,762.04 

497,763.34 

5,850.75 

3,000.00 

2,400,517.00 

1,404,019.49 

6,494.25 



170,000.00 

1,036,375.10 

4,009,025.58 

624,368.02 

473,555.84 

5,850.75 

6,000.00 

2,400,517.00 

1,513,261.24 

1,356.25 



$ 15,201,221.55 



$ 10,240,309.78 



$ 16,488,620.87 



$ 5,039,301.97 
$ 401,799.22 



,620.87 



$ 5,441,101.19 



$ 1,397,729.07 

501,346.04 

665,018.75 

1,022,841.06 

15,216,091.85 

7,472,310.75 



$ 1,456,904.84 
531,115.06 
937,130.91 



16,158,103.61 
2,172,445.19 



$ 26,275,337.52 



$ 21,255, 



.61 



683,004.86 



$ 683,004.86 
44,308,081.38 



Corporate Surplus: 
Additions to property through income and surplus 



Total appropriated surplus. 
Profit and loss balance 



865,265. 



$ 1,062,509.26 



$ 865,265.16 
47,320,125.56 



$ 1,062,509.26 
48,704,648.25 



$ 44,991,086.24 



$300,961,684.90 



Total corporate s urplus. 
Grand total 



$ 48,185,390.72 



$ 49.767, 157«51 



$334,111,968.16 



$318,489,740.59 



ATLANTIC COAST LINE RAILROAD 







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10 



C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



RAILWAY OPERATING REVEN UES— ENTIRE LINE 





1920 


1921 


Class of Railway Operating 
Revenues 


Total Amount 
of Revenue 
for the Year 


Comparison 
With Total 
Revenue of 
Preceding 

Year 
Increase 


Total Amount 
of Revenue 
for the Year 


Comparison 
With Total 
Revenue of 
Preceding 

Year 
Increase 


Freight 


$ 48,193,386.71 

19,138,399.42 

145,741.83 

46.30 

2,578,457.79 

1,935,414.52 

176,801.03 

7,970.42 

358,734.96 

57,667.69 

3,259.00 

3,036.06 


$ 7,351,274.51 

690,170.69 

17,879.40 

31.05 

1,811,468.98 

130,053.12 

165,604.85 

*1,048.69 

100,150.52 

5,855.08 

*4,026.00 

2,495.36 


$ 44,556,741.27 

16,787,056.28 

132,748.47 

1,355,220.72 

1,798,367.83 

226,356.36 

8,372.93 

307,175.00 

56,098.52 

4,006.50 

867.30 


$ *3, 636, 645. 44 




*2, 351, 343. 14 


Excess baggage 


*12 993 36 


Parlor and chair car 


*46 30 


Mail 


*1 223 237 07 


Express 


*137 046 69 


Other passenger-train 


49 555.33 


Milk 


402.51 


Switching 


*51,559.96 


Special service train 


*1,569.17 


Other freight-train 


747.50 


Water transfers — Freight 


*2,168.76 






Total rail-line transportation 


$ 72,598,915.73 


$ 10,269,908.87 


$ 65,233,011.18 


$ *7, 365, 904. 55 








$ 448,439.60 

60,724.59 

3,370.94 

250,692.47 

3,851.35 

350,057.98 

19,243.01 
273,041.42 


$ 84,316.14 

12,534.67 

447.54 

125,678.64 

1,357.71 

99,365.34 

6,292.21 
80,616.61 


$ 375,552.20 

73,895.30 

2,030.05 

242,793.96 

3,005.77 

221.689.45 

30,784.14 
432,741.49 


$ *72 887 40 


Station, train, and boat privileges... 


13,170.71 
*1,340.89 


Storage — Freight 


*7,898.51 




*845.38 


Demurrage 


*128,378.58 


Rents of buildings and other 
property 


11,541.13 


Miscellaneous 


159,700.07 


Total incidental operating revenue 


1 1,409,421.36 


$ 410,608.86 


$ 1,382,492.36 


$ *26,929.00 




$ 121,847.94 
*8,229.33 


$ *117,579.28 
1.98 


$ 120,522.60 
5,258.32 


$ 1,325.34 




2,971.01 






Total joint facility operating revenue 


$ 113,618.61 


$ *117,577.30 










Total railway operating revenues . 


$ 74,121,955.70 


$ 10,962,940.43 


8 66,730,767.82 


S *7, 391, 187.98 



^Decrease. 



ATLANTIC COAST LINE KAILKOAD 



11 



RAILWAY OPERATING REVENUES— WITHI N THE STATE 





1920 


Class of Railway Operating Revenues 


On Intrastate 
Traffic 


On Interstate 
Traffic 


Freight 


$ 2,490,091.86 
1,996,015.04 

8,548.92 


$ 9,982,252.17 


Passenger 


2,712,851.77 




22,701.19 


Parlor and chair car 


2.00 


Mail 


171,496.53 
123,935.19 
10,843.85 
1,023.82 
44,223.12 
12,694.21 


400,158.58 


Express 


289,182.12 


Other passenger-train 


28,264.64 


Milk 




Switching 




Special service train 


4,209.37 






Total rail-line transportation revenue 


1 4,858,872.54 


$ 13,439,617.84 






Dining and buffet 




S 106 066.00 


Station, train, and boat privileges 


$ 8,714.55 

1,191.64 

75,610.16 

824.66 

92,024.12 

1.037.51 

7,031.30 


8,828.03 


Parcel room 




Storage — Freight 




Storage — Baggage 




Demurrage 




Rents of buildings and other property 




Miscellaneous 


21 941 88 






Total incidental operating revenue 


$ 186,433.94 


$ 136,835.91 






Joint facility — Cr. 


$ 1,565.63 
91.50 




Joint facility — Dr. 








Total joint facility operating revenue 


1 1,474.13 








Total railway operating revenues 


$ 5,046,780.61 


% 13,576,453.75 



12 



C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES 



Name of Railway Operating Expense 
Account 



Amount of Operating Expenses for the Year 



Entire Line 



I. Maintenance of Way and Structures 

Superintendence 

Roadway maintenance — Yard 

Roadway maintenance — Other 

Bridges, trestles, and culverts— Yard 

Bridges, trestles, and culverts — Other 

Ties— Yard 

Ties— Other 

Rails — Yard 

Rails — Other 

Other track material — Yard 

Other track material — Other 

Ballast — Yard 

Ballast— Other 

Track laying and surfacing— Yard 

Track laying and surfacing — Other 

Right-of-way fences — Yard 

Right-of-way fences — Other 

Crossings and signs — Yard 

Crossings and signs — Other 

Station and office buildings 

Roadway buildings 

Water stations 

Fuel stations 

Shops and enginehouses 

Storage warehouses 

Wharves and docks 

Telegraph and telephone lines 

Signals and interlockers 

Miscellaneous structures 

Paving 

Roadway machines 

Small tools and supplies 

Removing snow, ice, and sand 

Assessments for public improvements 

Injuries to persons 

Insurance 

Stationery and printing 

Other expenses 



Total . 



1920 



Maintaining joint tracks, yards, and other 
facilities— Dr 

Maintaining joint tracks, yards, and other 
facilities — Cr 



Total maintenance of way and structures 



444, 

81, 

2,047, 

11, 

1,171, 

156. 

2,304, 

44, 

14, 

660, 

185, 

366, 

3,279, 



67, 
442, 

88, 
169, 

56, 

122, 

3, 

144, 

64, 

176, 

7, 

22, 

76, 

107. 

1, 



612.91 
189.30 
541.45 
442.71 
279.63 
019.27 
852.43 
993.69 
798.30 
658.39 
843.36 
236.82 
556.42 
866.98 
367.52 
76.16 
341.66 
368.81 
440.71 
983.75 
502.56 
375.30 
830.36 
980.69 
008.99 
605.69 
543.84 
376.49 
387.68 
089.95 
960.71 
756.71 
981.09 



40,780.85 
62,697.55 
20,357.44 
29,372.75 

$12,491,578.63 



$ 186,820.38 
371,886.06 



$12,306,513.15 



1921 



420 

85 

685 

9 

921 

265 

2,024 

34 

575 

102 



259 

288 

2,024 

39 
7 

60 
329 

51 
119 

57 
151 

164 
76 

173 

7 

30 



,445.59 
,647.44 
,931.85 
,330.21 
,648.47 
,566.54 
,021.25 
,425.62 
,548.82 
,580.18 
,463.84 

705.19 
,304.21 
,819.22 
,939.30 

795.69 
,213.42 
,509.86 
,965.71 
,988.44 
,524.91 
,082.86 
,499.96 
,219.14 

182.57 
,300.64 
,687.99 
,478.52 
,707.28 
,883.64 
,407.52 
,535.59 
,349.58 
,413.09 
,508.74 
,092.78 
,887.33 
,457.47 



$ 9,! 



$ 210,403.79 
240,027.32 



$ 9,859,444.65 



Within the State 



1921 



111,709.53 $ 

20,398.91 

514,447.25 

2,874.99 

294,285.39 

39,200.03 

579,096.94 

249.67 

11,255.63 

3,682.94 

166,037.68 

59.50 

46,621.27 

92,175.77 

823,945.03 

19.13 

8,628.38 

92.66 

16,944.36 

106,275.17 

22,236.37 

42,555.75| 

14,278.701 

30.899.05 

756.01 

36,332.35 

16,216.72 

44,314.80 

1,856.16 

5,550.13 

19,336.47 

27,074.00 

497.75 



10,246.24 
15,752.34 
5,240.46 
7,379.94 



104,379.03 

21,313.11 

170,650.59 

2,321.79 

236,593.69 

67.080.83 

503,336.11 

8.566.71 

139.603.66 

25,526.77 

158,857.38 

175.48 

64,140.19 

71.871.80 

503,836.96 

198.01 

9,743.78 

1,868.81 

15,155.81 

81,968.85 

12,800.76 

29,728.24 

16,750.49 

37,562.23 

45.43 

40,885.19 

19,078.79 

43.327.99 

1,920.42 

7,684.10 

14,987.96 

24,127.52 

883.53 

2,093.57 

5,260.79 

12,963.13 

4.447.61 

1.406.27 



$ 3,138.524.17$ 2,463.093.38 



$ 46,938.85 
93,436.82 



$ 3,092,026.20 



$ 52,929.12 
60.662.41 



$ 2.455,360.09 



ATLANTIC COAST LINE EAILROAD 



13 



RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES— Continued 



Name of Railway Operating Expense 
Account 



Amount of Operating Expenses for the Year 



Entire Line 



1921 



Within the State 



1920 



1921 



II. Maintenance of Equipment 

Superintendence 

Shop machinery 

Steam locomotives — Repairs 

Steam locomotives — Depreciation,.. 

Steam locomotives — Retirements 

Freight-train cars — Repairs 

Freight-train cars — Depreciation 

Freight-train cars — Retirements 

Passenger-train cars — Repairs 

Passenger-train cars — Depreciation.. 
Passenger-train cars — Retirements... 

Floating equipment — Repairs 

Floating equipment — Depreciation.. 

Work equipment — Repairs 

Work equipment — Depreciation 

Work equipment — Retirements 

Injuries to persons 

Insurance 

Stationery and printing 

Ot her expenses 

Total 

Maintaining joint equipment at 
terminals — Dr. 

Maintaining joint equipment at 
terminals — Cr 

Total maintenance of equipment.. 

III. Traffic: 

Superintendence 

Outside agencies 

Advertising 

Traffic associations 

Fast freight lines 

Industrial and immigration bureaus 

Insurance 

Stationery and printing 

Other expenses 

Total 



425,683.17 

343.705.82 

6,847,686.38 

474,890.55 

2,396.32 

6,015,231.16 

905,275.49 

51,248.74 

1,523,569.88 

118,508.85 

4.095.38 

45,795.01 

3,778.42 

193,664.06 

26,748.70 

542.53 

48,944.26 

46,186.97 

31,620.55 

2,159.92 



436 

311 

5,795 

461 

21 

5,390 

879 

16 

1,478 

121 

3 

21 

3 

151 

25 

6 

26 

52 

24 

7 



,243.08 
,429.55 
,269.32 
,074.18 
,431.05 
,254.30 
,423.69 
,64L44 
,610.13 
,980.82 
,237.69 
,232.36 
,978.38 
.410.58 
,439.05 
,145.24 
,128.51 
.536.76 
,073.95 
,051.97 



106 

86 

1,720 

119 

1,511 

227 

12 

382 

29 

1 

11 

48 
6 

12 
11 

7 



,953.41 
,356.50 
,489.42 
,316.12 

602.03 
,334.05 
,451.55 
,876.31 
,798.76 
,775.49 
.028.97 
,508.05 

919.33 
,658.33 
,720.64 

136.31 
,297.31 
,604.53 
,944.70 

542.68 



108,569.59 

77,282.91 

1,389,574.79 

114,736.93 

11,969.02 

1,339,328.20 

218,84L95 

1,937.04 

367,667.46 

30,354.56 

805.70 

5,285.00 

940.24 

37,564.39 

6,330.43 

1,535.07 

6,175.35 

13,073.61 

5,993.51 

1,754.86 



S16,995,166.22 
47,192.59 
16,768.48 



$15,200,129.14 

38,397.84 

3,745.21 



% 4,270.055.90 
11,857.20 
4,213.10 



$ 3,736,406.71 

9.555.19 

931.98 



$17,025,590.33 



$15,234,781.77 



S 4,277,700.00 



$ 3,745,029.92 



365,293.01 

317,559.68 

59,329.84 

45,489.91 

15.00 

15,083.39 

188.06 

214,480.12 

728.63 



$ 394,086.83 

414,072.46 

69,225.45 

34,940.82 



11,523.22 

204.68 

236,673.94 

296.40 



91,780.31 

79,787.25 

14,906.69 

11,429.39 

3.77 

3,789.72 

47.25 

53,888.39 

183.07 



$ 98,063.73 

103,038.47 

17,232.67 

8,737.18 



2,866.32 

50.92 

58,897.02 

73.76 



$ 1,018,167.64 



$ 1,161,023.75 



$ 255, 815. S 



288,960.07 



14 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES— Con^mued 



Name of Railway Operating Expense 
Account 



IV. Transportation— Rail Line: 

Superintendence 

Dispatchi ng trains 

Station employees 

Weighing, inspection, and demurrage 

bureau.; 

Station supplies and expenses 

Yardmasters and yard clerks 

Yard conductors and brakemen 

Yard switch and signal tenders 

Yard enginemen 

Fuel for yard locomotives 

Water for yard locomotives 

Lubricants for yard locomotives 

Other supplies for yard locomotives 

Enginehouse expenses — Yard 

Yard supplies and expenses 

Train enginemen 

Fuel for train locomotives 

Water for train locomotives 

Lubricants for train locomotives 

Other supphes for train locomotives 

Enginehouse expenses — Train 

Trainmen 

Train supphes and expenses 

Signal and interlocker operation 

Crossing protection 

Drawbridge operati on 

Telegraph and telephone operation 

Operating floating equipment 

Stationery and printing 

Other expenses 

Insurance 

Clearing wrecks 

Damage to property 

Damage to live stock on right of way .._ 

Loss and damage — Freight 

Loss and damage — Baggage 

Injuries to persons 

Total ._ 

Operating joint yards and terminals — Dr. 
Operating joint yards and terminals — Cr. 
Operating joint tracks and facilities — Dr. 
Operating joint tracks and facilities— Cr. 

Total transportation — Rail line 

VI. Miscellaneous Operations: 
Dining and buffet service 

Total miscellaneous operations 



Amount of Operating Expenses for the Year 



Entire Line 



1920 



896,455.43 
673,225.46 
,110,120.10 



87 

303 

746 

1,612 

17 

1,015 

1,412 

57 

13 

21 

423 

54 

3,104 

7,508 

297 

109 

115 

1,411 

4,058 

1,169 

132 

158 

57 

22 

51 

268 

24 

101 

309 

165 

319 

2,532, 

12, 

666, 



,591.71 
,707.66 
,887.35 
,326.75 
,527.97 
,707.68 
,248.91 
,075.34 
,358.32 
,243.21 
,206.92 
,511.72 
,225.07 
,441.35 
,249.97 
,431.39 
,746.81 
,477.25 
,878.50 
,208.25 
,677.46 
,853.88 
,310.59 
,165.85 
,234.56 
,074.21 
,298.21 
,610.77 
,433.16 
,370.14 
,161.31 
,890.15 
,472.36 
,583.18 



136,041,988.95 



956,045.76 

514,380.88 

46,257.12 

163,768.44 



$36,366,142.51 



$ 471,089.81 



$ 471,089.81 



1921 



I 841,899.77 

604,334.72 

4.640,205.84 



113 

284 

763 

1,196 

17 

786 

1,156 

39 

10 

16 

320 

54 

2,572 

6,641 

227, 

112 

91 

1,093, 

3,230, 

1,034, 

119 

140 

41, 

20, 

32, 

193, 

26, 

84, 

166 

105, 

221, 

1,792, 

10, 

561, 



,710.22 
,257.95 
,955.02 
,302 
,085.40 
,277.62 
,876.52 
,450.94 
,434.95 
,185.36 
,985.20 
,499.56 
,663.88 
,467.41 
,029.30 
,033.61 
,717.03 
,384.06 
,208.90 
,934.96 
,879.37 
,061.16 
, 280. 13 
,624.62 
,948.25 
,379.52 
,847.69 
,682.17 
,246.97 
,792.86 
469.82 
027.12 
,377.42 
341.58 



$29,387,061.87 



813,739.00 

368,490.15 

31,679.09 

160,583.40 



$29,703,406.41 



$ 386,318.51 



),318.51 



Within the State 



1920 



225,235.50 

169,148.70 

1,535.175.01 

22,007.52 

76,306.93 

187,656.84 

405,099.03 

4,403.92 

255,197.77 

354,829.23 

14,340.25 

3,356.30 

5,337.38 

106,331.25 

13,696.14 

779,940.27 

1,886,504.90 

74,684.41 

27,494.77 

29,081.53 

354,635.35 

1,019,798.09 

293,764.98 

33,335.37 

39,912.23 

14,399.35 

5,569.20 

12,872.74 

67,353.97 

6,104.95 

25,529.83 

77,745.45 

41,549.45 

80,189.66 

636,391.69 

3,133.70 

167,479.82 



$ 9,055,592.9: 



240,207.64 

129,238.81 

11,622.16 

41,147.02 



$ 9,137,( 



$ 118,561.! 



$ 118,561. 



1921 



$ 209,497.31 

150,385.87 

1,155,967.90 



29 
34 
10 
5 
13 
48 

21 
41 
40 
57 

571 
2 

192 



.296.45 
.701.29 
.143.20 
. 705. 67 
.251.65 
.665.72 
.933.55 
,822.96 
,578.36 
.026.95 
,846.90 
.544.88 
.326.57 
.993.00 
,463.61 
,746.06 
,705.95 
.996.52 
,668.63 
.365.56 
.790.86 
,854.34 
,273.66 
.181.20 
,188.17 
,103.52 
,777.65 
.072.91 
,819.80 
.915.97 
.187.80 
,007.29 
,901.22 
,128.53 



$ 7,514.837.08 



202.875 73 
91.676.80 
7.884.33 
39,887.01 



$ 7.594.033.33 



96,149.67 



96,149.67 



I 



ATLANTIC COAST LINE RAILROAD 



15 



RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES— Continued 





Amount of Operating Expenses for the Year 


Name of Railway Operating Expense 
Account 


Entire Line 


Within the State 




1920 


1921 


1920 


1921 


VIL General: 
Salaries and expenses of general officers... 
Salaries and expenses of clerks and 
attendants 


1 163,065.06 

850, 179.. 00 
31,634.97 

293,495.08 
1,145.35 

134,690.65 
46,097.41 
87,031.78 
59,904.39 

120,498.03 


1 168,518.46 

847,821.90 
32,471.76 

268,795.62 
1,123.38 
67,238.21 
58,364.05 
61,450.04 
53,314.55 
75,782.41 


$ 40,970.29 

213,608.49 
7.948.32 
73,740.99 
237.77 
33,841.19 
11,582.03 
21,866.84 
15,051.05 
30,275.28 


$ 41,934.12 
211,196.10 


General office supplies and expenses 

Law expenses 


8.073.71 
68,660.04 


Insurance 


279.55 


Relief department expenses 


17,738.39 


Pensions 


14,523.72 


Stationery and nrintino' 


15,285.36 


Valu tion expenses 


13.506.06 


Other expenses 


19,020.09 






Total 


$ 1,787.741,72 

27,058.61 

1,297.30 


1 1,634,850.40 

35,889.93 

1,091.53 


1 449,172.25 

6,798.51 

325.95 


$ 410,217.14 


General joint facilities— Dr 

General joint facilifes— Cr 


9,006.09 
271.62 


Total general expenses 


1 1,813,503.03 


$ 1,669,648.80 


$ 455,644.81 


$ 418,951.61 


VHI. Transportation for Investment— 
Cr 


1 7,144.30 


1 8,791.20 


$ 1,795.01 


$ 2,218.89 






Grand total railway operating expenses 


$68,993,862.17 


158,005,832.69 


$17,334,790.66 


$14,596,265.80 



Operating ratio (ratio of operating expenses to operating revenues), 1920, 93.08 per cent; 1921, 86. ^ 
per cent. 



I 



EMPLOYEES AND THEIR COMPENSATION 



1920 



1921 



Number of employees . 
•Compensation 



24,990 
$41,024,039.94 



21,967 
$31,857,368.52 



16 



N. C. CORPOKATION COMMISSION 



REVENUE— FREIGHT CARRI ED— ENTI RE LINE 





For Year 1920 


For Year 1921 


Commodity 


Carloads 


Tons 


Carloads 


Tons 


Products of Agriculture: 
Wheat ^-.._ 


171 

1,890 

3,518 

993 

5,233 

8,446 

16,160 

13,080 

32,717 

14,241 

28,606 

17,157 

9,401 

15,455 

391 

4,032 


5,166 

41,443 

78,025 

18,242 

109,462 

164,713 

201,828 

140,716 

231,639 

299,126 

419,390 

215.867 

157,977 

186,367 

7,127 

69,355 


218 

1,613 

3,269 

1,232 

6,250 

6,886 

9,064 

13,907 

29,001 

20,639 

27,018 

17,693 

6,416 

16,020 

596 

6,178 


6,476 




34,639 


Oats 


66,658 


Other grain 


20 591 


Flour and meal 


108 759 


Other mill products 


117 716 


Hay, straw, and alfalfa 


112,100 


Tobacco 


138,012 


Cotton 


198,453 


Cotton seed and products, except oil 


412,501 


Citrus fruits 


388,178 


Other fresh fruits 


234,668 


Potatoes 


109,555 




212,119 




9,655 




94,850 






Total . - - - ... .- 


171,491 


2,346,443 


168,270 


2,264,930 






Animals and Products: 


2,824 
2,290 

112 
1,866 

451 

3,433 

75 

439 

126 


29,677 
24,391 

1,185 
18.877 

5,743 

53,212 

767 

4,928 

1,505 


1,513 

1,641 

51 

2,227 

2,184 

2,718 

156 

737 

211 

3 

184 

620 


15,569 




17,141 




511 


Hogs 


21,593 




30,572 




43,068 


Poultry 

Eggs 

Butter and cheese 


1,774 
8,101 
2,239 


Wool 


30 


Hides and leather 


134 

955 


1,898 
16.618 


3,041 




9,118 






Total 


12,705 


158,801 


12,245 


152,747 


Products of Mines: 

Anthracite coal : 

Bituminous coal 

Coke - 


487 

23,890 

347 

398 

22,964 

106 

268 

1,188 

60,318 


23,047 

1,159,184 

10,394 

17,705 

912,544 

2,691 

8,927 

32,036 

2,404.003 


339 
19,289 

343 

39 

26,191 


14,993 

931,575 

10,794 




1,924 




1,073,215 


Crude petroleum 




Asphaltum 

Salt 


263 

1.160 

26,834 


9,044 

22,783 

1,111,429 






Total 


109,966 


4,570,531 


74,458 


3,175,757 







ATLANTIC COAST LINE RAILROAD 



17 



REVENUE— FREIGHT CARRI ED— ENTI RE UNE— Continued 



Commodity 



For Year 1920 



Carloads 



Tons 



For Year 1921 



Carloads 



Tons 



Products of Forests: 

Logs, posts, poles, and cordwood 

Ties 

Pulp wood 

Lumber, timber, boxshooks, staves, and headings 
Other products of forests 



Total. 



Manufactures and Miscellaneous: 

Refined petroleum and its products 

Vegetable oils 

Sugar, sirup, glucose, and molasses 

Boats and vessel supplies . 

Iron, pig and bloom 

Rails and fastenings 

Bar and sheet iron, structural iron, and iron pipe. 

Other metals, pig, bar, and sheet 

Castings, machinery, and boilers 

Cement 

Brick and artificial stone 

Lime and plaster 

Sewer pipe and drain tile 

Agricultural implements and vehicles other than 

aut omobiles 

Automobiles and auto trucks ■ 

Household goods and secondhand furniture 

Furniture (new) 

Beverages 

Ice 



Fertilizers (all kinds) 

Paper, printed matter, and books 

Chemicals and explosives 

Textiles 

Canned goods (all canned food products). 
Other manufactures and miscellaneous 



Total- 



68,558 

7,941 

70 

108,107 

221 



184,897 



26,492 

1,686 

5,462 

7,723 

421 

924 

3,639 

3 

5,967 

3,817 

11,301 

3,679 

1,405 

1,981 
8.002 
4,794 

337 

570 

6,793 

68,594 

873 
1,042 
1,660 

513 
37,457 



205,135 



1,609,390 
228,901 

1,770 
2,665,512 

2,288 



4,507,? 



716,239 

50,616 

151,242 

102,797 

14,258 

30,506 

101,152 

63 

120,104 

124,810 

353,473 

91.283 

25,702 

25,718 

58,907 

47,370 

2,985 

9,856 

91,870 

1,754,802 

16,833 

30,361 

18,491 

11,779 

623.974 



59,875 
6,146 

130 
90,953 

188 



157,292 



23.781 
2.013 
2.567 
8,430 
128 
642 
2,193 



3,457 
4.361 
9,961 
2,664 
1,626 

374 
3,753 
2,679 

375 

315 

5.182 

37,625 

1,074 

285 
3,224 

640 
24,000 



4,583,191 



139,349 



Grand total, carload traffic 

Merchandise — all L. C. L. freight, 



684,204 



16,166,827 
1,158,089 



551,614 



Grand total, carload and L. C. L. traffic. 



684,204 



17,324,916 



551,614 



1,426,102 

167,631 

3,333 

2,165,76 

2,158 



3,764,980 



627.174 
60,765 
45.111 
85.898 
4,673 
20,632 
62,146 



67,649 
143,763 
293,719 
53,902 
27,156 

4,576 
23,528 
22,812 

2,857 

5,721 

73,378 

783.346 

20.333 

7.054 

32.746 

14.674 

379.775 



2,863,388 



12,221,802 
958.312 



13,180,114 



18 



X. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATI ONS— ENTI RE LINE 



Item 


Amount 


1920 


1921 


Average mileage of road operated miles 

Train-miles: 


4,889.76 

7,649,300 
77,107 


4.893.05 
6,632,785 


Freight— light --- - 


61,732 






Freight— total 


7,726,407 


6,694,517 








9,371,363 

663,225 

15,776 


9.126,255 


Mixed 


648,204 


Special 


15,228 






Total transportation service 


17,776,771 


16.484,204 






Work service 


555,357 


344.254 






Locomotive-miles:, 


7,732.624 
31,019 
125,400 


6,697.674 




41.603 


Freight— light _ . 


107.279 






Freight— total .---._.._ 


7,889,043 


6.846,586 








9,373,226 
37,023 
175,120 


9.126.822 




8.917 




170,811 






Passenger — total 


9,585,369 


9,306,550 






Mixed train — principal 


663,251 

88 

7.323 


648.489 


Mixed train — helper 


228 


Mixed train — light 


8,636 






Mixed train — total 


670,662 


657.353 






Special — principal 


15,775 
48 
96 


15.228 




173 




85 


• 






15,920 


15,486 








616,005 


491,629 








3,525,495 
260,500 


2,619,917 




2.55,470 






Vard switching- — total 


3,785,995 


2,875.387 






Total transportation service 


22,562,994 


20.192,961 






Work service 


968,525 


656.220 



ATLAN^TIC COAST LINE RAILROAD 



19 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— ENTIRE LINE— Continued 





Amount 


Item 


1920 


1921 


Car-miles: 


174,961,804 
83,956,856 


153,577,790 




94,704,008 






Sum of loaded and empty 


258,918,860 
7,836,005 


248 281 798 


Freight train — caboose 


6 786 550 






Freight train — total 


266,754,665 


255 068 348 






Passenger train — passenger 


21,426,836 
7,094,356 
1,626,749 

20,706,812 


19 830 779 


Passenger train — sleeping, parlor, and observation 


16 504 657 


Passenger train — dining 


1 544 531 


Passenger train — otlier 


21 466 726 






Passenger train— total 


60,854,735 


59,326,693 


Mi xed train— freight— loaded 

Mixed train — freight — empty 


3,012,009 

1,313,207 

54,162 

1,042,699 

115.630 


3,324,278 
1 634 944 


Mixed train — caboose 


76 295 


Mixed train — passenger 


992 423 


Mixed train— other passenger-train 


312,849 


Mixed train — total 


5,537,707 


6 340 786 






Special train — freight — loaded 


111,886 

14,440 

30.132 

10,302 

1.511 


140 125 


Special train — caboose 


15 094 


Special train — passenger 


28 562 


Special train — sleeping, parlor, and observation 


17 344 


Special train — other passenger -train 


5 394 






Special train — total 


168,271 


206 579 






Total transportation service 


333,315,396 


320 942 348 






Work service 


3,857,263 


3 176 294 






Freight Service: 
Tons — revenue freight 


17,324,916 
3,420,297 


13 180 114 


Tons — nonrevenue freight 


3 489 887 






Tons— total 


20,745,213 


16 670 001 






Ton-miles — revenue freight - - 


3,290,282,723 


2 479 340 135 




470,162,260 


506 085 245 








3,760,444,963 


2,985 425 380 






Passenger Service: 


9,993,107 
638,557,648 


6,840 116 


Passenger- miles— revenue 


481,453,142 



20 N. C. COKPORATION COMMISSION 

STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— ENTIRE LINE— Continued 



Item 



Amount 



1920 



Revenues and Expenses: 

Freight revenue 

Passenger revenue 

Passenger service train revenue 

Operating revenues 

Operati ng expenses 

Net operating revenues 

Averages per Mile of Road: 

Freight-train miles 

Passenger-train miles 

Mixed- train miles 

Special-train miles 

Transportation service train miles 

Work-train miles 

Locomotive-miles — transportation. 

Freight service car-miles 

Passe nger service car-miles 

Freight revenue 

Passenger service train revenue 

Operating revenues 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenues 

Ton-miles — revenue freight 

Ton-miles — all freight 

Passenger- miles — revenue 

Averages per Train-mile: 

Loaded freight car-miles — freight trains 

Loaded freight car- miles — mixed 

Empty freight car-miles — freight 

Empty freight car-miles — mixed 

Ton-miles — revenue freight 

Ton-miles — all freight 

Passenger train car- mile?— passenger trains 

Passenger train car- miles— mixed trains 

Revenue passenger-miles 

Freight revenue 

Passenger service train revenue 

Opera ti ng revenues 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenues 

Averages per Locomotive-mile 

Train-miles — freight trains 

Car-miles — freight trains 

Train-miles — passenger trains - _. 

Car-miles — passenger trains.. ... 

Train-miles — mi xed trains 

Car-miles — mixed trains 

Train-miles— special trains... 

Car-miles— special trains 



$48,193,386.71 


$44,556,741.27 


19,138,399.42 


16,787,056.28 


23.982,831.31 


20,308,122.59 


$74,121,955.70 


$66,730,767.82 


68,993,862.17 


58.005,832.69 


$ 5,128,093.53 


$ 8,724.935.13 


1,580 


1,368 


1,917 


1,865 


136 


133 


003 


3 


3.636 


3,369 


114 


70 


4,614 


4,127 


55,375 


53,190 


12,691 


12,402 


$ 9,855.98 


$ 9,106.13 


4,904.71 


4,150.40 


15,158.61 


13,637.87 


14,109.87 


11.854.74 


1,048.74 


1,783.13 


672,892 


506,706 


769,045 


610,136 


130,591 


98,395 


22.64 


22.94 


4.54 


5.13 


10.87 


14.15 


1.98 


2.52 


392.18 


343.91 


448.23 


414.11 


6.49 


6.50 


1.75 


2.01 


63.64 


51.99 


5.74 


6.18 


2.39 


2.19 


4.17 


4.05 


3.88 


3.52 


.29 


.53 


.98 


.98 


33.81 


37.25 


.98 


.98 


6.35 


6.37 


.99 


.99 


8.26 


9.65 



10.57 



ATLANTIC COAST LINE EAILKOAD 
STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— ENTIRE UNE-ConMnued 



21 



Item 



Averages per Loaded Freight Car-mile 

Ton-miles — revenue freight 

Ton-miles — all freight 

Freight revenue 

Averages per Car-mile — Passenger: 

Passenger-milcs — revenue 

Passenger revenue 

Miscellaneous Averages: 

Miles hauled — revenue freight 

Miles hauled — nonrevenue freight 

Miles hauled — all freight 

Miles carried— revenue passenger? 

Revenue per ton of freight 

Revenue per ton-mile of freight 

Revenue per passenger 

Revenue per passenger-mile 

Operating ratio 



Amount 



1920 



1921 



18.49 




15.80 


21.13 




19.03 


270.78 


$ 


283.98 


16.14 




12.90 


.48373 


S 


.44972 


189.92 




188.11 


137.46 




145.01 


181.27 




179.09 


63.90 




70.39 


2.78174 


s 


3.38060 


.01465 




.01797 


1.91516 




2.45421 


.02997 




.03487 


93.08 


% 


86.93 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— WITHIN THE STATE 





Item 


Amount 




1920 


1921 


Average mileage of road onerated miles 


1,043.79 


1,042.67 








Locomotive-miles • 

Freight— principal 

Freight — helper 


1,711,728 

5,809 

36,025 


1,412.627 
4,265 


Freight— light 


28,966 








Freight— total 


L 753,562 


1,445,858 








Passenger— principal 

Passenger— helper 

Passenger— light __ 


2,134,059 

8,232 

35,688 


2,004,585 

560 

37,564 


Passenger— total 


2,177,979 


2,042.709 




41,965 

31 

2,201 


36,802 




10 


Mixed train — light 


2 276 










50.197 


39,088 








Special— principal 

Special— helper 


5,292 


6,109 
86 


Special— light 


50 


78 








Special— total 


5,342 


6,273 



22 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATI ONS— WITHI N THE ST ATE— Continued 



Item 



Amount 



1920 



1921 



Locomotive-Miles — Continued 
Train switchiny.- 



Yard switching — freight 

Yard switching — pa^^senger. 



Yard switchi ng — total 

Total transportation service- 
Work service 



Freight Service: 

Tons — revenue freight 

Ton-miles — revenue freight _ 



Passenger Service: 
Passengers carried — revenue. 
Passenger- miles — revenue 



Revenues and Expenses: 

Freight re ven ue 

Passenger revenue 

Passenger service train revenue 



Operating revenue.. 
Operating expenses. 



Net operating revenues. 



Averages per Mile of Road: 
Locomotive-miles— transportation 

Freight revenue 

Passenger service train revenue 

Operati ng revenues 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenues 

Ton-miles — re ve n ue freight 

Passenger- miles — revenue 



Miscellaneous Averages: 

Miles hauled — revenue freight 

Miles carried — revenue passengers . 

Revenue per ton of freight 

Revenue per ton-nrle of freight... 

Revenue per passenger 

Revenue per passenger-mile 

Operating ratio. 



,310 



125,464 



737,517 
96,895 


501,174 
82,860 


834. J 12 


584,034 


4.981,802 


4, 243, 426 


225,205 


85,043 


$ 


6,706,955 
771,295,340 

3.636,753 
160,319,903 

12,472,344.03 
4,708,866.81 
5,765,019.65 


5,342,929 
614,257,760 

2,481,827 
115,301,527 

1 11,468,624.26 
3.984,254.51 
4,748,662.82 


$ 


18,623,234.36 
17,334,790.60 


$ 16,561,435.11 
14,596,265.80 


S 


1,288,443.70 


$ 1,965,169.31 



4,773 
11,949.09 

5,523.16 
17,541.94 
16,507.56 

1,234.39 



153,594 



15.00 
44.03 
1.85961 
.01617 
1.39430 
.02937 
93.03 



4,070 

10,999.28 

4,554.33 

15,883.68 

13.998.93 

1,884.75 

589,120 

110,583 



114.97 
46.46 
2.14651 
.01867 
1.60537 
.03456 
88.13 



ATLANTIC COAST LINE EAILKOAD 



23 



EQUIPMENT OWNED OR LEASED IN SERVICE OF THE COMPANY 
LOCOMOTIVES 





Available for Service Close of Year 1920 


Available for Service Close of Year 1921 


Class of 
•Equipment 


Number 
Fully 
Owned 


Number 
Leased 
and Held 
Under 
Equip- 
ment 
Trust 


Total 
Number 


Tractive 

Power 
.000 Lbs. 


Number 
Fully 
Owned 


Number 
Leased 
and Held 
Under 
Equip- 
ment 
Ttust 


Total 
Number 


Tractive 

Power 
.000 Lbs. 


Steam locomo- 
tives 


787 


140 


927 


23485.5 


798 


105 


903 


23195.6 


Other locomotives 






















Total 


787 


140 


927 


23485.5 


798 


105 


903 


23195.6 







FREIGHT-TRAIN CARS 










Available for Service Close of Year 1920 


Available for Service Close of Year 1921 


Class of 
Equipment 


Number 
Fully 
Owned 


Number 
Leased 

and Held 
Under 
Equip- 
ment 
Trust 


Total 
Number 


Aggre- 
gate 
Capacity 
in Tons 


Number 
Fully 
Owned 


Number 
Leased 
and Held 
Under 
Equip- 
ment 
Trust 


Total 
Number 


Aggre- 
gate 
Capacity 
in Tons 




19,113 

5,598 

241 

679 

293 

898 


2,850 
100 


21,963 

5,698 

241 

679 

293 

1,298 


667,005 

191,590 

9,190 

28,160 

45,428 


20,719 

5,616 

238 

658 

289 

866 


1,450 


22,169 
5,616 

238 
1,058 

289 

1,266 


678,570 


Flat cars 


189 140 


Stock cars 




9,100 






400 


49 320 


Caboose cars _ 






Other freight train 
cars 

All classes of 


400 


400 


43,212 


freight train 
cars 


26,822 


3,350 


30,172 


941,373 


28,386 


2,250 


30,636 


969,342 



PASSENGER-TRAIN CARS 





Available for Service Close of Year 1920 


Available for Service Close of Year 1921 


Class of 
Equipment 


Number 
Fully 
Owned 


Number 
Leased 
and Held 
Under 
Equip- 
ment 
Trust 


Total 
Number 


Aggre- 
gate 
Seating 
Capacity 


Number 
Fully 
Owned 


Number 
Leased 
and Held 
Under 
Equip- 
ment 
Trust 


Total 
Number 


Aggre- 
gate 
Seating 
Capacity 


Coaches 


332 

50 

79 
15 

182 


44 


376 

50 
86 
15 

191 

8 


24,926 
1,446 


353 

51 
86 
15 

191 
8 


25 


378 

51 
86 
15 

191 
8 


25,240 
1,5 8 


Comb, passenger 
cars .... 


Other comb, cars. 


7 

9 
8 


Dimng cars 

Baggage and ex- 
press cars 


704 




704 


Postal cars 




All classes of 










passenger-train 
cars 


658 


68 


726 


27,076 


704 


25 


729 


27,462 



24 



N. C. CORPORATIOX COMMISSION 



EQUIPMENT OWNED OR LEASED IN SERVICE OF THE COMPIKm-Continued 
COMPANY SERVICE EQUIPMENT 





Available for Service Close 
of Year 1920 


Available for Service Close 
of Year 1921 


Class of Equipment 


Number 
Fully 
Owned 


Number 
Leased 

and Held 
Under 
Equip. 
Trust 


Total 
Number 


Number 
Fully 
Owned 


Number 
Leased 
and Held 
Under 
Equip. 
Trust 


Total 
Number 


Officers' and pay cars 

Ballas t cars 

Derrick cars . . 


14 

257 

14 

4 

80 

1,170 




14 

257 

14 

4 

80 

1,170 


,3 

249 

14 

4 

83 

1,156 




13 




249 
14 


Steam shovels 




4 


Wrecking cars 


83 


Other company service cars 






1 156 








All classes of company service cars-. 


1,539 




1,539 


1,519 




1.519 



FLOATING EQUIPMENT 





Available for Service Close 
of Year 1920 


Available for Service Close 
of Year 1921 


Class of Equipment 


Number 
Fully 
Owned 


Number 
Leased 

and Held 
Under 
Equip. 
Trust 


Total 
Number 


Number 
Fully 
Owned 


Number 
Leased 
and Held 
Under 
Equip. 
Trust 


Total 
Number 


Steamboats and tugboat^i 


2 
19 
2 




2 
19 

2 


2 

19 
2 




2 


Barges, car floats, and canal boats 

Other floating equipment 




19 
2 






Total floating equipment 


23 




23 


23 




23 









ATLANTIC COAST LINE RAILKOAD 



25 



» 



TAXES ON RAILWAY PROPERTY 

OTHER THAN U. S. GOVERNMENT TAXES 





1920 


1921 


Name of State 


Amount 

Charged to 

"Railway Tax 

Accruals" in 

Income 


Amount 
Assumed by 
Corporation 


Amount 
Assumed by 
U. S. R. A. 


Amount 

Charged to 

"Railway Tax 

Accruals" in 

Income 




$ 147,689.52 
492,949.92 
622,722.37 
353,538.37 
831,841.30 
338,065.77 
23.90 






S 133,972.37 








443,668.36 








601,585.71 








384,631.36 


Florida 






750,214.08 








137,909.25 


New York, N Y 






27.70 








46.80 











89,040.00 












Total 


S 2,786,831.15 


$2,322,359.29 


$ 464,471.86 


$ 2,451,096.23 



U. S. GOVERNMENT TAXES 





1920 


1921 


Kind of Tax 


Amount 

Charged to 

"Railway Tax 

Accruals" in 

Income 


Amount 
Assumed by 
Corporation 


Amount 
Assumed by 
U. S. R. A. 


Amount 

Charged to 

"Railway Tax 

Accruals" in 

Income 




$ 438,184.51 
66,651.00 






$ 472,671.47 


Capital Stock- . _ _ . . 






61,232.30 










Total U. S. Government Taxes. 


$ 504,«35.51 


$ 420,696.26 


$ 84,139.25 


$ 533,903.77 


Grand Total 


S 3,291,666.66 


$ 2,743,055.55 


$ 548.611.11 





26 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 
EMPLOYEES AND THEIR COMPENSATION 





1920 


1921 


Class of Employees 


Average 
Number of 
Employees 
in Service 


Total 
Compensa- 
tion During 

Year 


Average 
Number of 
Employees 
in Service 


Total 
Compensa- 
tion During 

Year 


General officers, $3,000 per annum and upwards 


65 


$ 398,693.14 


82 


$ 243,432.91 


General officers, below $3,000 per annum 


10 


21.751.36 


5 


4,840.03 


Division off cars, $3,000 per annum and upwards 


103 


446,162.49 


149 


293,237.47 


Division officers, below $3,000 per annum 


148 


309,421.57 


89 


82,305.33 


Clerks, $900 per annum and upwards 


2,748 


4,481,021.71 


2,633 


2,203,489.00 


Messengers and attendants 


268 


245,325.46 


227 


106,120.67 




38 


73,694.63 


34 


38 419 21 


Maintenance of way and structure foremen 


111 


199,181.55 


105 


90,484.89 




633 


935,230.81 


598 


464,579.65 


General foremen— M. E. department 


15 


56,246.65 


11 


20,610.00 


Gang and other foremen— M. E. department 


216 


673,674.27 


210 


334,025.56 


Machinists 


512 


1,199,060.83 


541 


580,333.49 


Boiler makers 


165 


398,426.64 


161 


169,648.21 




108 
15 


244,111.49 
17,840.44 


103 
2"^ 


103,191.57 


Masons and bricklayers 


8 979 19 


Structural ironworkers 


14 


18,839.99 


16 


11 482 23 


Carpenters 


245 


423,124.05 


160 


134 591.81 


Painters and upholsterers 


129 


242,273.07 


115 


97,589.23 


Electricians 


38 

41 

352 

1,116 


93,649.35 

87,771.53 

843,721.04 

2,298,169.19 


38 

34 

283 

830 


45.925.16 


Air-brake men 


31,644.93 


Car inspectors - - 


336,362.45 




749,748.77 


Other skilled laborers 


638 


1,284,702.38 


556 


527,498.03 




1,627 


2,565,477.85 


1,584 


1,078,541.48 


Section men 


3,463 


3,059,925.36 


3,269 


1,047,016.08 


Other unskilled laborers 


2,143 


2,234,267.37 


1,780 


780,511.81 


Foremen of construction gangs and work trains 


15 


31,089.61 


23 


19,981.83 


Other men in construction gangs and work trains 


211 


190,568.39 


194 


69,501.61 




47 


127,683.29 


67 


88,805.81 


Employees in outside agencies 


8 


19,465.24 


19 


13,347.21 


Other traffic employees 


7 


23,715.00 


10 


16,630.00 


Train dispatchers and directors 


87 


265,095.87 


87 


127,575.73 


Telegraphers, telephoners, and block operators 


182 


355,328.58 


201 


188,506.82 


Telegraphers and telephoners operating inter- 










lockers 


100 
40 


183,577.41 
62,633.93 


91 
39 


86,530.67 




32,294.02 




218 


415,886.44 


228 


199,712.44 




• 358 


695,412.16 


348 


331,478.76 




290 


524,259.69 


301 


272,877.47 




8 


17,045.39 


10 


10,046.36 


Station service employees 


2.272 


2,241,404.39 


1,654 


687,912.19 




43 
30 


142,442.75 
94,515.79 


45 

25 


78,540.62 


Yardmaster's assistants (not yard clerks) 


41,855.00 


Yard engineers and motormen 


276 


602,629.17 


241 


267,483.49 


Yard firemen and helpers 


295 


459,202.01 


263 


200,861.93 


Yard conductors (or foremen) 


260 


618,299.94 


231 


267,368.90 


Yard brakemen (switchmen or helpers) 


499 


1,049,570.23 


453 


437,126.69 


Yard switch tenders 


9 
43 


9,763.53 
57,695.45 


7 
41 


5,343.66 




29,060.07 


Hostlers 


151 

886 


322,000.76 
1,233,212.18 


147 

802 


146,186.68 




487,496.83 


Road freight engineers and motormen 


366 


1,226,129.28 


344 


529,991.84 




398 


865,950.85 


386 


372,773.20 


Road freight conductors 


338 


1,062,605.64 


321 


473,783.87 



ATLANTIC COAST LINE EAILKOAD 27 

EMPLOYEES AND THEIR COM PENSATION— Conhnued 



Class of Employees 



Road freight brakemen and flagmen 

Road passenger engineers and motormen 

Road passenger firemen and helpers 

Road passenger conductors 

Road passenger baggagemen 

Road passenger brakemen and flagmen.. 

Other road train employees 

Crossing flagmen and gatemen 

Drawbridge operators 

Floating equipment employees 

Policemen and watchmen 

Other transportation employees 

All other employees 

Total 



1920 



Average 
Number of 
Employees 
in Service 



190 

205 

151 

115 

118 

110 

162 

54 

18 

130 

9 

442 



24,990 



Total 
Compensa- 
tion During 

Year 



$1,930 
678 
511 
482 
259 
296 
138 
156 
51, 
34, 
215, 
15, 
504, 



,682.38 
,485.66 
,665.67 
,367.33 
,893.06 
,747.80 
,772.65 
,710.77 
,232.74 
009.12 
265.04 
164.91 
094.94 



$41,024,039.94 



1921 



Average 
Number of 
Employees 
in Service 



757 
216 
229 
158 
128 
146 

72 
149 

49 

18 
121 

10 
421 



22,687 



Total 
Compensa- 
tion During 

Year 



798 

351 

271 

259 

140 

168 

42 

82, 

23 

17 

107 

8 

239 



,043.20 
,726.46 
,321.52 
,003.88 
,927.63 
,111.96 
,295.82 
,581.68 
,351.74 
,742.41 
,509.66 
,278.02 
,832.20 



117,578,469.04 



28 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



NORFOLK SOUTHERN RAILROAD COMPANY 



PRINCIPAL GENERAL OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




George R. Loyall 

Ernest Williams 

E. D. Kyle 

M. S. Hawkins 

J. F. George 

W. B. Rodman 

J C. Nelms, Jr 


Norfolk, Va 


Vice-President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 


Lynchburg, Va. 
Norfolk, Va. 
Norfolk Va 


Treasurer 


Norfolk Va 


General Counsel. 
General Auditor ._ 




Norfolk, Va. 
Norfolk, Va. 


General Manager 


J. F. Pelter 

F. L. Nicholson 

A. C. Adams 


Norfolk Va 


Chief Engineer 

Mechanical Superi 


ntendent-.- 


Norfolk, Va. 
Norfolk, Va 



DIRECTORS 

Philip Allen, Providence, R. I.; Frederic Bull, New York, N. Y.; G. E Christie, New York, N. Y.; 
Lewis L. Clarke, New York, N. Y.; C. M. Carr, Durham, N C; C. E( Foy, New Bern, N. C; Harold 
J. Gross, Providence, R. I.; E. C. Granbury, New York, N.Y.; T. T. Harkrader, New York, N. Y.; 
George W. Hill, New York, N. Y.; Alvin W. Kuch, New York, N. Y.; Luke V. Lockwood, New York, 
N.Y.; George A. Loyall, Norfolk, Va.; C. J. Millard, Norfolk, Va.; S. M. Nicholson, Providence, R. I.; 
Marsden J( Perry, New York, N. Y.; R. H. Swartwout, New York, N. Y.; John T. Terry, New York, 
N. Y.; Ernest Wilhamo, Lynchburg, Va.; R. B. Wilhams, Jr., New York, N. Y. 



HISTORY 

1. Exact name of common carrier making this report: Norfolk Southern Railroad Company. 

2. Date of organization: April 30, 1910. (Charter filed May 2, 1910.) 

3. Under laws of what Government, State, or Territory organized? If more than one, name all. 
Give specific reference to each statute and all amendments thereof: 

Virginia, pursuant to provisions of an act of the General Assembly of Virginia entitled, "An Act 
Concerning Corporations," which became a law the 21st day of May, 1903, and amendments thereto. 

4. If a consolidated or merging company, name all constituent and all merged companies. Give 
specific reference to charters or general laws governing organization of each, and all amendments of 
same: 

NORFOLK AND SOUTHERN RAILROAD COMPANY 

Organized June 1, 1891, under North Carolina General Law; certificates filed May, 1891. Norfolk 
and Southern Railroad Company, Albemarle and Pantego Railroad Company, and Elizabeth City 
and Norfolk Railroad Company. Charter granted by State of North Carolina Jan. 20, 1870, amended 
January 24, 1874, March 7, 1878, January 20, 1883, January 31, 1883. Ratified by State of Virginia, 
February 23. 1875, March 3, 1882, March 6, 1882, February 3, 1888. Amended in State of North CaroUna 
March 2, 1889, March 11, 1889, March 10, 1891. Albemarle and Pantego Railroad Company charter 
granted by North Carolina March 2, 1891. Authorized by resolutions of respective boards of directors 
June 1, 1891, and authorized by General Law of North Carolina, being noncompetitive roads. 

MERGER OF NORFOLK AND SOUTHERN RAILROAD COMPANY AND ALBEMARLE AND 
PANTEGO RAILROAD COMPANY 

Norfolk and Southern Railroad Company foreclosed by sale April 1, 1891. Organized January 
20, 1870, as the Elizabeth City and Norfolk Railroad Company. Name changed by legislative enact- 
ment January 31, 1883, to Norfolk Southern Railroad Company. 

The Norfolk, Virginia Beach and Southern Railroad was purchased by this company on Novem- 
ber 1, 1899, and merged into it. The Wa..hington and Plymouth Railroad was purchased by this com- 
pany on January 15, 1904, operated until March 31, 1904, as an independent line, and merged into this 
company on April 1, 1904. On December 12, 1904, Chesapeake Transit Company, and electric line 
operated between Norfolk and Virginia Beach (23.55 miles) was acquired and merged with this company. 

VIRGINIA AND CAROLINA COAST RAILROAD COMPANY 

Organized June 30, 1905, under an act of the General Assembly, State of Virginia, entitled ".An Act 
Governing Corporations," which became a law on the 21st day of May, 1903. 



NORFOLK SOUTHERN RAILROAD 29 

Suffolk and Carolina Railway Company organized under the laws of the States of Virginia and 
North Carolina, February 26, 1874, by virtue of authority of act of the General Assembly, State of 
Virginia, session 1872-1873, chapter 185, approved March 19, 1873, incorporating Nansemond Land, 
Lumber and Narrow Gauge Railway Company, session 1883-1884, page 236, chapter 192,. approved 
February 26, 1884; amended and reenacted the above act, changing the corporate name to the Suffolk 
and Carolina Railway Company; session 1885-1886, page 109, chapter 114, approved February 12, 1886, 
amended and reenacts the charter of the Suffolk and Carolina Railway Company. 

Incorporated under the laws of the State of North Carolina, September 24, 1884, session 1887, chap- 
ter 94, page 181; confirms and continues the charter and franchises and corporate privileges and grants 
additional power, etc., session 1889, chapter 272, page 277, grants additional powers, etc. 

Carolina Coast Railroad Company, incorporated under authority chapter 49, of Code of North 
Carolina and ratified by the General Assembly of State of North Carolina March 5, 1903. Merged 
January 27, 1906, under authority conferred by an act of General Assembly of the State of Virginia, 
which became a law on the 21st day of May, 1903, under which law this company was organized and 
an agreement of merger between the stockholders of the Virginia and Carolina Coast Railroad Com- 
pany and Suffolk and Carolina Railway Company and Carolina Coast Railroad Company, dated 
January 10, 1906, and in conformity to an instrument dated January 27, 1906, authorizing said merger 
by the State of Virginia. 

ATLANTIC AND NORTH CAROLINA COMPANY 

Organized May 19, 1903, as Howland Improvement Company, chartered by Private Laws of North 
Carolina, 1903, chapter 271. Amended Laws 1905, Private, chapter 86, ratified February 15, 1905. 
All amendments thereof, North Carolina. 

PAMLICO. ORIENTAL AND WESTERN RAILROAD COMPANY 

Organized March 9, 1891, under Laws of the State of North Carolina, chapter 461, Laws of 1891. 
Amended January 27, 1902. 

November 28, 1906, the Norfolk and Southern Railroad, the Virginia and Carolina Coast Rail- 
road, the Raleigh and Pamlico Sound Railroad, and the Atlantic and North Carolina Railroad Com- 
pany consolidated into one corporation, entitled the Norfolk and Southern Railway Company, as 
per agreement of consoHdation dated October 29, 1906, filed in the office of the Secretary of State of 
North Carolina and in the office of the Corporation Commission of Virginia. 

RALEIGH. CHARLOTTE AND SOUTHERN RAILWAY COMPANY 

Organized October 3, 1911 (charter ratified by General Assembly of North Carolina, March 7, 1911) 
under an act of the General Assembly of the State of North Carolina entitled "An Act to Incorporate 
the Raleigh, Charlotte and Southern Railway Company." 

This company consolidated with the Raleigh and Southport Railway Company, Durham and 
Charlotte Railroad Company, Sanford and Troy Railroad, and Aberdeen and Asheboro Railroad 
Company. The Raleigh and Southport Railway Company received its charter under chapter 304 
of the Private Laws of North CaroHna of the year 1905. The Durham and Charlotte Railroad Company 
received its charter under chapter 158 of the Private Laws of North Carolina of the session of 1893. The 
Sanford and Troy Railroad received its charter under the General Laws of the State of North Carolina 
of 1909. The Aberdeen and Asheboro Railroad Company received its charter under chapter 415 of 
the Private Laws of the State of North Carolina, session 1907, under an act to consolidate the Aberdeen 
and West End Railroad Company, the Aberdeen and Montgomery Railroad Company, and the 
Jackson Springs Railroad Company. This charter was amended by chapter 148 of the session of 1909 
under an act to amend charter of the Aberdeen and Asheboro Railroad. 

All the above consolidations were made by agreement dated February 1, 1912, by authority of the 
stockholders. 

The Raleigh, Charlotte and Southern Railway Company was merged with the Norfolk Southern 
Railroad Company, January 1, 1914. 



30 



N. C. COKPORATIOX COMMISSION 



COMPARATIVE GENERAL BALANCE SHEET— ASSET SIDE 



Balance at 

Beginning of 

Year 1920 


Item 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1920 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1921 


$ 30,779,491.88 


Investments: 


$ 31,322,895.22 
143,948.49 
378,284.42 
140,085.19 
251,099.22 

180,909.39 

2,833,600.00 

81,750.00 

4,413.49 

254,827.29 
20,000.00 
80,000.00 


$ 31,790,861.02 


185,252.31 




144,780.44 


5 391.06 


Sinking funds 


267 320 75 


133,450.73 
249,952.80 


Deposits in lieu of mortgaged property sold . 

Miscellaneous physical property 


104.973.49 
253 956 18 


180,909.39 

3,206,600.00 

81,750.00 

3,338.49 

254 827.29 


Investments in Affiliated Companies: 

Stocks 

Bonds 

Notes - 

Advances 

Other Investments: 
Stocks 


180,909.39 

2,700,800.00 

81,750.00 

4,110.14 

253 211 62 


20 000.00 


Bonds 


20 000 00 




Miscellaneous 


80 000.00 




Total investments 




$ 35,050,963.95 


$ 35,691,812.71. 


$ 35,882,678.03 




Current Assets: 
Cash - 




$ 36,817.25 


$ 279,974.37 

67,880.00 

503,890.85 


$ 84,577.42 


154,345.00 




54,750.00 


513,279.05 




487.189.51 


33,891.06 




41,538.00 


54,468.58 


Net balance receivable from agents and conductors 


122,517.99 

808,556.19 

796,233.29 

11,046.23 

15,807.10 


109,487.35 
220.509.22 




Material and supplies 


453,717.73 


15 655 71 


Interest and dividends receivab'e 


16,509.34 




Rents receivable 




808 456.65 


Other current assets 






Total current assets 








S 2,605,906.02 


$ 2,198,278.57 




Deferred Assets: 




$ 3,630.07 


1 55,215.61 
1,604,663.47 


1 57,370.51 


2,245,880.99 




1,644,661.09 




Total deferred assets 




1 2 249 511 06 


$ 1,659,879.08 


1 1,702.031.60 




Unadjusted Debits: 

Rents and insurance premiums paid in advance., - 
Di. count on funded debt 




1 969 480 11 


$ 19,634.96 
940,860.46 
220,735.18 


1 4,251.52 
916,140.93 


37 769 93 


Other unadjusted debits 


303.811.13 




Total unadjusted debits 

Grand total 




$ 1,007,250.04 


1 1,181,230.60 


$ 1,224,203.58 


? 39 116 181.70 


$ 41,138,828.41 


$ 41,007,191.78 









XORFOLK SOUTHEEN RAILROAD 



31 



COMPARATIVE GENERAL BALANCE SHEET— LI ABI LITY SIDE 



Balance at 

Beginning of 

Year 1920 



Item 



Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1920 



Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1921 



? 16,000,000.00 



16,000,000.00 



? 17,420,600.00 



$ 17,420,600.00 



569,784.10 

14,535.82 

3,321.91 

312.60 

74,920.00 

10.00 

302,083.53 

187.50 



965,155.46 



$ 1,480,870.28 



$ 1,480,870.28 



26,505.86 
10,816.31 
10,755.99 
627,936.65 
32,297.44 



$ 708,312.25 



I 2,541,243.71 



$ 2,541,243.71 



"$ 39,116,181.70 



Stock: 
Capital stock_ 



Total stock 



Long-Term Debt- 
Funded debt unmatured. 

Total long-term debt.. 



CuRRENT Liabilities: 

Loans and b lis payable 

Traffic and car-service balances payable. 

Audited accounts and wages payable 

Miscellaneous accounts payable 

Interest matured unpaid 

Dividends matured unpaid 

Unmatured interest accrued 

Unmatured rents accrued 



Total current liabi'it' 



Deferred Liabilities: 
Other deferred liabilities . 



Total deferred Labilities. 



Unad.justed Credits: 
Tax liability 

Operating reserves 

Accrued depreciation — Road 

Accrued depreciation — Equipment- 
Other unadjusted credits 



Total unadjusted credits 



Corporate Surplus: 

Additions to property through 'ncome and 
surplus 



Total appropriated surplu.s --. 
Profit and Loss, Credit balance. 

Total corporate surplus 

Grand total 



$ 16,000,000.00 



I 16,000,000.00 



$ 16,000,000.00 



$ 16,000,000.00 



S 17,446,200.00 



.1 17,202,600.00 



I 17,446,200.00 



$ 17,202,600.00 



279,481.77 

113,123.80 

938,471.23 

369.35 

60,805.00 

10.00 

310,970.78 

14,837.51 



278,513.27 

267,946.86 

786,711.52 

27.362.32 

54,825.00 

10.00 

318,424.60 

8,312.47 



S 1,718,( 



.44 



1,742,106.04 



$ 2,146,920.92 
I 2,146,920.92 



I 2,258,127.43 
$ 2,258,127.43 



S 928.94 

37,422.43 

10,7.55.99 

735,328.71 

281,790.62 



63,881.37 



10,755.99 
840,409.98 
137.619.28 



$ 1,066,226.09 



1,052,666.62 



17,792.08 



17,792.08 



I 2,761,411. 



$ 2,733,899.61 



$ 2,761,411. 



$ 2,751,691. 



I 41,138,828.41 



$ 41,007,191.78 



32 



N. C. CORPORATIOISr COMMISSION 







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34 



N. C. OOKPORATION COMMISSION 



RAILWAY OPERATING REVENUES-ENTIRE LINE 





1920 


1921 


Class of Railway Operating Revenues 


Total 

Amount of 

Revenue for 

the Year 


Comparison 

With Total 

Revenue of 

Preceding 

Year 

Increase 


Total 

Amount of 

Revenue for 

the Year 


Comparison 
With Total 
Revenue of 
Preceding 

Year 
Increase 


Freight 


15,144,272.74 

2,027,925.72 

7,873.73 

212,439.17 

151,941.13 

6,220.71 

872.16 

48,787.15 

12,374.06 

168.98 


S 825,327 50 

155,860.10 

*623.90 

136,889.52 

*3 529.49 


15,946,351.56 

1,632,955.49 

9,611.64 

110,290.40 

1SQ fi84 RF, 


S 802,078.82 
*394,970.23 




1,737.91 


Mail 


*102,148.77 


Express 


*r^ 256 78 


Other passenger-train 


662.91 1 6 602 31 


381.60 


Milk 


*129,89 

2,788.19 

2.894.93 

33.98 


1,055.87 
46,977.12 
10,955.68 

5,756.-54 


1«3.71 


Switching 


1.810.03 


Special service train 

Water transfers — Freight 


1,418.38 
5,587.56 






Total rail-line transportation revenue 


17,612,875.55 


11,120,173.85 


$7,910,240.96 


$ 297,365.41 


Station, train, and boat privileges 


$ 7,087.39 

129.70 

31,625.17 

112.86 

50,082.29 

6,853.66 

10,092.51 

16,399.49 

8,808.36 


$ 473.16 

*95.50 

13,808.66 

14.18 

16.652.68 

1,666.12 

*838.18 

3,854.90 

2,387.11 


$ 7,489.81 

92.80 

46.281.41 

182.47 

34,304.32 

6,401.48 

16,243.47 

18,806.82 

9,673.89 


$ 402.42 
36.90 




14,656.24 




69.61 


Demurrage 

Telegraph and telephone 

Power 

Rents of buildings and other property 

Miscellaneous 


*15. 777.97 

*452.18 

6,150.96 

2,407.33 

865.53 






Total incidental operating revenue 


$ 131,191.43 


$ 37,923.13 


$ 139,476.47 


$ 8,285.04 


Joint f acili ty— Cr 


$ 6,850.48 
91.38 


$ 1,519.34 
17.33 


$ 7,167.44 
89.93 


$ 316.96 
1.45 






Total joint facility operating revenue 


$ 6,759.10 


$ 1,502.01 


$ 7,077.51 


1 318.41 


Total railway operating revenues 


$7,750,826.08 


11,159,598.99 


$8,056,794.94 


$ 305,968.86 



Decrease. 



NORFOLK SOUTHERN RAILROAD 



RAILWAY OPERATING REVENUES-WITHIN THE STATE 



Class of Railway Operating Revenues 



1920 
Total Intra- 
state and 
Interstate 
Traffic 



1921 
Total Intra- 
state and 
Interstate 
Traffic 



Freight 

Passenger 

Excess baggage 

Mail 

E xpress 

Other passenger-trai n 

Milk 

Switching 

Special service train 

Total rail-line transportation revenue 

Station, train, and boat privileges 

Parcel room 

Storage — Freight 

Storage — Baggage 

Demurrage 

Telegraph and telephone 

Rents of buildings and other property . 
Miscellaneous i 

Total incidental operating revenue... 

Joint facility — Cr 

Joint facility — Dr. . 

Total joint facility operating revenue 

Total railway operating revenues... 



4,528,503.29 

1,785,183.01 

6,931.25 

187,010.20 

133,753.78 

5,476.09 

767.76 

42,947.33 

10,892.89 



5,284,502.91 

1,274,841.57 

8,812.53 

100,917.85 

126,053.50 

5,108.44 

198.84 

4,421.12 

6,871.26 



f 


6,701,465.60 








% 


6,239.03 


% 


6,005.17 




114.17 




92.80 




27,839.64 




44,377.24 




99.35 




181.83 




44,087.44 




28,650.86 




6,033.28 




5,655.85 




14,436.47 




17,241.07 




7,754.00 




8,843.97 


% 


106,603.38 


% 


% 


6,030.48 


% 


6,604.08 




80.44 




82.86 


% 


5,950.04 


% 



% 6,814,019.02 



I 6,929,298.03 



36 



X. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 
RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES— ENTI RE LINE 



Name of Railway Operating Expense Account 



Amount of Operating 
Expenses for the Year 



1920 



Maintenance of Way and Structures: 

Superintendence 

Roadway maintenance — Yard 

Roadway maintenance — Other 

Bridges, trestles, and culverts — Other... 

Ties— Yard 

Ties— Other 

Rails — Yard 

Rails— Other 

Other track material — Other 

Ballast— Other 

Track laying and surfacing — ^Yard 

Track laying and surfacing — Other 

Right-of-way fences — Other 

Crossings and signs — Yard ... 

Crossings and signs — Other 

Station and office buildings 

Roadway buildings 

Water stations 

Fuel st ati ons 

Shops and enginehouses 

Wharves and docks 

Telegraph and telephone lines 

Signals and interlockers 

Power substation buildings 

Power transmission systems 

Power distribution systems 

Power line poles and fixtures 

Paving 

Roadway machines 

Small tools and supplies 

Removing snow, ice, and sand 

Injuries to persons 

Insurance 

Stationery and printing 

Other expenses 



74,983.04 
148,504.15 



295,559.31 



327,441.21 



5,018.17 
2,316.38 
3,220.05 



501,204.43 
2,438.48 



Total of Accounts 



Maintaining joint tracks, yards, and other facilities — Dr. 
Maintaining joint tracks, yards, and other facilities — Cr.. 

Total maintenance of way ajjd structures 



Maintenance of Equipment: 

Superintendence 

Shop machinery 

Power plant machinery 

Power substation apparatus 

Steam locomotives — Repairs 

Steam locomotives — Depreciation. 

Other locomotives — Repairs 

Other locomotives — Depreciation.. 

Freight-train cars — Repairs 

Freight-train cars — Depreciation . . 



12,981.68 

53,699.81 

7,226.92 

23,089.97 

9,408.58 

13,809.69 

12,460.54 

20,330.24 

542.01 

28.36 

3,472.11 

4,724.13 

1,166.36 

807.67 

18,669.37 

23,484.51 

780.37 

5,417.31 

13,672.00 

2,460.02 

115.00 



68,632.14 

142.29 

73,819.93 

250,958.97 

28,079.80 

302,285.78 

2,099.73 

2,572.59 

31,940.94 

59.85 

11,458.89 

267,833.15 

1,319.65 

85.92 

9,522.62 

21,110.36 

3,600.26 

22,686.32 

6,907.08 

3,293.52 

12,534.28 

24,311.57 

399.65 



535. 12 

7,370.49 

1,923.69 

25.44 

9,839.35 

15,198.51 

1,740.26 

9,690.15 

13,917.09 

2,113.83 

5.45 



$ 


1,589,031.87 


$ 


1,208,014.67 


$ 


17,007.54 
357.80 


$ 


20,814.17 
511.09 


1 


1,605,681.61 


$ 


1,228,317.75 



86,559.37 

34,919.64 

16,898.32 

1,622.24 

551,469.37 

24,516.57 

7,257.05 

294. 12 

618,701.27 

64,612.97 



82 
10 
2 

456 

27 
7 

330 
71 



,342.79 
,974.96 
,335.80 

921.40 
,764.76 
,437.60 
,671.64 

294.12 
,079.37 
.105.61 



NORFOLK SOUTHERN RAILROAD 



37 



RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES— ENTIRE L\NE-Continued 



Name of Railway Operating Expense Account 



Maintenance of Equipment — Continued 

Freight-train cars— Retirements 

Passenger-train cars — Repairs 

Passenger-train cars— Depreciation 

Passenger-train cars — Retirements 

Motor equipment of cars — Repairs 

Motor equipment of cars — Depreciation. 

Floating equipment — Repairs 

Floating equipment — Depreciation 

Work equipment — Repairs 

Work equipment — Depreciation 

Injuries to persons 

Insurance 

Stationery and printing 

Other expenses 



Total 

Maintaining joint equipment at terminals — Dr. 

Total maintenance of equipment 



Traffic: 

Superintendence 

Outside agencies 

Advertising _■*_ 

Traffic associations 

Insurance 

Stationery and printing. 
Other expenses 



Total. 



Transportation— Rail Line: 

Superintendence 

Dispatching trains 

Station employees 

Weighing, inspection, and demurrage bureaus. 

Station supplies and expenses 

Yardmasters and yard clerks 

Yard conductors and brakemen 

Yard switch and signal tenders 

Yard enginemen 

Yard motormen 

Fuel for yard locomotives 

Water for yard locomotives 

Lubricants for yard locomotives 

Other supplies for yard locomotives 

Enginehouse expenses — Yard 

Yard supplies and expenses 

Train enginemen 

Train motormen 

Fuel for train locomotives 

Train power produced 

Train power purchased 

Water for train locomotives 



Amount of Operating 
Expenses for the Year 



1,126.90 
193,925.34 

8,611.15 

2,772.17 
16,335.17 

1,351.38 
51,708.87 

4,869.36 
40,001.22 

3,505.36 

7,463.63 
11,169.00 

1,977.96 
533.11 



$ 1,749,947.74 
174.22 



$ 1,750,121.96 



$ 72,767.45 

72,606.41 
2,259.13 
10,386.94 



40,328.91 
1,127.51 



199,476.35 



153,662. 

38,184. 

829,962. 

7.863. 

38.000. 

23,884. 

132,066. 

2,866. 

88.051. 

4,639. 

131,600. 

1.523. 

707. 

586. 

15,703. 

789. 

371,229. 

29,898. 

923,888. 

95,191. 



1921 



414.52 

129,471.45 

8,655.18 

872.00 

6,480.81 

1,352.16 

14,534.97 

4,869.3e 

12,806.71 

3,595.92 

2,622.61 

42,331.07 

1,639.38 

802.02 



1,213,131.57 



$ 1,213,131.57 



92,496.45 

127,834.11 

3,730.73 

4,458.19 

11.25 

37,601.12 

806.94 



265,324.91 



39,571.90 



137,116.13 

36,805.89 

633,846.17 

8,642.87 

26,585.41 

21,747.18 

112,656.59 

1,309.81 

81,459.18 

3,299.89 

104.213.02 

2,242.88 

1,009.05 

424.41 

19,798.24 

699.71. 

350,019.69 

31,634.88 

802,247.70 

95,397.22 

120.72 

34,777.50 



38 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES— ENTIRE UHE— Continued 



Name of Railway Operating Expense Account 



Transportation — Rail Line — Continued 

Lubricants for train locomotives, 

Other supplies for train locomotives 

Enginehouse expenses — Train 

Trainmen 

Train supplies and expenses 

Operating sleeping cars •_ 

Signal and interlocker operation 

Crossing protection 

Drawbridge operation 

Telegraph and telephone operation 

Operating floating equipment 

Stationery and printing 

Other expenses 

Insurance 

Clearing wrecks 

Damage to property 

Damage to live stock on right of way... 

Loss and damage — Freight 

Loss and damage — Baggage 

Injuries to persons 



Total 

Operating joint yards and terminals — Dr. 
Operating joint yards and terminals — Cr. 
Operating joint tracks and facilities — Dr.. 
Operating joint tracks and facilities — Cr.. 



Total transportation — Rail line. 

Miscellaneous Operations: 
Producing power sold 



Total miscellaneous operations. 



General: 

Salaries and expenses of general officers 

Salaries and expenses of clferks and attendants. 

General office supplies and expenses 

Law expenses 

Insurance 

Pensions . 

Stationery and printing 

Valuation expenses 

Other expenses 



Total 

General joint facilities— Dr. 



Total general expenses 

Grand total railway operating expenses- 



Amount of Operating 
Expenses for the Year 



11,675.82 

8.278.80 

115,749.90 

526,082.94 

102,815.61 



18,743.19 

23,706.92 

23,631.86 

.39 

46,152.85 

47,068.15 

7,739.54 

5,813.82 

32,954.33 

54,435.12 

31,281.88 

155,435.37 

399.89 

79,729.50 



4,221,568.44 
97,228.78 
10,337.40 
20,672.69 
2,360.75 



$ 4,326,801.76 



3.018.67 



3,018.67 



79,642.93 
201,785.97 

15,219.31 

45,090.23 
3,034.30 
1,830.00 

19,868.68 
3,864.75 

16,168.95 



$ 386,505.12 
2,473.85 



$ 388,978.97 



$ 8,274,079.32 



11,630.79 

6,196.95 

84,018.22 

475,544.20 

88,701.11 

13.92 

18,744.61 

22,629.41 

20,435.46 

113.49 

34,693.52 

43,911.61 

1,349.63 

9,478.05 

29,553.22 

34,276.66 

20,693.05 

136,269.84 

510.74 

7,541.04 



3,537,277.58 

100,667.92 

9,405.99 

25,243.42 



3,653,782.93 



5,352.16 



5,352.16 



78,153.65 

202,984.88 

16,410.81 

42,448.73 

1,165.59 

1,368.75 

17,648.76 

10,254.91 

14,281.09 



$ 384,717.17 

1,882.12 



386,599.29 



$ 6,752,508.61 



Operating ratio (ratio of operating expenses to operating revenues), 1920,106.75 per cent; 1921, 83.81 
per cent. 



NORFOLK SOUTHERN RAILROAD 
RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES-WITHI N THE STATE 



;}9 



Name of Railway Operating Expense Account 



Maintenance of Way and Structures: 

Superintendence 

Roadway maintenance — Yard 

Roadway maintenance — Other 

Bridges, trestles, and culverts — Other 

Ties— Yard 

Ties— Other 

Rails — Yard 

Rails— Other 

Other track material— Other 

Ballast— Other 

Track laying and surfacing— Yard 

Track laying and surfacing— Other 

Right-of-way fences— Other '. 

Crossings and signs — Yard 

Crossings and signs — Other 

Station and office buildings 

Roadway buildings 

Water stations 

Fuel stations 

Shops and enginehouses 

Wharves and docks i 

Telegraph and telephone lines 

Signals and interlockers 

Pavi ng 

Roadway machines 

Small tools and supplies 

Removing snow, ice, and sand 

Injuries to persons 

Insurance 

Stationery and printing 

Other expenses 



Total- 



Maintaining joint tracks, yards, and other facilities— Dr. 
Maintaining joint tracks, yards, and other facihties— Cr.. 



Total maintenance of way and structures- 



Maintenance of Equipment: 

Superintendence 

Shop machinery 

Steam locomotives — Repairs 

Steam locomotives— Depreciation 

Other locomotives — Repairs 

Freight-train cars- Repairs 

Freight-train cars— Depreciation 

- Freight-train cars— Retirements 

Passenger-train cars — Repairs 

Passenger-train cars — Depreciation 

Passenger-train cars — Retirements 

Motor equipment of cars — Repairs 

Motor equipment of cars — Depreciation. 
Floating equipment— Repairs 



Amount of Operating 
Expenses for the Year 



1920 



66,007.57 



130,728.20 
260,180.87 



288,246.50 



4,417.50 
2,039.11 
2,834.61 



441,210.26 
2,146.59 



11,427.78 

47,271.95 

6,361.86 

20,326.10 

8,282.37 

12,156.67 

10,969.02 

17,896.71 

477.13 

710.99 

16,434.65 

20,673.42 

686.96 

4,768.86 

12,035.46 

2,165.56 

101.24 



76,198.21 

30,739.76 

485,458.49 

21,581.94 



544,642.73 

56,878.80 

992.01 

170,712.48 

7,580.40 

2,440.34 



1921 



58,994.77 

131.86 

65,800.05 

223,761.85 

27,481.05 

268,014.17 

1,911.95 

2,346.30 

28,573.28 

55.14 

10,080.43 

235,783.78 

1,174.46 

85.92 

8,331.97 

17,159.54 

3,211.15 

19,718.72 

6,364.18 

3,034.65 

11,549.08 

21,544.58 

368.24 



9,017.58 
13,642.43 

1,536.57 

8,562.58 
12,823.21 

1,946.27 
5.02 



$ 1,390,557.94 


$ 1,063,010.78 


$ 14,971.74 
314.97 


$ 16,335.21 
470.92 


$ 1,405,214.71 


$ 1,078,875.07 



70,942.63 

10,111.94 

426,709.64 

25,632.20 

2,075.17 

308,247.70 

66,370.42 

387.24 

97,202.04 

6,208.26 

814.62 

51.68 

385.30 

13,578.57 



40 N. C. COBPOBATIOX COMMISSION 

RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES-WITHI N THE ST AT E-Continued 



Name of Railway Operating Expense Account 



Amount of Operating 
Expenses for the Year 



1920 



1921 



Maintenance of Equipment — Continued 

Floating equipment — Depreciation 

Work equipment — Repairs 

Work equipment — Depreciation 

Injuries to persons 

Insurance 

Stationery and printing 

Other expenses 



Total 

Maintaining joint equipment at terminals — Dr. 

Total maintenance of equipment 



Traffic: 

Superintendence 

Outside agencies 

Advertising 

Traffic associations 

Insurance 

Stationery and printing. 
Other expenses 



Total. 



Transportation— Rail Line: 

Superintendence 

Dispatching trains 

Station employees 

Weighing, inspection, and demurrage bureaus. 

Station supplies and expenses 

Yardmasters and yard clerks 

Yard conductors and brakemen 

Yard switch and signal tenders 

Yard enginemen 

Yard motormen 

Fuel for yard locomotives 

Water for yard locomotives 

Lubricants for yard locomotives 

Other supplies for yard locomotives 

Enginehouse expenses — Yard 

Yard supplies and expenses 

Train enginemen 

Train motormen 

Fuel for train locomotives 

Water for train locomotives 

Lubricants for train locomotives 

Other supplies for train locomotives 

E ngi nehouse expenses — Trai n 

Trainmen 

Train supplies and expenses 

Operating sleeping cars 

Signal and interlocker operation 

Cr ossi ng pr otecti on 

I^rawbridge operation 



35,213.07 
3,085.77 
6,570.23 
9,832.07 
1,741.20 
469.30 



1,452,152.78 
153.37 



S 4,548.96 

11,964.03 
3,350.90 
2,420.15 
39,. 545. 69 
1,. 528. 82 
752.11 

% 1,090.424.35 



$ 1,452,306.15 



% 1,090,424.35 



$ 64,057.19 

63,915.43 

1,988.71 

9,143.62 



35,501.54 
992.55 



$ 175,599.04 



135,269.27 
33,614.10 
730,615.75 
921.87 
33,451.97 
21,025.21 
116,258.21 
2,523.25 
77,511.50 



115,847.58 

1,341.06 

622.92 

516.66 

13,823.98 

695.23 

326,793.37 



813,299.35 

34,835.15 

10,278.23 

7,287.83 

101,894.64 

463,1*10.81 

90,508.58 



16,499.63 
20.869.20 
20,803.13 



81,413.84 

112,608.17 

2,478.42 

3,946.67 

10.36 

33,368.59 

745.68 



233,080.37 



118,083.87 

26,248.85 

560,015.83 

7,675.88 

23,319.20 

20,037.85 

100,727.98 

838.00 

73,975.32 

2,868.17 

95,916.92 

2,066.59 

929.74 

391.05 

18,242.10 

644.71 

322,323.59 

138.65 

739,086.63 

32,043.99 

10,732.50 

5.715.40 

77,219.19 

396,633.59 

74,871.01 

12.83 

16,052.99 

18,428.53 

17,722.00 



NORFOLK SOUTHERN RAILROAD 
RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES— WITHIN THE ST AT E— Continued 



41 



Name of Railway Operating Expense Account 



Amount of Operating 
Expenses for the Year 



1920 



1921 



Transportation — Rail Line — Continued 

Telegraph and telephone operation 

Operating floating equipment 

Stationery and printing 

Other expenses 

Insurance 

Clearing wrecks 

Damage to property 

Damage to live stock on right of way... 

Loss and damage — Freight 

Loss and damage — Baggage 

Injuries to persons 



Total. 



Operating joint yards and terminals — Dr. 
Operating joint yards and terminals — Cr. 
Operating joint tracks and facilities — Dr. . 
Operating joint tracks and facilities — Cr. . 

Total transportation — Rail line 



General: 

Salaries and expenses of general officers 

Salaries and expenses of clerks and attendants. 

General office supplies and expenses 

Law expenses 

Insurance 

Pensions 

Stationery and printing 

Valuation expenses 

Other expenses 



Total 

General joint facilities — Dr. 



Total general expenses 

Grand total railway operating expenses- 



.39 



41,434.09 

6,813.12 

5,117.91 

29,009.70 

47,919.24 

27,537.44 

136,829.76 

352.02 

70,185.88 



30.07 

31,966.61 

35.778.68 

1,241.53 

8.673.53 

26,802.03 

31,347.17 

18,803.39 

23,285.46 

463.69 

11,785.25 



$ 3,561,418.03 



$ 3,029,569.87 



85,590.50 
9,073.60 

18,198.17 
2,078.17 



$ 71.902.70 

8.666.68 

23,259.29 



$ 3,654,054.93 



$ 3,116,065.18 



70,109.67 
177,632.19 

13,397.56 

39,692.93 
2,671.09 
1,610.95 

17,490.40 
3,402.14 

14.233.53 



68,800.02 
175,236.51 

14,521.11 

37,885.50 
1,054.05 
1,248.09 

15,655.87 
9,448.36 

12,811.26 



$ 340,240.46 
2,177.73 



$ 336,660.77 
844.08 



342,418. U 



337,504.85 



$ 7,029,593.02 



$ 5,855,949.82 



Operating ratio (ratio of operating expenses to operating revenues), 1920, 103.16 



per cent. 



42 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 
REVENUE FREIGHT CARRIED DURING THE YEAR 





Total Revenue 

Freight Carried 

1920 


Total Revenue 

Freight Carried 

1921 




Number of 
Carloads 


Number of 

Tons 
(2,000 lbs.) 


Number of 
Carloads 


Number of 

Tons 
(2,000 lbs.) 


Products of Agrictlture: 
Wheat 


42 
609 
508 


1,398 
12,106 

9,837 
183 
22,665 
17,542 
59,930 
64,845 
18,484 
70,919 
396 

4,857 
74,677 

7,372 

9,615 
18,680 


54 

482 

375 

20 

1,488 

851 

2,991 

7,483 

3,022 

4,504 

30 

673 

5,056 

1,160 

553 

1,726 


1 831 


Corn 


10 270 


Oats 


7 307 


Other grain 


18 


506 


Flour and meal 


1,198 

1,160 

4,846 

6.704 

2,246 

3,480 

38 

460 

4,528 

654 

648 

1,295 


21 534 


Other mill products 


12 663 


Hav, straw and alfalfa 


38 945 


Tobacco 

Cotton - - 


70,816 
24 656 


Cotton seed and products, except oil 


90,356 
358 


Other fresh fruits . - - 


6,834 


Potatoes . .-.--.._- 


80,542 




11,258 




8,566 


Other products of agriculture 


24,256 


Total 


28,434 


398,456 


30,468 


410,698 


Products of Animals: 
Horses and mules 


407 

231 

7 

132 

16 

54 

3 


4,299 

2,254 

78 

1,173 

245 

745 

37 


193 

191 

6 

96 

24 

84 

3 

1 

3 

3 

19 

238 


2,137 


Cattle and calves 

Sheep and goats 


1,028 
26 


Hogs 

Fresh meats 


971 
330 


Other packing-house products 

Poultry 

Eggs 


1,257 

32 

6 


Butter and Cheese 


8 

1 

23 

186 


103 

18 

47 

3,697 


32 


Wool 

Hides and leather 


48 
234 


Other products of animals 


5,434 


Total 


1,068 


12,696 


861 


11,535 


Products of Mines: 

Anthracite coal 

Bituminous coal 

Coke 

Iron ore 

Other ores and concentrates 


81 

4,679 

50 

1 

1 

8,769 

6 

47 

370 

72 


2,137 

230,123 

1,535 

32 

32 

- 477,271 

173 

1,548 

9,756 

2,396 


85 
4,569 
40 
3 
3 
10,838 


2,719 

214,595 

955 

50 

33 


Clay, gravel, sand, and stone 


507,969 


Crude petroleum 




Asphaltum ... 

Salt -- 


87 

321 

41 


2,829 
6,627 


Other products of mines 


1,243 






Total 

1 


14,076 


724,993 


15,987 


737.020 



I 



NORFOLK SOUTHERN RAILROAD 
REVENUE FREIGHT CARRIED DURING THE WEAR— Continued 



43 



Commodity 


Total Revenue 

Freight Carried 

1920 


Total Revenue 

Freight Carried 

1921 


Number of 
Carloads 


Number of 

Tons 
(2,000 lbs.) 


Number of 
Carloads 


Number of 

Tons 
(2,000 lbs.) 


Products of Forests: 

Logs, posts, poles and cordwood 

Ties 


9,806 
1,191 


275,320 
35,704 


9,714 

1,121 

12 

14,723 

97 


280,098 
31,706 


Pulp wood 


445 


Lumber, timber, box shooks, staves, and 


15,830 
121 


384,500 
3,048 


352,577 




1,567 






Total - 


26,948 


698,572 


25,667 


666,393 


Manufactures and Miscellaneous: 

Refined petroleum and its products 

Vegetable oils 

Sugar, sirup, glucose, and molasses 

Boats and vessel supplies 

Iron, pig and bloom. . 


1,812 

324 

371 

20 

26 

127 

407 
13 

615 
1,087 
3,509 
1,314 

319 

539 

1,851 

1,085 

114 

89 

1,320 

11,448 

22 

2,113 

215 

108 

5,605 


42,122 

7,739 

4,832 

387 

742 

3,146 

9,593 

385 

9,058 

38,417 

126,881 

28,669 

5,834 

6,598 

10,714 

9,084 

826 

1,311 

12,329 

261,858 

408 

63,238 

2,376 

1,922 

74,454 


1,605 

677 

271 

8 

7 

182 

396 
84 

435 
1,244 
3,712 

994 

412 

150 

1,161 

458 

71 

32 

1,307 

6,940 

51 

1,539 

446 

97 

4,157 


37,905 

19,975 

3,393 

59 

198 




6,044 


Bar and sheet iron, structural iron, and 
iron pipe 


9,650 
1,621 




6,584 


Cement- . 


48,523 


Brick and artificial stone. ...... 


118,497 


Lime and plaster . 


19,392 


Sewer pipe and drain tile . 


7,634 


Agricultural implements and vehicles other 


1,349 


Automobiles and autotrucks.. . 


7,117 


Household goods and secondhand furniture 
Furniture (new) ... 


3,471 
615 


Beverages... ... 


548 


Ice 


11,307 


Fertilizers (all kinds ) 


152,424 


Paper, printed matter, and books 

Chemicals and explosives . 


1,348 
40,977 


Textiles 


4,730 


Canned goods (all canned food products) 
Other manufactures and miscellaneous . . . 


2,099 
60,929 


Total 


34,453 


723,193 


26,436 


566 889 






Grand total, carload traflfic 

Merchandise— All L. C. L. freight 


104,979 


2,552,910 
250,856 


99,419 


2,392,535 
196,783 










Grand total, carload and L. C. L. traffic. 


104,979 


2,803,766 


99,419 


2,589,318 



44 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 
STATISTrCS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— ENTI RE LINE 



Item 


1920 


1921 


Average mileage of road operated . miles 


928.10 


942. 68 


Train-miles: 
Freight — ordinary . . 


697,778 


680 739 








697, 778 

1,348,270 

286,438 

5,972 


680, 739 




1,246,542 


Mixed ; . . 


270,179 


Special 1 


6,990 






Total transportation service _.. . .. 


2,338,458 


2,204,450 






Work service -. - -- - 


62,237 


53,216 






Locomotive-miles : 


710,493 
17,449 


744,153 


Freight— light --- _-- . . . . . 


15,567 






Freight— total . - -.-.... .... 


727,942 


759,720 






Passenger — principal 


1,024,484 
1,819 


901,672 


Passenger — light 


1,529 






Passenger — total -. __ . 


1,026,303 


903,201 






'Mixed train — principal 


286,541 
11,098 


273,431 


Mixed train — light ._- -- 


6,729 








297,639 


280,160 








6,332 

877 


6,814 




358 






Special— total . .. .. _. 


7,209 


7,172 






Train switching 


65,280 


67,990 






Yard switching — total 


301,641 


271,221 






Total transportation service - 


2,426,014 


2,289,464 








63,163, 


53,394 






Car-miles: 


12,281,597 
3,689,170 


13,349,402 


Freight train— empty 


4,031,445 


Sum of loaded and empty 


15,970,767 
673,992 


17,380,847 


Freight train — caboose 


662,456 






Freight train— total ... ... 


16,644,759 


18,043,303 




„ .. 


■" "' " "" " 




3,073,487 

436,954 

1,340,481 


2.664,652 


Passenger train— sleeping, parlor, and observation 

Passenger train— other 


453,621 
1,354,908 


Passenger train — total 


4.850,922 


4,473,181 







NORFOLK SOUTHERN RAILROAH 



45 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— ENTIRE UNE— Continued 



Item 


1920 


1921 


C\R-MiLES— Continued 


1,398,754 
391,521 
513,908 


1,866,018 




635,340 




252,634 




18,060 






186,938 










2,304,183 


2,958,990 






Special train— freight— loaded 

Special train— caboose 

Special train— passenger 


12.212 

299 

23,660 


8,021 
23.532 


Special train— total 


36,171 


31,553 




23,836,035 


25,507,027 








266,429 


142,155 






Freight Service: 
Tons — revenue freight 


2,838,065 
227,466 


2 589 318 


Tons — nonre venue freight 


228,488 


Tons— total 


3,065,531 


2 817 806 






Ton-miles — revenue freight 


243,756,187 
19,145,859 


260 556 886 


Ton-miles — nonrevenue freight 


17 590 424 






Ton-miles — total 


262,902,046 








Passenger Service: 
Passengers carried — revenue 


3,032,465 
73,343,755 


2 396 548 


Passenger- miles — revenue 


53 441 144 






Revexces and Expenses: 
Freight revenue 


$ 5,144,272.74 
2,027,925.72 
2,407,272.62 


1 5 946 351.56 


Passenger revenue 


1 632 955.49 


Passenger service train revenue 


1 890 588.42 






Operating revenues. 


$ 7,750,826.08 
8,274,079.32 


$ 8 056 794.94 


Operating expenses 


6 752 508.61 






Net operating revenues . . 


1 523,253.24 


1 1 304 286.33 






Averages per Mile of Road: 
Freight-train miles ... 


752 

1,453 

309 

6 

2,520 

67 

2,614 

19,877 

5,806 

$ 5,542.80 

2,593.76 

8,351.28 

8,915.07 


722 


Passenger-train miles. ... . 


1,322 


Mixed-train miles. . .... 


287 


Special-train miles 


7 




2,338 
56 


Work-train miles .. ... . 


Locomotive-miles— transportation.,.^ .. 


2,429 


Freight service car-miles.. . ... 


21,802 


Passenger service car-miles... _ .. 


5,255 


Freight revenue . .. . ... ... . 


$ 6,307.92 
2,005.55 
8,546.69 


Passenger service train revenue .. . . 


Operating revenues . . ... .. .. .. 


Operating expenses .. 


7,163.10 



46 



N. C. COKPOBATION COMMISSION 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— ENTIRE UNE-Continued 



Item 



1920 



Averages per Mile of Roav— Continued 

Net operating revenues 

Ton- miles — revenue freight. - 

Ton-miles — all freight 

Passenger-miles — revenue 

Averages per Train-mile: 

Loaded freight car-miles — freight trains 

Loaded freight car-miles — mixed trains 

Empty freight car-miles — freight trains 

Empty freight car-miles — mixed trains 

Ton- miles — revenue freight 

Ton-miles — all freight 

Passenger train car-miles — passenger trains 

Passenger train car-miles — mixed trains 

Revenue passenger-miles 

Freight revenue 

Passenger service train revenue 

Operating revenues 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenues 

Averages per Locomotive-mile: 

Train- miles — freight trains 

Car-miles — freight trains 

Train-miles — passenger trains 

Car-miles — passenger trains 

Train-miles — mixed trains 

Car-miles — mi xed trains 

Train-miles— special trains 

Car-miles— special trains 

Averages per Loaded Freight Car-mile: 

Ton-miles — revenue freight 

Ton-miles — all freight 

Freight revenue 

Averages per Car-mile— Passenger: 

Passenger- miles — revenue 

Passenger revenue 

Miscellaneous Averages: 

Miles hauled — revenue f rei ght 

Miles hauled — nonrevenue freight 

Miles hauled — all freight 

Miles carried — revenue passengers 

Revenue per ton of freight.-- 

Revenue per ton-mile of freight 

Revenue per passenger 

Revenue per passenger-mile 

Operating rati o 



563.79 
262,640 
283,269 

79,026 



17.60 

4.88 

5.29 

1.37 

247.67 

267.12 

3.60 

1.79 

44.86 

5.23 

1.47 

3.32 

3.54 

.22 



.96 

22.87 

1.31 

4.73 



% 



7.74 

.83 

5.02 



17.82 

19.22 

376.03 



18.22 
503.91 



85.89 
84.17 
85.76 
24.19 
1,812.60 
.02110 
. 66874 
.02765 
106.75 



NORFOLK SOUTHERN RAILROAD 
STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATI ONS— WITHIN THE STATE 



47 



Item 


1920 


1921 


Average mileage of road operated miles 


814.85 


829.65 


Train-miles: 


64,814 


631,156 








64,814 

942,689 

265,437 

5,399 


631,156 




852,266 


Mixed - 


258,634 


Special - - - - 


6,242 








1,861,936 


1,748,298 








57,686 


53.074 






Locomotive-miles: 


660,322 
16,429 


694,570 


Freight— light ..- . _ - .. - -_ 


14,384 






Freight— total .-..-.-_ . .. ..- 


676,751 


708,954 








945,307 
1,746 


840,876 




1,455 








947,053 


842,331 








265,521 
10,383 


261,886 




6,171 








275,904 


268,057 








5,759 

877 


6,066 


Special— Hght . -- --- - - - --- 


358 








6,636 


6,424 








59,801 


66,976 








280, 149 


189,309 






Total transportation service 


2,246,294 


2 082 049 








58,612 


53,252 






Car-miles: 
Freight train — loaded 


10,761,423 
3,197,488 


11 850 844 


Freight train — empty 


3 546 744 






Sum of loaded and empty 


13,958,911 
623,875 


15 397,588 


Freight train — caboose 


613,050 






Freight train — total 


14,582,786 


16,010,638 








2,170,131 

390,292 

1,251,774 


1,803,451 




406,497 




1,267,354 






Passenger train— total 


3,812,197 


3,477,302 



48 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION" 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— WITHIN THE ST ATE-Continued 



Item 



CA-R-Mii^ES—Cuntinued 

Mi xed train — freight — loaded 

Mixed train — freight — empty 

Mixed train — passenger 

Mixed train — sleeping, parlor^ and observation. 
Mixed train — other passenger-train 



Mixed train^totaL 



Special train — freight — loaded . 

Special train — caboose 

Special train — passenger 



Special train — total- 



Total transportation service- 
Work service 



Freight Service: 

Tons — revenue freight 

Tons — nonrevenue freight . 

Tons — total 



Ton-miles- 
Ton-miles- 



-revenue freight 

-nonrevenue freight . 



Ton-miles — totaL 



Passenger Service: 
Passengers carried — revenue . 
Passenger-miles — revenue 



Revenues and Expenses: 

Freight revenue 

Passenger revenue 

service train revenue- 



Operating revenue.. 
Operating expenses. 



Net operating revenues. 



Averages per Mile of Road: 

Freight-train miles --_- 

Passenger-train miles 

Mixed-train miles 

Special-train miles 

Transportation service train-miles. 

Work-train miles 

Locomotive-miles — transportation. 

Freight service car-miles 

Passenger service car-miles 

Frei ght revenue 

Passenger service train-revenue 

Operating revenues 

Operating expenses.. 



1920 



1,266,027 
336,597 
494,556 



2,097,180 



4,888 

299 

22,107 



27,294 



20,519,457 



242,999 



2,498,349 
199,784 



2,698,133 



1921 



1,735,189 

579,823 

233,446 

18,060 

184,026 



2,750,544 



18,201 



25,687 



22,264,171 



2,301,127 
203,057 



214,578,571 
16,854,100 



231,432,671 



2,669,479 
64,564,508 



$ 4,528,503.29 
1,785,183.01 
2,119,122.09 



I 6,814,019.02 
7,029,593.02 



$ 215,574.00 



2,504.184 



231,556,905 
15,632,610 



247,189,515 



1,870,985 
41,721,501 



$ 5,284,502.91 
1,274,841.57 
1,515,932.73 



$ 6,929,298.03 
5,855,949.82 



$ 1,073,348.21 



'796 


761 


1,157 


1,027 


326 


312 


7 


8 


2,285 


2,107 


71 


64 


2,757 


2,510 


19,869 


21,359 


5,312 


4,738 


362.30 


$ 6,369.56 


600.63 


1,827.20 


362.30 


8,352.07 


626.86 


7,058.34 



NORFOLK SOUTHERN RAILROAD 



49 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS-WITHIN THE STAJE-Continuod 



Item 



k 



k 



Averages per Mile of Road — Continued 

Net operating revenues 

Ton-miles — revenue freight 

Ton-miles — all freight 

Passenger- miles — revenue 

Averages per Train-mile: 

Loaded freight car-miles — freight trains 

Loaded freight car-miles — mixed trains 

Empty freight car-miles — freight trains 

Empty freight car-miles — mixed trains 

Ton-miles — revenue freight 

Ton-miles — all freight 

Passenger train car-miles — passenger trains 

Passenger train car-miles — mixed trains 

Revenue passenger- miles 

Freight revenue 

Passenger service train revenue 

Operating revenues 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenues 

Averages per Locomotive-mile: 

Train-miles — freight trains 

Car-miles — freight trains.. 

Train-miles — passenger trains 

Car-miles — passenger trains 

Train-miles — mixed trains 

Car-miles — mixed trains 

Train-miles — special trains 

Car-miles — special trains 

Averages per Loaded Freight Car-mile: 

Ton-miles — revenue freight 

Ton-miles — all freight 

Freight revenue 

Averages per Car-mile— Passenger: 

Passenger-miles — revenue 

Passenger revenue 

Miscellaneous Averages: 

Miles hauled — revenue freight 

Miles hauled — nonrevenue freight 

Miles hauled — all freight 

Miles carried— revenue passengers 

• Revenue per ton of freight 

Revenue per ton-mile of freight 

Revenue per passenger..^ 

Revenue per passenger-mile 

Operating ratio 



1920 



264.56 


263,335 


284,019 


79,235 


16.60 


4.77 


4.93 


1.27 


234.81 


253.25 


4.04 


1.86 


53.44 


4.96 


1.75 


• 3.66 


3.78 


.12 


.96 


21.55 


1.00 


4.03 


.96 


7.60 


.81 


4.11 


17.84 


19.24 


.37651 


21.13 


.58435 



85.89 
84.36 
85.78 
24.19 
1.81260 
.02110 
.66874 
.02765 
103.16 



1921 



1,293.73 


279,102 


297,944 


50,288 


18.78 


6.71 


5.62 


2.24 


272.93 


291.36 


4- 08 


1.68 


46.69 


6.23 


1.70 


3.96 


3.35 



22.58 


1.01 


4.13 


.96 


10.26 


.97 


4.00 


17.04 


18.12 



16.95 
.51792 



100.63 

76.99 
98.71 
22.30 
2.29648 
.02282 
.68138 
.03056 
84.51 



50 



N. C. COBPORATION COMMISSION 













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51 









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52 



N. C. CORPOEATION COMMISSION' 



EQUIPMENT OWNED OR LEASED, IN SERVICE OF THE RESPONDENT 





Company Service Equipment 


Class of Equipment 


Units Available for Service 
at Close of Year 1920 


Units Available for Service 
at Close of Year 1921 




Total 
Number 


Number 
Fully 
Owned 


Total 
Number 


Number 
Fully 
Owned 




2 

72 
2 
2 

65 


2 
47 
2 
2 
62 


2 
72 
2 
2 
65 


2 


Ballast cars 

Derrick cars 


47 
2 
2 


Other company service cars 


62 






All classes of company service cars 


143 


115 


143 


115 


All classes of cars in service 


3,870 


3,268 


3,835 


3,234 







EQUIPMENT OWNED OR LEASED, IN SERVICE OF THE RESPONDENT 







Floating 


Equipment 




Class of Equipment 


Units Available for Service 
at Close of Year 1920 


Units Available for Service 
at Close of Year 1921 




Total 
Number 


Number 
Fully 
Owned 


• Total 
Number 


Number 
Fully 
Owned 


Steamboats and tugboats 


1 
14 


1 
14 


1 
14 


1 


Barges, car floats, and canal boats 


14 






Total floating equipment 


15 


15 


15 


15 






Equipment Owned or Leased, Not in 
Service of Respondent: 

Locomotives 


2 


2 


2 


2 




1 



i 



JSTORFOLK SQUTHERN RAILROAD 



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54 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 
EMPLOYEES AND THEIR COMPENSATION 



Class of Employees 



1920 



Average 
Number of 
Employees 
in Service 



Total 
Compensa- 
tion During 

Year 



1921 



Average 
Number of 
Employees 
in Service 



Total 
Compensa- 
tion During 

Year 



General officers, $3,000 per annum and upwards 

General officers, below $3,000 per annum 

Division officers, $3,000 per annum and upwards 

Division officers, below $3,000 per annum 

Clerks, $900 per annum and upwards 

Clerks, below $900 per annum 

Messengers and attendants 

Assistant engineers and draftsmen 

Maintenance of way and structure foremen 

Section foremen 

General foremen — M. E. department 

Gang and other foremen— M. E. department... 

Machi nists 

Boiler makers 

Blacksmiths 

Masons and bricklayers 

Carpenters 

Painters and upholsterers 

Electrici ans 

Air-brake men 

Car inspectors 

Car repairers 

Other skilled laborers 

Mechanics' helpers and apprentices 

Section men 

Other unskilled laborers 

Traveling agents and solicitors 

Employees in outside agencies 

Train dispatchers and directors 

Telegraphers, telephoners, and block operators 
Telegraphers and telephoners operating inter- 
lockers 

Levermen (nontelegraphers ) 

Telegrapher-clerks 

Agent-telegraphers 

Station agents (nontelegraphers) 

Station masters and assistants 

Station service employees 

Yardmasters 

Yardmaster's assistants (not yard clerks) 

Yard engineers and motormen 

Yard firemen and helpers 

Yard conductors (or foremen) 

Yard brakemen (switchmen or helpers) 

Other yard employees 

Hostlers 

Enginehouse-men 

Road freight engineers and motormen 

Road freight firemen and helpers 

Road freight conductors 

Road freight brakemen and flagmen 

Road passenger engineers and motormen 

Road passenger firemen and helpers 



22 

4 

13 

14 

399 

15 

18 

5 

14 

105 

3 

25 

56 

15 

15 

1 

131 

14 

18 

3 

23 
97 
69 
140 
513 
165 
19 



261 

3 

1 

20 

19 

20 

S6 

4 

10 

57 

44 

42 

43 

105 
23 
15 



141,370.86 

9,657.62 

54,191.50 

35,492.44 

645,250.90 

5,982.05 

14,684.62 

13,771.74 

29,168.16 

177,931.92 

11,220.00 

69,063.29 

121,736.82 

38,672.78 

29,146.57 

622.12 

202,099.86 

25,517.39 

36,027.02 

5,921.19 

60,808.12 

167,502.93 

134,682.40 

219,928.14 

525,485.70 

183,822.97 

51,760.53 

12,234.81 

46,156.39 

9,216.78 

6,107.07 

15,611.13 

33,530.34 

107,720.73 

92,471.86 

2,515.94 

317,014.76 

8,939.00 

2,680.00 

54,339.48 

39,360.97 

52,253.30 

83,767.31 

6,571.25 

24,042.50 

98,201.58 

161,127.42 

115,407.25 

134,733.16 

255,583.48 

86,258.20 

45,147.72 




118 
7 

17 

1 

23 

52 

41 

95 

345 

102 

33 

14 



21 
69 
80 

1 
184 

3 

1 

18 
18 
18 
29 

3 



81,688.35 

3,571.90 

25,780.60 

16,689.93 

322,874.22 

1,875.47 

7,743.46 

11,070.84 

13,119.45 

79,116.19 

3,813.12 

29,492.18 

47,455.01 

17,575.00 

11,334.69 



73,563.15 

6,541.09 
17,117.33 

1,703.15 
27,469.59 
58,599.83 
38,030.18 
83,667.36 
104,348.84 
56,359.64 
40,289.23 

9,032.03 
22,633.97 

4,642.45 

5,517.31 

5,737.52 

17,336.54 

56,249.29 

46,188.12 

1,283.00 

94,995.97 

4,240.43 

1,583.79 

24,245.22 

19,418.22 

24,136.75 

33,904.77 

2,759.13 

11,069.81 

47,934.93 

79,634.35 

57,547.90 

65,332.60 

117,092.71 

42,651.47 

21,924.69 



NOEFOLK SOUTHERN RAILROAD 
EMPLOYEES AND THEIR COMPENS^^\ON— Continued 



55 



Class of Employees 



Road passenger conductors 

Road passenger baggagemen 

Road passenger brakemen and flagmen 

Other road train employees 

Crossing flagmen and gatemen 

Drawbridge operators 

Floating equipment employees 

Policemen and watchmen 

Other transportation employees 

All other employees 

Total 



1920 



Average 
Number of 
Employees 
in Service 



2,977 



Total 
Compensa- 
tion During 

Year 



74,149.26 
25,540.87 
36,261.95 
44,624.15 
26,037.30 
20,872.03 
17,180.79 
28,238.67 
1,019.00 
1,665.09 



$5,098,101.18 



1921 



Average 
Number of 
Employees 
in Service 



2,492 



Total 
Compensa- 
tion During 

Year 



37,418.57 
13,149.76 
18,400.29 
13,061.63 
14,718.43 
10,623.82 
8,506.22 
14,407.23 
855.40 
758.90 



$ 2, 129. J 



.02 



I 



56 



]S'. C. COKPORATIOX COMMISSION 



ATLANTIC AND NORTH CAROLINA RAILROAD COMPANY 

Leased by Norfolk Southern Railroad Company 
OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




C. D. Bradham 

W. Stamps Howard 

W. Stamps Howard 

W. F. Evans 

Charles V. Webb . - 


New Bern, X C 




Tarboro, N C 


Treasurer 

General Counsel 


Tarboro, N. C. 
Raleigh, N. C. 
Morehead City, N.C. 
Wilson, N. C. 




T. Bodie Ward 









DIRECTORS 

H. D. Bateman, Wilson, N. C; David F. McKinnie, Louisburg, N. C; C. D. Bradham, New Bern, 
N. C; Joseph F. Patterson, New Bern, N. C; T. Austin Finch, Thomasville, N. C; L. H. Cutler, New- 
Bern, N. C; M. L. Jones, Goldsboro,N. C; J. Y. Joyner, LaGrange, N. C ; Courtney Mitchell, Kinston, 
N. C; Geo. F. Folk, Raleigh, N. C; W. H. McElivee, Raleigh, N. C; D. W. Patrick, Snow Hill, N. C. 



ROAD OPERATED 



From 


To 


Miles 


N.C. 


Total 


Goldsboro, N. C. 


Morehead Citv, N. C 




95.00 











CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 



1920 



1,797,200.00 

18,917.90 

325,000.00 

3,421.05 

2,122,200.00 

22,338.94 



1,797.200.00 

18,917.90 

325,000.00 

3,421.05 

2.122,200.00 

22.338.94 



Note. — This railroad is operated by Norfolk and Southern Railroad Company and revenues, 
perating expenses and other information are included in their report. 



SEABOARD AIR LIXE RAILWAY 



Di 



SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILWAY COMPANY 

PRINCIPAL GENERAL OFFICERS, 1921 



Title of General Officer 



President 

First Vice President 

Vice President 

Vice President 

Vice President 

General Counsel (at New York) 

Vice President and Secretary-Treasurer. 

General Counsel (at Washington) 

General Solicitor 

Vice President and Comptroller 

General Auditor 

General Manager 

Chief Engineer 

Mechanical Superintendent 

General Superintendent 



Name of person holding office 
at close of year 



S. Davies Warfield : 

Chas. R. Capps 

M. J. Caples 

W. R. Bonsai 

W. L. Seddan 

Hornblower, Miller and Harrison 

Robt. L. Nutt 

Forney Johnson 

James F. Wright 

L. R. Powell, Jr 

H. W. Mackenzie 

M. H. Cahill 

W. D. Faucette 

C. S. Patton 

P. G. Walton 



Official Addre s 

Baltimore, Md. 
Norfolk, Va. 
Norfolk, Va. 
Charleston, S. C. 
Norfolk, Va. 
New York, N. Y. 
New York, N. Y. 
Washington, D. C. 
Norfolk, Va. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Portsmouth, Va. 
Norfolk, Va. 
Norfolk, Va. 
Portsmouth, Va 
Savannah, Ga. 



DIRECTORS 

Milton E. Ailes, Washington, D. C; FrankHn Q. Brown, New York, N. Y.; F. N. B. Close, New 
York, N. Y.; James C. Colgate, New York, N. Y.; Pierpont V. Davis, New York, N. Y.; Samuel L. 
Fuller, New York, N. Y. ; Mills B. Lane, Savannah, Ga. ; L. F. Lorec, New York, N.Y. ; Robt. F. Maddox, 
Atlanta, Ga. ; J. Wm. Middendorf , Baltimore, Md. ; Robt. L. Nutt, New York, N. Y. ; Robert C. Ream, 
New York, N. Y.; W. T. Rosen, New York, N. Y.; J. P. Taliaferro, Jacksonville, Fla.; S. Davies War- 
field, Baltimore, Md.; A. H. Woodward, Woodward, Ala.; B. F. Yoakum, New York, N. Y 

HISTORY 

1. Exact name of common carrier making this report: SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILWAY. 

2. Date of organization: August 5, 1897, as Richmond, Petersburg and Carolina Railroad Com- 
pany, successor to Virginia and Carolina Railroad Company, which latter was incorporated by Acts 
of General Assembly of Virginia, February 23, 1882, and of North Carolina, February 7, 1883. Re- 
ceivers appointed and assumed charge of properties January 2, 1908. Adjustment plan approved and 
decree directing receivers to turn over the property and business under their control to Seaboard Air 
Line Railway at midnight, November 4, 1909, entered and filed October 18, 1909. Conditions pre- 
scribed in said decree duly complied with, and decree discharging receiver entered and filed December 
18, 1909. 

3. Under laws of what Government, State, or Territory organized? If more than one, name all. 
Give specific reference to each statute and all amendments thereof: 

Virginia, February 23, 1882, as Virginia and Carolina Railroad Company, and North Carolina, 
February 7, 1883, as Virginia and Carolina Railroad Company, the purchaser of whose property and 
franchises at judicial sale, became incorporated as Richmond, Petersburg and Carolina Railroad Com- 
pany, which, by Act of Virginia Assembly, January 12, 1900, and Act of North Carolina Assembly 
January 31, 1899, became legal successors of Virginia and Carolina Railroad Company. Change of 
name to Seaboard Air Line Railway authorized by Circuit Court of City of Richmond, Virginia, April 
10, 1900. 

4. If a consolidated or a merging company, name all constituent and all merging companies. Give 
specific reference to charters or general laws governing organization of each, and all amendments of 
same. 

The following constituent companies were parties to the consoUdation effected November 7, 1901, 
forming Seaboard Air Line Railway: 

SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILWAY, organized as Richmond, Petersburg and Carolina Railroad 
Company, successor to Virginia and Carolina Railroad Company. Incorporated under laws of Vir- 
ginia, Acts February 23, 1882, amended March e, 1886, February 24, 1888, February 12, 1890; consoli- 



—15 



58 K. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

dation authorized by Act of January 12, 1900; of North CaroHna, Acts of February 7, 1883; January 
31, 1899, February 22, 1899; consoUdation authorized by Act of February 27, 1901. 

RALEIGH AND GASTON RAILROAD COMPANY, incorporated under laws of North Caro- 
lina, Act of January 29, 1851, amended and enlarged by Acts of December 25, 1852, January 20, 185.i, 
February 23, 1861, December 16, 1865, January 19, 1866, March 4, 1867, December 4, 1871, March 1, 1897; 
consolidation authorized by Act of February 16, 1899, as amended by Act ratified February 24, 1899. 

RALEIGH AND AUGUSTA AIR LINE RAILROAD COMPANY, to which name was changed, 
by Act ratified December 13, 1871, organized as Chatham Railroad Company, under laws of North 
Carolina, Act of February 15, 1861, amended, modified, and enlarged by Acts of February 23, 1861, Feb- 
ruary 5, 1863, January 30, 1862, February 10, 1862, August 3, 1868, August 15, 1868, April 10, 1869, April 
1, 1871, December 13, 1871, February 23, 1885, March 6, 1891; consolidation authorized by Act of Feb- 
ruary 16, 1899. 

CAROLINA CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY, organized under the laws of North Carolina, 
Act of March 1, 1873, and by Act of January 18, 1881, legal possessor of rights, powers, and franchises 
of Carolina Central Railway Company, incorporated by Act of February 20, 1873, charter amended, 
modified, and enlarged by Acts of March 2, 1887, March 7, 1887; consolidation authorized by Act ratified 
February 16, 1899. 

GEORGIA, CAROLINA AND NORTHERN RAILWAY COMPANY, a consolidated corpora- 
tion of the States of North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia; name was changed by Act of Legis- 
lature of State of South Carolina, approved December 24, 1886, from Chester, Greenwood and Abbe- 
ville Railroad Company organized under laws of South Carolina, Act of December 22, 1885, consoh- 
dation authorized under Act approved February 27, 1899, and under general laws of State; incorporated 
under laws of Georgia by Act approved December 7, 1886, consolidation effected under general law- 
incorporated under laws of North Carolina by Act ratified January 18,1887, consolidation authorized 
by Act ratified February 16, 1899. 

SEABOARD AIR LINE BELT RAILROAD COMPANY, incorporated July 22, 1892, and con- 
solidated under general laws of State of Georgia. 

PALMETTO RAILROAD COMPANY, organized under laws of South Carolina, Act approved 
December 21, 1882, amended by Acts of December 26, 1884, and December 22, 1886, consolidation author- 
ized under Act approved February 27, 1899; laws of North Carolina, Act of February 7, 1883, amended 
by Act of February 3, 1891, consolidation authorized by Act ratified February 16, 1899. 

CHESTERFIELD AND KERSHAW RAILROAD COMPANY, organized under laws of South 
Carolina, Acts approved December 24, 1889, consolidation authorized under Act approved February 
27, 1899. 

SOUTHBOUND RAILROAD COMPANY, organized under laws of South Carolina, Act ap- 
proved February 9, 1882, amended and enlarged by Acts approved December 24, 1886, December 24, 
1887, December 24, 1889, December 24, 1890, December 24, 1892; consolidation authorized under Act 
approved February 27, 1899; Georgia, organized under Act approved September 26, 1889, recognizing 
and confirming organization under certificate of incorporation obtained from Secretary of State, No- 
vember 5, 1888. 

SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILWAY, the corporation formed by such consolidation, was, by agree- 
ment dated June 27, 1903, filed in the office of the Secretary of State for the States of Virginia, South 
Carolina, Georgia, Florida, and Alabama, August 15, 1903; and for the State of North Carolina, August 
17, 1903, and under such general and special laws of the several States merged with the Florida Central 
and Peninsular Railway Company, the corporation formed by the merger and consolidation of the 
Florida Central and Penin'feular Railroad Company. Incorporated under the laws of Florida, by 
letters patent, issued November 17, 1888, amended and enlarged December 13, 1892, and by Act of Legis- 
lature approv^ed June 4, 1897. 

The following constituent companies of the Seaboard Air Line Railway were purchased: 

DURHAM AND NORTHERN RAILWAY COMPANY, organized under the laws of North Caro- 
lina, Act of February 2, 1887, acquired under indenture dated September 13, 1901, purchase author- 
ized under laws of Virginia, Act of January 12, 1900; North CaroHna, Acts of February 16, 1899, and Feb- 
ruary 27, 1901. 

LOGANSVILLE AND LAWRENCEVILLE RAILROAD OF GEORGIA, organized under the 
general laws of Georgia under charter issued by the Secretary of State, March 30, 1898, acquired under 
indenture dated February 27, 1902, purchase authorized under laws of Virginia and North Carolina 
by special acts of Legislature, as indicated above, and general laws of Georgia. 

GEORGIA AND ALABAMA RAILWAY, a consolidated corporation under the general laws ol 
Georgia and Alabama, organized under general laws of Georgia under charter issued by Secretary of 
State, July 26, 1895, certificates amending and enlarging charter filed or recorded January 25, 1896, No 
vember 9, 1898; organized under general laws of Alabama under charter issued by Secretary of State, 
July 20, 1895, amended by acts of Legislature, February 8, 1897, and February 3, 1899, acquired under 



SEABOAKD AIR LINE RAILWAY 59 

indenture dated February 20, 1902, purchase authorized under laws of Virginia and North Carolina 
by special Acts of Legislature, as indicated above, and general laws of South Carohna, Georgia, and 
Alabama. 

OXFORD AND COAST LINE RAILROAD COMPANY, organized under laws of North Caro- 
lina, Act of March 5, 1891, acquired under indenture dated June 28, 1906, purchase authorized under 
special laws of Virginia and North Carolina, as indicated above, and under general laws of other States. 

CATAWBA VALLEY RAILWAY, organized May 9, 1906, under general laws of South Carolina, 
particularly Sections 1917-1934, inclusive, Code of 1902, acquired under indenture dated September 

27, 1909, purchase authorized under special statutes of Virginia and North Carolina and under general 
laws of South Carohna. 

FLORIDA WEST SHORE RAILWAY, organized October 20, 1899, under general laws of Florida 
letters patent incorporating the United States and West Indies Railroad and Steamship Company, 
issued January 5, 1900, name changed to Florida West Shore Railway by resolutions adopted May 5, 
1903, which were approved, and authority to exercise powers and privileges of the corporation granted 
to said Florida West Shore Railway by letters patent issued May 9, 1903, and charter further amended, 
modified and enlarged by letters patent issued June 17, 1903, and August 22, 1906. acquired by indenture 
dated September 30, 1909; purchase authorized under special laws of States of Virginia and North Caro- 
lina and general laws of the State of Florida. 

TALLAHASSEE, PERRY, AND SOUTHEASTERN RAILWAY, organized November 22, 1905, 
under general laws of Florida, and acquired by purchase the properties of the Tallahassee Southeastern 
Railway Company, chartered originally as the Florida, Georgia and Western Railway Company, 
by Act of Legislature approved May 7, 1891, charter amended and enlarged by Chapter 4263 of the 
laws of Florida, approved May 20, 1893, name changed to Tallahassee Southeastern Railway, Chapter 
4477, Laws of Florida, approved May 30, 1895, charter further amended and enlarged by Chapter 4624 
of the Laws of Florida, approved May 31, 1897, and Chapter 5023 of tne Laws of Florida, approved 
May 28, 1901, acquired by Seaboard Air Line Railway by indenture dated September 29, 1909; purchase 
authorized under special laws of Virginia and North Carolina and general laws of the State of Florida. 

PLANT CITY, ARCADIA AND GULF RAILWAY, organized February 7, 1905, under general 
laws of State of Florida, to operate the railroad formerly owned by the Wannee Lumber and Veneer 
Company, and originally a wooden tram-road, constructed in 1898, for use in its logging operations; 
reorganized under general laws of Florida February 7, 1905; acquired by indenture dated September 

28, 1909; purchase authorized under special laws of States of Virginia and North Carolina and general 
laws of State of Florida. 

ATLANTIC, SUWANNEE RIVER, AND GULF RAILWAY COMPANY, incorporated under 
laws of Florida by Act approved May 24, 1893; acquired by indenture dated September 30, 1909; pur- 
chase authorized under special laws of Virginia and North Carolina and general laws of Florida. 

ATLANTA AND BIRMINGHAM AIR LINE RAILWAY, a consoHdated corporation com- 
posed of: 

(a) The East and West Railroad Company, incorporated in Alabama under general laws by letters 
patent issued January 11, 1894; incorporated in Georgia January 15, 1896, and branch line from Rock- 
mart to point near Marietta, Georgia, builc under general laws (Code 1895) and, 

(6) Chattahoochee Terminal Railway, incorporated and chartered under and by virtue of general 
laws of State of Georgia (Code 1895), February 16, 1903. Consolidation effected under general laws 
of States of Georgia and Alabama, May 20, 1903; decree directing receiveis (appointed February 24, 
1908, and March 17, 1909, respectively) to turn over the property and business under their control to 
the railway, entered and filed October 19, 1909; conditions prescribed in said decree duly complied with 
and receivers discharged by decree entered December 30, 1909; acquired by Seaboard Air Line Railway 
under indenture dated September 30, 1909 ; purchase authorized under special laws of Virginia and North 
Carolina and general laws of States of Georgia and Alabama. 

SEABOARD AND ROANOKE RAILROAD COMPANY, incorporated under laws of Virginia, 
Act of February 27, 1846, and prior acts, as successor to Portsmouth and Roanoke Railroad Company, 
incorporated by Act passed March 8, 1832, united with Roanoke Railroad Company under Act of 
February 1, 1848, charter modified, amended, and enlarged by Acts of March 17, 1849, January 10, 1851, 
March 28, 1851, February 19, 1852, March 19, 1852, permanent provision of charter declared and acts 
inconsistent therewith repealed by Act passed January 26, 1853, amended and enlarged January 9, 
1856, February 18, 1858, January 18, 1872, November 29, 1884. March 1, 1886, January 26, 1892, under 
laws of North Carolina, Act of January 16, 1849, uniting the Roanoke Railroad Company, incorpor- 
ated under Act ratified January 15, 1847, with Seaboard and Roanoke Railroad Company, modified, 
amended, and enlarged by Act of January 29, 1849, December 28, 1850, January 17, 1851, January 28, 
1851, permanent provisions of charter declared and acts inconsistent therewith repealed by Act rati- 
fied November 29, 1852, amended and enlarged by Acts January 9, 1855, February 2, 1857. Acquired 
by Seaboard Air Line R,ailway by deed dated September 15, 1911, purchase authorized under general 
and special laws of Virginia and North Carolina. 



60 N. C. COKPORATION COMMISSION 

ROANOKE AND TAR RIVER RAILROAD COMPANY, organized under laws of North Caro- 
lina, Acts of February 25, 1871, and March 5, 1885, amended and enlarged by Acts of February 28, 18S7, 
and March 2. 1887, acquired by Seaboard Air Line Railway by deed dated September 15, 1911; pur- 
chase authorized under general and special laws of Virginia and North Carolina. 

In addition to the above the GEORGIA AND ALABAMA TERMINAL COMPANY (con- 
trolled through stock ownership and lease) organized under laws of Georgia under charter issued 
November 9, 1898, forms, and is operated as a part of the Seaboard Air Line Railway system. 

If a reorganized company, give name of original corporation, refer to laws under which it was 
organized, and state the occasion for the reorganization: 

Reorganization effected without sale or foreclosure by restoration of properties to owners because 
of conditions making such a course best to the interest of stockholders and creditors of the corporation . 



SEABOABD AIR LIXE RAILWAY 



61 



COMPARATIVE GENERAL BALANCE SHEET— ASSET SIDE 



Balance at 

Beginning of 

Year 1920 



Item 



» 



$192,002, 033. 93 

78,269.19 

80.31 

31,918.90 

590,816.69 

2,214,193.53 

1,189,652.69 

484,846.71 

1.113,923.91 

332,609.82 
739,850.00 

36,111.99 
175,505.04 

63,000.00 



1199,052,812.71 



S 51,747.04 

1,240,173.82 

22,943.23 

14,864.38 



311,841.52 
6, 380., 56 
9,597.80 



$ 1,657,548.35 



$ 298,094.09 
5,636,310.82 



S 5.934.410.91 



$ 9,998.48 
4,745,125.36 
15,702,831.51 

$ 20,457,955.35 



$227,102,727.32 



Investments: 

Investment in road and equipment 

Improvements on leased railway property. -. 

Sinking funds 

Deposits in lieu of mortgaged property sold. 

Miscellaneous physical property 

Investments in affiliated companies: 

(a) Stocks 

(b) Bonds 

(c) Notes 

(d) Advances 

Other investments: 

(a ) Stocks 

(b) Bonds 

(c) Notes . . . 

(d) Advances 

(e) Miscellaneous 



Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1920 



Balance at 

Close of Year 

1921 



Total investments. 



Current Assets: 
Cash 



Special deposits 

Loans and bills receivable 

Traffic and car-service balances receivable 

Net balance receivable from agents and conductors 

Miscellaneous accounts receivable 

Material and supplies 

Interest and dividends receivable 

Rents receivable 

Other current 



Total current assets. 



Deferred Assets: 
Working fund advances. 
Other deferred 



Total deferred assets. 



Unadjusted Debits: 

Rents and insurance premiums paid in advance- 
Discount on funded debt 

Other unadj usted ^debits 



Total unadjusted debits. 
Grand total 



$192 



,937,827.43 
116,238.63 
80.31 
878,070.63 
744,757.96 

,413,593.53 
,189,652.69 
485,477.03 
,472,685.13 

83,859.82 
752,850.00 

45,036.99 
191,981.08 

63,000.00 



$201,375,111.23 



$ 2, 



381,705.85 

994,853.12 

16.843.23 

351,296.02 

382,368.65 

359,494.57 

477,641.61 

29,767.11 

26,157.01 

559,795.28 



$ 13,579,922.45 



$ 257,032.79 
6,728,733.09 



$ 6,985,765. 



$ 39,507.97 
4,614,972.63 
17,682,798.77 



$ 22,337,279.37 



$244,278,078.93 



$ 193,702,841.46 

108,260.39 

177.04 

745,771.71 

752,493.66 

2,413,593.53 

1,189,710.23 

505,102.03 

2,504,610.26 

83,859.82 
752,850.00 

70,122.99 
185,673.10 

63,000.00 



$ 203,078,066.22 



2,455,187.59 

897,119.89 

24,265.92 

893,523.58 

194,427.48 

1,354,281.07 

4,101,904.27 

665,617.55 

8,167.71 

526,669.43 



$ 11,121,164. 



$ 297,091.76 

6,527,470.28 



$ 6,824,562.04 



25,284.90 
4,777,555.66 
18,691,092.14 



$ 23,493,932.70 



I 244,217,725.45 



62 N. C. COKPOKA.TIOTSI COMMISSION 

COMPARATIVE GENERAL BALANCE SHEET— LIABILITY SIDE 



Balance at 

Beginning of 

Year 1920 


Item 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1920 


Balance at 

Close of Year 

1921 


$ 60,950,800.00 


Stock: 
Capital stock 


S 60,950,800.00 


$ 60 950 800 00 




Total stock 

Long-Term Debt: 
Funded debt unmatured 

(a) Notes 

(b) Open accounts 




» 60,950,800.00 


$ 60,950,800.00 


$ 60,950,800.00 


$129,200,500.00 
100,000.00 
148,369.01 


$133,053,900.00 
100,000.00 
175,512.97 


$ 134,700.900.00 
100,000.00 
19f) 480 72 




Total long-term debt 

Current Liabilities: 




$ 29,448,869.01 


$133,329,412.97 


$ 135,000.380.72 


$ 9,468,750.00 


$ 8,735,000.00 

1,439,670.71 

4,035,841.11 

445,607.27 

881,751.00 

9.00 

112,940.80 

2,357,272.10 

75,980.07 

222,080.45 


$ 8,547 500.00 


188.24 




1,229 218.84 


56,621.07 
91,809.12 


Audited accounts and wages payable 


4,400.117.52 
436.175.33 


1,143,012.50 
9.00 


Interest matured unpaid 


799,965.29 
9.00 


97,000.00 


Funded debt matured unpaid 


97 000 00 


1,937,594.02 


Unmatured interest accrued 


1 217 416 23 


3,402.80 


Unmatured rents accrued 


120 394 30 




Other current liabilities 


260 690 04 




Total current liabilities 




$ 13,798,386.75 


$ 18,306,152.51 


$ 17,108,486.55 




Deferred Liabilities: 








$ 67,129.63 


$ 545,386.68 




$ 603,989.47 


387,633.26 








$ 545,386.68 


$ 603,989.47 


f 454.762.89 




Unadjusted Credits: 
Tax liability 




$ 17 337.58 


$ 410,743.08 
1.041,876.78 


$ 589 270 37 


57 425.92 


Operating reserves 


1,197 863 57 


4 722,375.81 


Accrued depreciation — Road 






Accrued depreciation — Equipment 


5,199,625.98 


5,765.699.93 




U S Government unadjusted credits 


16,047,853.52 


11,521,549.72 


Other unadjusted credits 


18,372,569.45 


1, 151,867.29 




Total unadjusted credits 




$ 16,318,689.03 


$ 25,024,815.29 


$ 24,752,554.68 




Corporate Surplus: 

Additions to property through income and surplus 
Funded debt retired through income and surplus.. 
Appropriated surplus not specifically invested 




$ 120,684.32 

3,896.12 

83 238.21 


$ 134,668.77 
3,896.12 


$ 183.336.61 
3.896.12 




Total appropriated surplus 






$ 207,818.65 


$ 138,564.89 
5,924,343.80 


$ 187,232.73 


6.832,777.20 


Profit and loss, credit balance 


5,763,507.88 




Total corporate surplus 




$ 7,040,595.85 


S 6,062,908.69 


$ 5,950,740.61 


$227,102,727.32 


$244,278,078.93 


$ 244,217.725.45 









SEABOAKD AIR LIXP: EAILWAY 



63 



ROAD OPERATED 



' 


1920-1921 


Name of Road or Track 


Miles of 
Road 


Miles of 

Second 

Main 

Track 


Miles of 
Yard 
Track 

and 

Sidings, 

etc. 


Total 


Main line 


3,402.60 
71.32 


14.47 


998.13 
25.19 


4,415.20 


Branches and spurs 


96.51 


Totals 


3,473.92 


14.47 


1,023.32 


4,511.71 






Proprietary Line: 

Kissimme River Railway 

Industrial Track, Columbia, S. C 


7.25 




1.06 
.35 




Totals - - - 


7.25 




1.41 


8.66 






Leased: 


57.65 




9.63 
5.30 
1.75 








McRae Fer. Co. 












Totals - - 


57.65 




16.68 


74.33 








Contract: 


2.40 
1.46 








Phosphate Min. Co. 
















Total 


3.86 






3.86 










Trackage Rights: 


2.58 

2.84 

.07 

15.04 




.13 
.18 




















5.20 




Chatham Fer. Co. ._. _ _ 








.90 
9.94 


2.05 


















Totals 


20.53 


10.84 


7.56 


38.93 








3,563.21 


25.31 


1,048.97 


4,637.4e 







64 



N. C. COKPORATIO^V COMMISSION 







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1 



SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILWAY 



65 



RAILWAY OPERATING REVENUES-ENTIRE LINE 



Class of Railway Operating Revenues 



1920 



Total 

Amount of 

Revenue for 

the Year 



Comparison 
With Total 
Revenue of 
Preceding 

Year 
Increase 



Total 

Amount of 

Revenue for 

the Year 



Comparison 
With Total 
Revenue of 
Preceding 

Year 
Increase 



Frei gh t 

Passenger 

Excess baggage 

Parlor and chair car.. 

Mail 

Express 

Other passenger-train. 

Milk . 

Switching 

Special service train... 

Other freight-train 

Water transfers 



305,653.41 
150,587.18 

64,308.45 

3,517.72 

935,167.16 

758,910.81 

91,869.94 

17,607.59 
374,187.19 

44,725.06 



$ 7,093,824.33 

1,273,263.78 

2,740.33 

*118.33 

1,351,416.22 

338,274.73 

50,854.27 

*1,545.54 

80,124.35 

72,371.66 



$29, 



72.00 



*348.00 



205,390.25 

754,522.36 

65,017.09 

1,729.46 

076,019.26 

130,680.47 

97,144.50 

20,007.23 

278,066.35 

46,392.41 

568. 14 

1,035.00 



,100,263.16 

,396,064.82 

708.64 

*1,788.26 

*859, 147.90 

628,230.34 

5,274.56 

2.399.64 

*96, 120.84 

1,667.35 

568.14 

963.00 



Total rail-line transportation revenue.. 



Dining and buffet 

Hotel and restaurant 

Station, train, and boat privileges 

Parcel room 

Storage — Freight 

Storage— Baggage 

Demurrage 

Power 

Rents of buildings and other property. 
Miscellaneous 



f47, 746,606.51 

$ 413,190.19 

2,872.77 

42,172.01 

315.35 

230,178.11 

898.12 

211,989.12 

1,785.10 

6,703.58 

517,827.95 



$ 7,714,330.24 



$41,676,572.52 



1*6,070,033.99 



108,214.53 

445.03 

771.59 

*336.50 

5,471.60 

147.33 

18,740.31 

818.59 

13,918.76 

210,502 



300,448.73 

2,847.33 

42,983.93 

290.93 

215,384.42 
1,052.17 

132,161.63 
2,467.67 
7,042.70 

403,487.19 



^112,741.46 
*25.44 
811.92 
*24.42 

*14,793.69 

154.05 

79,827.49 

682.57 

339.12 

^114,340.76 



Total incidental operating revenue. 



Joint facihty — Cr.. 
Joint facility — Dr. 



$ 1,427,932.30 



$ 321,213.61 



$ 1,108,166.70 



♦319,765.60 



$ 59,751.45 
720.46 



$ 15,213.98 
720.46 



$ 60,995.01 
800.93 



% 1,243.56 

80.47 



Total joint facility operating revenue.. 
Total railway operating revenues 



59,030.99 



14,493.52 



60, 194. ( 



1,163. 



$49,233,569. 



$ 8,050,037.37 



142,844,933.30 



$*6,388,636.50 



"Decrease 



X. C. CORPORATION^ COMMISSION 



RAILWAY OPERATING REVENUES— WITHIN THE STATE 





1920 


1921 


Class of Railway Operating Revenues 


On Intrastate 
Traffic 


On Interstate 
Traffic 


On Intrastate 
Traffic 


On Interstate 
Traffic 


Freight 

Passenger 


1 1,684,576.37 

1,245,449.75 

8,496.24 

31.32 

170,394.00 

68,066.01 

12,133.73 

1,540.33 

14,526.49 

7,651.06 


$ 7,794,421.64 

1,693,517.68 

2,831.07 

94.30 

170,394.04 

389,408.05 

4,044.58 

516.43 

63,530.39 

1,522.78 


1 1,574,675.11 

1,093,856.35 

8,435.41 

3.42 

151.415.37 

42,334.03 

12,637.86 

152.86 

9.497.99 

11,631.39 

568.14 


1 7,016,579.67 
1 473 305 58 


Excess baggage 


3 014.10 


Parlor and chair car 

Mail 


■ 15.38 
151,415.37 


Express 


258,158.90 


Other passenger-train 


4,469.29 


Milk 


163.16 


Switching 

Special service train 


44.588.56 
2,119.88 










Total rail-line transportation revenue.,. 


1 3,212,865.30 


$10,120,280.96 


$ 2,905,227.93 


% 8.953.829.89 






$ 95,432.51 
1,856.61 

54,558.17 


$ 5,575.41 
9.00 
9,421.74 
717.29 
6,284.47 
1,296.75 
2,578.04 


8 77,120.60 


Station train and boat privileges 


S 5,569.79 

31.80 

12,479.14 

434.64 

11,970.96 

270. 16 

607.61 


1. 194.06 






Storage— Freight 

Storage — Baggage 


33.824.20 


Demurrage 

Rents of buildings and other property 


50,074.61 
48.041.88 


28.076.09 


Miscellaneous 


28.556.98 


Total incidental operating revenue 


$ 31,364.10 


1 249,963.78 


$ 25,882.70 


$ 169,571.93 




S 552.33 




$ 290.63 










$ 552.33 




.1 290.63 








Total railway operating revenues 


$ 3,244,781.73 


110,370,244.74 


•S 2,931.401.26 


.1 9,123.401.82 



SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILWAY 
RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES 



67 



Name of Railway Operating 
Expense Account 



I. Maintenance of Way and StructurEvS: 

Superintendence 

Roadway mai ntenance — Yard 

Roadway maintenance — Other 

Tunnels and subways— Yard 

Bridges, trestles, and culverts — Yard 

Bridges, trestles, and culverts — Other 

Ties— Yard 

Ties— Other 

Rails — Yard 

Rails— Other 

Other track material— Yard. 

Other track material — Other 

Ballast— Yard 

Ballast— Other 

Track laying and surfacing — Yard 

Track laying and surfacing — Other 

Right-of-way fences — Yard 

Right-of-way fences — Other 

Crossings and signs— Yard 

Crossings and signs — Other 

Station and office buildings 

Roadway buildings .. 

Water stati ons 

Fuel stations 

Shops and enginehouses 

Storage warehouses 

Wharves and docks 

Coal and ore wharves 

Telegraph and telephone lines 

Signals and interlockers 

Power plant dams, canals, and pipe lines. . 

Power plant buildings 

Power substation buildings 

Power transmission systems 

Power distribution systems 

Power line poles and fixtures 

Miscellaneous structures 

Pavi ng 

Roadway machines 

Small tools and supplies 

Removing snow, ice, and sand 

Assessments for public improvements 

Injuries to persons 

Insurance 

Stationery and printing 

Other expenses 



Total 



Amount of Operating Expenses for the Year 
Within the State 



Entire Line 
1920 



478, 

62, 

579. 

33, 

694, 

159, 

1,771, 

12, 

100. 

88, 

175 

1, 

15, 

258, 

2,175 



354, 
64, 

111, 
44, 

101, 
14 

282, 

71 
3 



870.84 
235.67 
828.30 
156.87 
583.11 
649.70 
935.38 
715.23 
675.45 
726.93 
393.29 
914.25 
729.05 
600.08 
956.88 
694.43 

67.45 
807.59 
312.27 
610.93 
781.23 
052.44 
116.01 
427.46 
409.37 
925.21 
306.26 

86.42 
947.96 
639.28 



2,812.33 

30.00 

108.05 

1,563.21 

2,701.96 

22,250.56 

3,856.66 

68,954.37 

106,714.83 

3,501.22 

122.97 

26,468.14 

71,035.49 

21,455.03 

1,679.36 



1921 



$ 8,081,432.34 



421, 

36, 

310, 

7, 

331, 

138, 

1,199, 

14, 

46, 

71, 

171, 



162 



234.95 
682.98 

42.79 
496.95 
781.00 
352.87 
395.71 
209.56 
075.86 
588.10 
883.82 
492.48 
336.49 
609.41 
068.50 

63.06 
218.41 
944.56 
232.03 
933.77 
183.23 
204.88 
374.72 
117.48 
574.38 
067.15 



63,762.11 

1,535.34 

15.00 

54.98 



305.59 

1,909.45 

1,326.75 

1,074.97 

1,980.70 

34,015.04 

68,853.82 

6,542.92 

341.55 

10,856.96 

71,660.63 

17,300.27 

606.52 



$ 4,907,985.33 



1920 



87,866.23 
15,058.84 
107,336.55 



97.97 

80,416.85 

40,470.55 

349,002.91 

8,859.91 

18,163.57 

19,526.55 

38,436.51 

105.40 

5,146.52 

49,261.69 

400,249.87 

2.52 

129. 97 

2,526.27 

13,868.93 

104,364.47 

10,426.13 

22,689.54 

11,727.67 

23,335.20 

1,906.50 

27,418.47 



11,167.20 
865.33 



11.75 

18.44 

35.60 

615.56 

516.33 

537.88 

449.94 

11,542.62 

18,628.13 

1,657.30 

122.97 

4,601.28 

14,. 304. 71 

4,191.84 

12.57 



$ 1,506,372.74 



1921 



72,456.70 

7,010.45 

57,947.53 

1.92 

250.25 

34,922.24 

40,085.63 

234,962.86 

5,112.43 

24,205.11 

22,677.51 

50,570.52 

165.16 

745.45 

45,292.16 

244,963.68 



11.58 

4,422.81 

13,837.73 

34,462.37 

1,597.53 

11,639.81 

5,817.83 

10,582.88 

30.01 

267.30 



9,911.35 
241.76 



12.12 



1.56 

346.07 

449.81 

4.22 

.61 

5,205.84 

7.234.27 

5,219.11 

48.09 

5,491.84 

14,296.02 

3,723.66 

96.79 



976,298.19 



68 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 
RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES— Con<i«uerf 



• 


Amount of Operating Expenses for the Year 


Name of Railway Operating 
Expense Account 


Entire Line 


Within the State 




1920 


1921 


1920 


1921 


I. Maintenance of Way and Structures 
— Continued 
Maintaining joint tracks, yards, and other 
facilities— Dr. 


S 182,812.62 
28,493.58 


$ 116,746.13 
21,211.57 


$ 13,453.30 
11,156.64 


$ 6 667.58 


Maintaining joint tracks, yards, and other 
facilities— Cr. 


12,807.36 






Total maintenance of way and structures 


$ 8,235,751.38 


% 5,003,619.89 


$ 1,508,669.40 


$ 970,158.41 


II. Maintenance of Equipment: 
Superintendence 

Shop machinery 


$ 447,114.25 

226,998.25 

39,520.24 

5,414,708.88 

297,608.22 

16,792.45 


$ 387,000.57 

105,139.08 

23,579.03 

2,974,611.76 

259,031.46 

116,613.75 


% 101,270.93 

51.665.55 

8,960.93 

1.232,584.36 

66,588.23 

3,943.19 

30.45 

773,289.79 

75,050.48 

3,781.42 

262,763.69 

17,197.08 

541.37 


$ 92,624.45 
25 250.56 


Power plant machinery 

Steam locomotives— Repairs 

Steam locomotives — Depreciation 


5,585.61 
714,850.15 
61,327.20 


Steam locomotives— Retirements 

Other locomotives — Repairs 


24,051.54 
13.47 


Freight-train cars — Repairs 


3,057,227.89 

297,210.68 

14,813.62 

1,024,596.38 

65,885.00 

1,864.56 

2,359.44 

537.30 

23.02 

85,405.70 

7,768.18 


2,834,702.83 
285,939.69 

38,258.94 
740,079.96 

65,730.18 


764,178.72 


Freight-train cars — Depreciation 


77,306.93 


Freight-train cars — Retirements 


10,506.94 


Passenger-train cars— Repairs 

Passenger-train cars— Depreciation 


208,413.77 
18,510.67 




2,769.46 
9,355.24 


.01 
















33,906.88 

115.15 

42.58 

56,925.03 

23,156.75 

482.39 

138.10 

136.35 

762.00 

36,569.98 

48,568.56 

23,973.44 

62.20 


183.79 


10,275.58 


Floating equipment— Depreciation 


576.30 
24.70 




292,535.14 

25,544.50 

13,111.79 

3,971.21 

100.97 


52,656.33 

4,598.01 

2,360.11 

9.02 

11.60 


10,246.45 




4,168.22 




86.83 


Miscellaneous equipment— Repairs 

Miscellaneous equipment— Depreciation .. 
Miscellaneous equipment — Retirements 


4.54 
41.36 
442.00 


Injuries to persons 

Insurance 


52,045.92 
50,680.95 
28,607.63 
3,012.89 


11,796.46 

12,888.11 

6,333.37 

702.68 


8,634.59 
13,084.25 


Stationery and printing 


5,638.43 


Other expenses 


14.52 


Total. 


$11,440,417.82 

23,733.63 

2,118.01 


$ 7,824,387.24 

25,194.27 

1,167.48 


$ 2,681,565.17 

688.76 

1,316.73 


$ 2,007,522.55 


Maintaining joint equipment at terminals 
— Dr 


38.84 


Maintaining joint equipment at terminals 
— Cr 


874.55 






Total maintenance of equipment 


$11,462,033.44 


$ 7,848,414.03 


$ 2,680,937.20 


$ 2,006,686.84 



SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILWAY 



69 



RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES— Con^mwed 



Name of Railway Operating 
Expense Account 



Amount of Operating Expense? for the Year 



Entire Line 



1920 



1921 



Within the State 



1920 



1921 



III. Tkaffic: 

Superintendence 

Outside agencies 

Advertising 

Traffic associations 

Industrial and immigration bureaus . 

Insurance 

Stationery and printing 

Other expenses . 



TotaL 



IV. Transportation — Rail Line: 

Superintendence 

Dispatching trains 

Stati on employees 

Weighing, inspection, demurrage bureaus 

Coal and ore wharves 

Station supplies and expenses 

Yardmasters and yard clerks 

Yard conductors and brakemen 

Yard switch and signal tenders 

Yard enginemen 

Fuel for yard locomotives 

Water for yard locomotives 

Lubricants for yard locomotives 

Other supplies for yard locomotives 

Enginehouse expenses — Yard 

Yard supplies and expenses 

Train enginemen 

Train motormen 

Fuel for train locomotives 

Water for train locomotives 

Lubricants for train locomotives 

Other supplies for train locomotives ..- 

Enginehouse expenses — Train 

Trainmen 

Train supplies and expenses _. 

Operating sleeping cars 

Signal and interlocker operation 

Crossing protection 

Drawbridge operation 

Telegraph and telephone operation 

Operating floating equipment 

Stationery and printing 

Other expenses 

Insurance 

Clearing wrecks 

Damage to property 

Damage to livestock on right of way._. 

Loss and damage — Freight 

Loss and damage — Baggage 

Injuries to persons 



Total. 



531,018.94 

382,423.26 

35,343.98 

43,016.20 

111,965.56 

396.26 

251,228.60 

222. 



450,085.67 

579,583.54 

74,541.57 

23,080.35 

83,694.55 

463.76 

248,797.70 

245.21 



118,321.21 

84,722.72 

8,285.64 

9,507.46 

24,938.92 

89.28 

55,644.31 

49.80 



106,711.43 

137,681.81 

17,902.03 

5,489.56 

19,620.71 

111.75 

59,560.82 

60.00 



$ 1,355, 615. I 



$1,460,462.35$ 301,559.34$ 347,138.11 



667 

288 

4,058 

78 

230 

527 

1,047 

28 

629 

837 

38 

14 

15 

290 

40 

2,193 

5 

5,814 

259 

122 

98 

958 

2,895, 

749 

56 
104 

76 
239 

64, 

139. 

5, 

76, 

168, 

132, 

396, 

1,144, 

13, 
476, 



,265.84 
,763.17 
,431.67 
,674.65 
344.03 
,205.17 
,712.15 
,658.04 
.824.86 
,426.51 
,013.37 
,043.14 
,999.95 
,420.91 
,470.81 
,800.72 
,982.16 
,259.84 
,493.96 
,607.47 
,401.21 
,265.89 
,371.76 
,265.84 
,243.10 
1.46 
,593.75 
,288.46 
,211.12 
,397.23 
,930.81 
,847.63 
,777.21 
,192.26 
,665.23 
974.14 
849.90 
476.56 
667.45 
574.29 



$ 545,778.32 

292.441.27 

3,072,613.28 

82,495.27 



178 
448 
839 
22 
499 
648 
33 
8 

10 

213 

29, 

1,885, 

3, 

4,896 

246, 

111 

63, 

731, 

2,395, 

573, 



,908.34 
,633.00 
,809.50 
,367.48 
,124.33 
,653.02 
,400.90 
,107.16 
,634.46 
,107.34 
,455.13 
,942.99 
,276.35 
,278.01 
,072.50 
,378.72 
039.83 
420.30 
016.12 
634.30 



15,298.14 
98,673.33 
63,916.63 

164,702.83 
60,749.95 
97,327.40 
30,299.96 
61,464.16 
77,855.08 
98,817.47 

192,257.01 

1,065,916.05, 

395.70 

293,822.52 



130,186.54 

75,137.95 

926,893.17 

11,697 

2 

56,664.05 

140,229.76 

308,218.15 

14,557.54 

156,282.64 

215,708.38 

9,465.07 

3,994.57 

4,050.20 

86,366.82 

9,642.28 

500,939.55 



,395,830.37 
68,346.36 
26,077.85 
21,512.72 
267,155.23 
620,438.42 
172,291.19 



$24,987,393.72 



16,144.18 

28,968.93 

330.41 

118,909.62 

448.01 

31,570.13 

1,428.94 

16,797.93 

37,740.36 

40,736.02 

50,294.78 

259,311.31 

3,666.26 

101,401.82 



$20,152,292.75 $ 5,929,437.37 



94,377.87 

83,642.60 

667,292.38 

10,301.91 



38,482.68 

124,618.91 

270,407.79 

9.200.85 

138,823.56 

184,195.27 

8,082.31 

1.975.92 

3,001.77 

61,150.38 

6,633.40 

472,404.60 



1,237,127.97 

62,030.13 

29,678.08 

15,290.52 

195,730.09 

580,151.33 

136,551.14 



2,251.90 

28,690.90 

322.64 

57,666.43 

1,613.71 

23,988.98 

6.950.01 

14,629.59 

15,945.72 

25,139.31 

20,466.67 

233,561.94 

28.17 

55,083.42 



$ 4,917,434.51 



70 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 
RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES— Conhnuerf 





Amoufit of Operating Expenses for the Year 


Name of Railway Operating 
Expense Account 


Entire Line 


Within the State 


• 


1920 . 


1921 


1920 


1921 


IV. Tr-\nsport.\tion— Ra.l Line—Coii- 
tinued 
Operating joint yards and terminals— Dr. 
Operating joint yards and terminals— Cr. 
Operating joint tracks and facilities— Dr. 
Operating joint tracks and facilities— Cr. 


$ 658,064.41 

220,302.99 

78,749.28 

96,708.55 


$ 507,812.16 
115,239.07 
77,322.51 
66,537.17 


1 70,238.41 
85,303.86 
15,562.62 
34,319.66 


1 44,341.17 
67,966.70 
17,232.98 
24.018.71 




$25,407,195.87 


$20,555,651.18 


$ 5,895,614.88 


$ 4,887,023.25 






V. Miscellaneous Operations: 

Dining and buffet service 


S 474,681.12 
1,833.02 
2,138.14 


$ 387,181.60 
1,658.53 
3,652.88 


$ 109,395.20 
208.53 
229.26 


$ 100.556.85 
451.47 


Producing power sold 


978.18 


Total miscellaneous operations 


$ 478,652.28 


$ 392,493.01 


$ 109,832.99 


% 101 986 50 






VI. General: 
Salaries and expenses of general officers... 
Salaries and expenses of clerks and 
attendants 

General office supplies and expenses 

Law expenses 


% 187,263.65 

1,234,792.65 

79,992.93 

207,924.94 

2,173.82 

6,373.97 

88,830.34 

73,010.78 

90,238.55 


$ 164,014.43 

1,120,763.53 
56,045.00 
223,085.27 
2,236.79 
9,405.44 
54,926.06 
98,533.75 
26,993.06 


$ 41,796.29 

274,125.23 
18,005.50 
42,934.94 
485.22 
1,415.22 
19,985.60 
13,141.96 
20,194.55 


$ 38,949.13 

265,611.92 
13,350.90 
44,607.57 


Insurance 


530.68 


Pensions 


2,238.51 
12,995.44 




17,736.07 




6,770.77 






Total of accounts ^ 

General joint facilities — Dr 


% 1,970,601.63 

15,039.75 

192.88 


$ 1,756,003.33 

20,424.35 

143.74 


$ 432.084.51 
380. 16 
103.03 


% 402,790.99 
484 09 


General joint facilities — Cr 


3.29 






Total general expenses 


$ 1,985.834.26 


$ 1,776,283.94 


$ 432,567.70 


$ 403,278.37 


VII. Transportation for Invest.— Cr 

Grand total Railway Operating Exp 


$ 360.18 
48,924,722.74 


$ 12,123.05 
37,024,801.35 


$10,929,181.51 


$ 422.98 
8,715,848.50 



Operating ratio (ratio of operating expenses to operating revenues), 1920, 99.37 per rent; 1921, 72.30 
per cent 



SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILWAY 
STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— ENTIRE LINE 



71 



Item 


1920 


1921 


Average mileage of road operated miles 


3,563.21 


3,563.21 


TRArX-MILE.s: 


4,895,072 
125,436 


4,296,684 




99,482 






'F'rpio-ht — total - 


5,020,508 

6,655,918 

601,966 

8,708 


4,396,166 




6,797,835 


Mixed - 


563,725 


Special - - -- 


10,572 






Total transportation service 


12,287,100 


11,768,298 






Work service - 


292,141 


128,616 






L0C0M0TIVE-MILEf> : 

Freight — principal - 


5,020,508 
111,111 
93,612 


4,396,166 


Freight — helper ' -- 


85,419 


Frci""ht — light - -- 


68,231 






Frei°'ht — total - 


5,225,231 


4,549,816 






Passenger — principal 


6,612,501 
55,223 
137,277 


6,765,532 


Passenger — helper - - 


47,198 


Passeno'er — hght - 


137,203 






Passenger — total - -- - 


6,805,001 


6,949.933 






Alixed train — principal - - 


601,966 

98 

22,105 


563,725 


Mixed train — helper - - 


42 


Mixed train — light 


20,269 






Mixed train — total 


624,169 


584,036 






Special — principal 


8,708 


10,572 






Special — total 


8,708 


10,572 






Train switching 


279.868 


304,823 




2,218,726 
174,497 


1,757,223 




147,228 








2,393,223 


1,904,451 








15,336,200 


14,303,631 






Work service -».-■- 


387,118 


241,681 


Car-miles: 

Freight train— loaded 

Freight train— empty . 


119,601,539 
47,714,379 


98,598,946 
48,314,563 


Sum of loaded and empty 


167,315,918 
5,128,406 


146 913 509 


Freight train — caboose 


4 473 034 


Freight train — exclusive work equipment 


167 992 










172,444,324 


151,554,535 







72 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— ENTIRE LlNE~Co7itinued 



Item 



Car-miles — Continued 

Passenger train — passenger 

Passenger train — sleeping, parlor, and observation. 

Passenger train — dining 

Passenger train — other 



Passenger train — total. 



Mixed train — freight — loaded 

Mixed train — freight — empty 

Mixed train — passenger 

Mixed train — sleeping, parlor, and observation. 
Mixed train — other passenger-train 



Mixed train — total. 



Special train — freight — loaded 

Special train — caboose 

Special train — passenger 

Special train — sleeping, parlor and observation. 
Special train — other passengef-train 



Special train — total 

Total transportation service. 
Work service 



Freight Service: 

Tons — revenue freight 

Tons — nonrevenue freight . 

Tons— total 



Ton-miles — revenue freight 

Ton-miles — nonrevenue freight . 



Ton-miles — total. 



P.\ssenger Service: 
Passengers carried — revenue. 
Passenger-miles — revenue. .. 



Revenues and Expenses: 

Freight revenue.. 

Passenger revenue 

Passenger service train revenue- 



Operating revenues- 
Operating expenses. 



Net operating revenues- 



AVERAGES per MiLE OF ROAD : 

Freight-train miles 

Passenger-train miles 

Mixed-train miles 

Special-train miles 



1920 



12,843,761 
10,312.097 
1,512,482 
12,446,055 



37,114,395 



2,794,438 

1,413.639 

829,889 



160,262 



5,198,228 



71,000 
6,170 
12,690 



214,846.807 



2.333.491 



12,931,210 
1,740,641 



14,671,851 



2,533,255,969 
304,780,031 



2,838,036,000 



6,322,576 
378,877,961 



$32,305,653.41 
11,150,587.18 
15,021,968.85 



$49,233,569.80 
48,924,722.74 



$ 308,847. 



1,409 

1,869 

169 

2 



1921 



12.946,314 

10.080.512 

1,618,565 

15.118.391 



39.763,782 



2.580,335 

1.494,773 

768,499 

2,957 

580 

4.847,144 



84,285 

7,442 

17,4.54 

104 

52 

109,337 

196,274,798 



985,959 



9,878.529 
1,452,251 



11.330,780 



1,858,505,148 
225,247,852 



2,083,753,000 



4,478.329 
280,511,052 



% 29,205,390.25 
9,754,522.36 
12,145,120.37 



$ 42,844,933.30 
37,024,801.35 



$ 5.820,131.95 



1.234 

1,908 

158 

3 



SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILWAY 
STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— ENTIRE LINE— Continued 



73 



Item 



1920 



1921 



Averages per Mile of Road— Continued 

Transportation service train-miles 

Work-train miles 

Locomotive-miles— transportation 

Freight service car-miles 

Passenger service car-miles 

Freight revenue 

Passenger service train revenue 

Operating revenues 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenues 

Ton-miles— revenue freight 

Ton- miles— all freight 

Passenger-miles— revenue 



Averages per Train-mile: 

Loaded freight car-miles— freight trains 

Loaded freight car- miles — mixed tra.ns 

Empty freight car-miles — freight trains 

Empty freight car-miles — mixed trains 

Ton-miles— revenue freight 

Ton-miles— all freight 

Passenger train car-miles — passenger trains. 

Passenger train car-miles— mixed trains 

Revenue passenger-miles 

Freight revenue 

Passenger service train revenue 

Operating revenues 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenues 



Averages per Locomotive-mile: 

Train-miles— freight trains 

Car-miles— freight trains 

Train-miles— passenger trains.... 

Car-miles— passenger trains 

Train-miles — mixed trains 

Car-miles — mixed trains 

Train-miles- special trains 

Car-miles— special trains 



Averages per Loaded Freight Car-mile: 

Ton-miles — revenue freight 

Ton-miles — all freight 

Freight revenue 



Averages per Car-mile — Passenger: 

Passenger- miles — revenue 

Passenger revenue 

Miscellaneous Averages: 

Miles hauled — revenue freight 

Miles hauled — nonrevenue freight 

Miles hauled— all freight 

Miles carried — revenue passengers 

Revenue per ton of freight 

Revenue per ton-mile of freight 

Revenue per passenger 

Revenue per passenger- mile 

Operating ratio 



3,448 


3,303 


82 


36 


4,304 


4,014 


49,598 


43,703 


10,697 


11,381 


9,066.45 


$ 8,196.37 


4,215.85 


3,408.48 


13,817.20 


12,024.25 


13,730.52 


10,390.86 


86.68 


1,633.39 


710,948 


521,582 


796,483 


584,797 


106,331 


78,724 


23.82 


22.43 


4.64 


4.58 


9.50 


10.99 


2.35 


2.65 


450.56 


383.79 


504.77 


430.30 


5.58 


5.85 


1.64 


1.37 


52.20 


40.56 


5.75 


$ 6.03 


2.07 


1.76 


4.00 


3.64 


3.98 


3.15 


.02 


.49 


.96 


.97 


33.00 


33.31 


.98 


.98 


5.45 


5.72 


.96 


.97 


8.33 


8.30 


1.00 


1.00 


10.32 


10.34 


20.70 


18.37 


23.19 


20.59 


263.94 


$ 288.65 


15.80 


11.79 


464.88 


$ 409.88 


195.90 


188.14 


175.10 


155. 10 


193.43 


183.90 


59.92 


62.64 


2.49827 


$ 2.95645 


.01275 


.01571 


1.76361 


2.17816 


.02943 


.03477 


99.37 


% 86.42 



16- 



•74 



N. C. COKPdKATION COMMISSION 
STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— WITHIN THE STATE 



Item 


1920 


1921 


Average mileage of road operated miles 


627.30 


627.30 


Train-miles: 

Freight — ordinary 


1,102,959 
16,259 


1,057,554 




12,962 






Freight— tot al . 


1,119,218 

1,542,732 

112,454 

1,589 


1,070,516 




1,644,187 


Mixed 


92,206 


Special 


2.382 






Total transportation service 


2,775,993 


2,809,291 








75,427 


40,198 






Locomotive-miles : 
Freight — principal 


1,119,218 
30,109 

34,629 


1,070,516 


Freight — helper 


24,900 




15,452 






Freight— total . - 


1,183,956 


1,110,868 








1,542,732 
14,568 
17,285 


1,644,187 




14,056 


Passenger — light 


13,422 






Passenger — total 


1,574,585 


1,671,665 








— 

112,454 

84 

5,059 


92.206 


Mixed train — helper - 


42 




6,707 








117,597 


98,955 








1,589 


2,382 








1,589 


2,382 






Train switching 


67,050 


62,953 






Yard switching — freight - 


515,383 

77,508 


442,388 




75,747 








592,891 


518,135 








3,537,668 


3,464,958 








92,959 


57,631 






Car-miles: 


33,331.248 
9,672,055 


28,160,275 




12,151,729 






Sum of loaded and empty - - 


43,003,303 
1,161,590 


40,312,004 


Freight train — caboose 


1,091,396 




68,507 










44,164,893 


41,471,907 







SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILWAY 75 

STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— WITHIN THE STATE— Continued 



Item 



Car-miles — Continued 

Passenger train— passenger 

Passenger train— sleeping, parlor, and observation. 

Passenger train — dining 

Passenger train— other 



Passenger train— total- 



Mixed train — freight — loaded 

Mixed train— freight— empty 

Mixed train — passenger 

Mixed train — sleeping, parlor, and observation. 
Mixed train— other passenger-train 



Mixed train — total. 



Special train— freight— loaded 
Special train- 



Special train — total 

Total transportation service. 
Work service 



Freight Service: 
Tons — revenue freight . 



Tons— total 

Ton-miles — revenue freight. 



Passenger Service: 
Passengers carried — revenue . 
Passenger-miles— revenue 



Revenues and Expenses: 

Freight revenue 

Passenger revenue 

Passenger service train revenue. 



Operating revenues. 
Operating expenses. 



Net operating revenues. 



Averages per Mile of Road: 

Freight-train miles 

Passenger-train miles 

Mixed-train miles 

Special-train miles 

Transportation service train-miles. 

Work-train miles 

Locomotive-miles— transportation. 

Freight service car-miles 

Passenger service car-miles 

Freight revenue. _ 



1920 



3,030,235 

2,787,882 

347,782 

3,627,447 



9,793,346 



343,015 
106,234 
172,860 



72,858 



$ 9,478,998.01 
2,938,967.43 
3,766,917.53 



$13,615,026.47 
10,929,181.51 



$ 2,685,844. 



1,784 

2,459 

179 

3 

4,425 

120 

5,640 

71,145 

16,004 

15,110.79 



1921 



3,138,256 

2,672,182 

428,955 

4,862,981 



11,102,374 



301,405 

108,125 

150,469 

700 

230 



694,967 


560,929 


13,532 
1,589 


29,835 
2,382 


15,121 


32,217 


54,668,327 


53,167,427 


786,970 


402,023 


5,301,469 


3,948,083 


5,301,469 


3,948,083 


602,777,919 


469,388,821 


1,666,450 
99,861,110 


1,178,592 
73,823,943 



$ 8,591,274.78 
2,567,161.93 
3,199,377.08 



$ 12,054,803.08 
8,715,846.30 



$ 3,338,956.78 



1,706 

2,621 

147 

4 

4,478 

64 

5,524 

66,816 

18,040 

13,695.64 



76 N. C. COKPOKATION COMMISSION 

STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS-WITHIN THE STATE— Continued 



Item 



Averages per Mii,e of Road — Continued 

Passenger service train revenue 

Operating revenues 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenues 

Ton- miles — revenue freight 

Passenger-miles — revenue 

Averages per Train-mile: 

Loaded freight car-miles^freight trains 

Loaded freight car-miles — mixed trains 

Empty freight car-miles — freight trains 

Empty freight car-miles— mixed trains 

Ton-miles— revenue freight 

Passenger train car-miles — passenger trains 

Passenger train car-miles — mixed trains 

Revenue passenger-miles 

Freight revenue 

Passenger service train revenue 

Operating revenues 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenues 

Averages per Locomotive-mile: 

Train-miles — freight trains 

Car-miles — freight trains 

Train-miles — passenger trains 

Car-miles — passenger trains 

Train-miles — mixed trains 

Car-miles — mixed trains 

Train-miles — special trains 

Car-miles — special trains 

Averages per Loaded Freight Car-mile: 

Ton-miles — revenue freight 

Freight revenue 

Averages per Car-mile — Passenger: 

Passenger-miles — revenue 

Passenger revenue 

Miscellaneous Averages: 

Miles hauled — revenue freight 

Miles carried — revenue passengers 

Revenue per ton of freight 

Revenue per ton-mile of freight 

Revenue per passenger 

Revenue per passenger-mile 

Operati ng ratio 



1920 



6.004.97 


21,704.17 


17.422.58 


4,281.59 


960,909 


159,192 


29.78 


3.05 


8.64 


.94 


489.40 


6.35 


2.19 


60.33 


7.70 


2.28 


4.90 



.95 
37.30 

.98 
6.22 

.96 
5.91 
1.00 
9.52 



17.90 

,28149 



16.67 
.49057 



113.70 

59.92 
1.78799 
.01572 
1.76361 
.02943 
80.27 



SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILWAY 



Y7 



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78 



N. C. COKPORATION COMMISSION 
EMPLOYEES AND THEIR COMPENSATION 



Class of Employees 



1920 



Average 
Number of 
Employees 
in Service 



Total 
Compensa- 
tion during 

Year 



1921 



Average 
Number of 
Employees 
in Service 



Total 
Compensa- 
tion during 
Year 



General officers, $3,000 per annum and upwards 

General officers, below $3,000 per annum 

Division officers, $3,000 per annum and upwards 

Division officers, below $3,000 per annum 

Clerks, $900 per annum and upwards 

Clerks, below $900 per annum 

Messengers and attendants 

Assistant engineers and draftsmen 

Maintenance of way and section foremen 

Section foremen 

General forernen— M. E. department 

Gang and other foremen— M. E department... 

Machinists 

Boiler makers 

Blacks miths . 

Masons and bricklayers 

Carpenters 

Painters and upholsterers 

Electricians 

Air-brake men 

Car inspectors 

Car repairers 

Other skilled laborers 

Mechanics' helpers and apprentices 

Secti on men 

Other unskilled laborers 

Foremen of construction gangs and work trains 

Other men in const gangs and work trains 

Traveling agents and solicitors 

Other traffic employees : 

Train dispatchers and directors 

Telegraphers, telephoners, and block operators 
Telegraphers and telephoners operating inter- 
lockers 

Levermen (nontelegraphers). ... 

Telegrapher-clerks 

A gent-telegraphers 

Station agents (nontelegraphers) 

Station masters and assistants 

Station service employees 

Y ardmasters 

Yardmaster's assistants (not yard clerics) 

Yard engineers and motormen 

Yard firemen and helpers 

Yard conductors (or foremen) 

Yard brakemen (switchmen or helpers) 

Yard switch tenders ^. 

Other yard employees 

Hostlers 

Enginehouse-men 

Road freight engineers and motormen 

Road freight firemen and helpers 

Road freight conductors 



83 

26 

63 

47 

2,065 

57 

120 

62 

82 

482 

14 

154 

422 

122 

81 

2 

505 

62 

56 

30 

195 

521 

345 

1,079 

2,861 

1,173 

36 

411 

87 

6 

59 

235 



102 

312 

193 

1 

1,634 

42 

9 

153 

157 

146 

331 

8 

34 

123 

600 

239 

254 

241 



514, 

53, 

242, 

120, 

3,507, 

33, 

106, 

125, 

138, 

747, 

50, 

423, 

882, 

270, 

154, 

3, 

669, 

106, 

124, 

59, 

428, 

974, 

692, 

1,523, 

2,076, 

1,194. 

57, 

263, 

217, 

13, 

178, 

392, 



209.98 
991.76 
403.52 
771.23 
307.69 
577.22 
146.57 
464.90 
224.94 
849.06 
018.80 
761.57 
356.30 
834.66 
516.20 
622.52 
495.75 
053.31 
240. 12 
450.91 
756.85 
090.99 
784.08 
259.64 
893.80 
696. 18 
624.24 
166.48 
455.09 
125.75 
269.90 
889.93 



13,497.98 

9,556.45 

159,433.82 

557,711.75 

373,215.58 

3,252.93 

,392,672.51 

131,219.30 

23,899.18 

358,056.39 

271,947.08 

320.535.20 

697.012.95 

9,030.51 

41,001.31 

228,991.39 

823,942.46 

819,605.97 

598,011.24 

695,310.01 



22 

92 

19 

1,850 

48 

125 

33 

45 

487 

14 

107 

215 

82 

39 

3 

188 

31 

65 

23 

161 

447 

224 

554 

2,200 

809 

10 

127 

90 

6 

55 

212 



289 

191 

1 

1,047 

39 

5 

128 

130 

123 

273 

3 

28 

124 

598 

184 

182 

183 



288, 

24, 

165, 

28, 

1,722, 

15, 

51, 

42, 

40, 

398, 

27, 

162, 

266, 

103, 

44. 

1, 

142, 

28, 

62, 

24, 

194, 

462, 

228, 

444, 

694, 

450. 

9, 

50, 

134, 

6, 

80, 

181, 



595.96 
890.68 
311.40 
001.98 
111.34 
018.54 
008.28 
364.01 
023.07 
251.06 
914.97 
679.94 
256.32 
400.29 
469.08 
613.05 
023.78 
780.01 
545.95 
586. 73 
380.49 
880.81 
591.36 
519.03 
917.19 
028.00 
380.75 
397.72 
167.20 
078.00 
354.36 
679.79 



8.425.90 

5.386.12 

91.774.81 

295.694.06 

170.376.70 

1.638.28- 

405.970.49 

65,878.71 

7,884.95 
165,328.64 
134,764.31 
159.626.04 
322,600.10 

2,734.20 
24,165.47 
112,336.03 
374,874.48 
352,756.57 
263,175.71 
302.498.03 



SEABOABD AIR LINE RAILWAY 
EMPLOYEES AND THEIR COMPENSATION— Co^hn^^ed 



Class of Employees 



Road freight brakemen and flagmen 

Road passenger engineers and motornien. 

Road passenger firemen and helpers 

R oad passenger conductors 

Road passenger baggagemen 

Road passenger brakemen and flagmen.. _ 

Other road train employees 

Crossing flagmen and gatemen 

Drawbri dge operators 

Floating equipment employees 

Policemen and watchmen 

Other transportation employees 

All other employees 

Total 





1920 




921 


Average 
Number of 
Employees 
in Service 


Total 
Compensa- 
tion during 

Year 


Average 
Number of 
Employees 
in Service 


Total 
Compensa- 
tion during 

Year 


578 


$ 1,247,882.56 


423 


$ 547,718.51 


120 


438,699.68 


124 


240.608.41 


120 


323.538.12 


125 


180,470.34 


124 


333,217.21 


122 


180,278.44 


106 


203,024.98 


107 


112.752.87 


108 


217,131.26 


116 


130,812.14 


107 


117,809.53 


116 


62, 247. "06 


100 


77,956.80 


108 


44,886.86 


67 


63,734.93 


62 


36,510.96 


21 


33,«37.94 


23 


14,654.38 


133 


206.209.72 


113 


98,460.39 


10 


9,376.36 


22 


12 386.52 


238 


216,015.27 


248 


128,762.24 


17,971 


$27,363,648.31 


13,824 


*] 1.635. 059. 86 



80 



N. C. COKPOKATION COMMISSION 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY COMPANY 

PRINCIPAL GENERAL OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President 


Fairfax Harrison 

L. E. Jeffries 

H. W. Miller 


Washington, D. C.- 
Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D C 


Vice President 
Vice President 


and General Counsel 




L . Green 

F. S. Wynn 


Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 










R. B. Pegram 


Atlanta, Ga. 




C. E. A. McCarthy 


New York, N. Y. 


Treasurer 

Comptroller 


E. F. Parham 

E. H. Kemper 


Washington, D. C. 
Washington D C 







DIRECTORS 

Guy Gary, New York, N. Y..; Fairfax Harrison, Washington, D. C; H. W. Miller, Washington, 
D. C; Adrian Iselin, New York, N. Y.; Charles Lanier, New York, N. Y.; J, Kerr Branch, Richmond, 
Va.; E. A. Alderman, Charlottesville, Va.; Robert Jamison, Birmingham,*Ala.; John C. Kilgo, Char- 
lotte, N. C; Geo. T. Slade, New York, N. Y.; Devereux Milburn, New York, N. Y.; Casper G. Bacon, 
Boston, Mass. 

HISTORY 

1. Exact name of common carrier making this report. Southern Railway Company. 

2. Date of organization, June 18, 1894. 

3. Under laws of what State organized? Organized under and by virtue of an act of the General 
Assembly of the State of Virginia, approved February 20, 1894. 

4. If a consolidated or a merging company, name all constituent and all merged companies: 
Not a consolidated company except as noted below respecting the Virginia Midland and Knoxville, 
Cumberland Gap and Louisville Railway, and Carolina and Cumberland Gap Railway companies. 

The Southern Railway Company was organized by the purchasers of the property formerly of the 
Richmond and Danville Railroad Company. Under its charter it has power to acquire various other 
railroad properties, and on various dates since its organization it has purchased, in addition to the 
Richmond and Danville Railroad proper, under foreclosure sale or otherwise, and now owns the 
following properties: 

Piedmonifc R. R., Western North Carohna R. R., Northwestern North Carolina R. R., Atlantic, 
Tennessee and Ohio R. R., Oxford and Clarksville R. R., Oxford and Henderson R. R., Clarksville 
and North Carolina R. R., Charlotte, Columbia and Augusta R. R., Columbia and Greenville R. R., 
that part of the Georgia Pacific Ry. which lies in the States of Georgia and Alabama, East Tennessee, 
Virginia and Georgia Ry., Atlanta and Florida Ry., that part of the Memphis and Charleston R. R. 
which lies in the States of Tennessee and Alabama, Northeastern R. R. of Georgia, Knoxville Belt 
R. R., SouthernRailway Company in Illinois, and certain subordinate lines of some of the above named 
companies. 

It has also acquired by consolidation the property and franchises of the following companies: 
The Virginia Midland Ry., acquired by deed dated June 21, 1898; the Knoxville, Cumberland Gap 
and Louisville Ry., acquired by deed dated June 29, 1898; the Carolina and Cumberland Gap Ry., 
acquired by deed dated September 1, 1898 ; the Knoxville and Ohio R. R., acquired by deed dated Decem- 
ber 31, 1903; the Knoxville and Bristol Ry., acquired by deed dated December 31, 1903. 

It also holds under lease the property of the following named companies: Georgia Midland Ry., 
Atlanta and Charlotte Air Line Ry. Co., North Carolina R. R. Co., Southern Railway — Carolina 
Division, Mobile and Birmingham R. R. Co., Richmond and Mecklenburg R. R. Co., Atlantic and 
Danville Ry. Co., Lockhart R. R. Co. 

5. Date and authority for each consolidation and for each merger: See pages 28 and 29 of the 
First Consolidated Mortgage Deed, dated October 4, 1894, and filed with the report of this company 
for the year ending June 30, 1895, for date and authority for each of the above mentioned purchases, 
except the Atlantic and Florida Railway, which was purchased by deed dated June 21, 1895; the Mem- 
phis and Charleston Railroad which was acquired by deed dated February 26, 1898; the Georgia Mid- 
land Ry., which was leased by an instrument dated June 18, 1896; the Virginia Midland Ry., deeded 



SOUTHERN EAILWAY 81 

June 21, 1898; the Knoxville, Cumberland Gap and Louisville Ry., deeded June 29, 1898; the Carolina 
and Cumberland Gap Ry., deeded September 1, 1898; the Knoxville Belt R. R., acquired by deed dated 
January 13, 1899; Northeastern Railroad of Georgia, at sale October 31, 1899. 

6. If a reorganized company, give name of original corporation, refer to laws under which it was 
organized and state the occasion for the reorganization. The Southern Railway Company was organ- 
ized under a plan for the reorganization of the Richmond and West Point Terminal Railway and Ware- 
house Company, a corporation organized and formerly existing under an act of Assembly of the State 
of Virginia dated March 8, 1880 (Acts of Assembly of Virginia, 1879-1880, chapter 238, p. 231), as amended 
by an act approved February 21, 1882 (Acts of Assembly of Virginia, 1881-1882, chapter 149, p. 151); 
an act approved March 2, 1882 (Acts of Assembly of Virginia, 1881-1882, chapter 192, p. 201); an act 
approved March 23, 1887 (Acts of Assembly of Virginia, 1887, chapter 3, p. 1), and the subsidiary hnes 
of said Richmond and West Point Terminal Railway and Warehouse Co., of which the principals were 
the Richmond and Danville Railroad Co., organized under an act of Assembly of Virginia, passed 
March 9, 1847 (Acts of Assembly of Virginia, 1846-1847, p. 108), as amended by various subsequent acts, 
and the East Tennessee, Virginia and Georgia Ry. Co., which was a corporation organized in January, 
1887, under the act of Tennessee passed March 12, 1877 (Acts of Tennessee, 1877, chapter 12, p. 17), by 
the purchase at foreclosure sale of the property formerly of the East Tennessee, Virginia and Georgia 
Ry. Co., which corporation was a company formed by consoHdation in 1871 of the East Tennessee and 
Georgia R. R. Co., originally known as the Hiwassee R. R. Co., and incorporated under an act of Ten- 
nessee in 1836 (Local Laws of Tennessee, 1835-1836, chapter 3, p. 23), and the East Tennessee and Vir- 
ginia R. R. Co., which was organized under an act of Tennessee passed January 27, 1848 (Acts of 
Tennessee, 1847-1848, chapter 120, p. 195). 

The necessity for the reorganization of the properties here mentioned arose by reason of their in- 
ability to meet all of their financial obhgations. 



82 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



COMPARATIVE GENERAL BALANCE SHEET 



Balance at 

Beginning of 

Year 1920 


Assets 


Balance at 

Close of Year 

1920 


Balance at 

Close of Year 

1921 


$415,538,952.87 


Investments: 


8422,972,675.65 

17,584,434.69 

9,822.50 

918,982.98 

35,329,105.90 
28,307,968.38 
4,936,368.04 
4,222,017.69 

94,007.00 

5,159,563.45 

418,680.17 


$ 422,139.757.54 


16,422,396.85 

2,072.50 

691,282.43 


Improvements on leased railway property 

Deposits in lieu of mortgaged property sold 

Miscellaneous physical property _ ... 


16,577,441.14 

6,800.00 

989,206.59 


33,987,505.90 
28,304,459.04 


Investments in affiliated companies: 
Stocks 

Bonds 


35,224,658.76 
26 307 912 28 


1,948,782.84 
2,813,956.73 

347,972.00 

6,359,963.45 

432,085.33 


Notes 

Advances 

Other investments: 

Stocks 

Bonds 

Notes 

Total investments 

Current Assets: 
Cash 


4,535,655.53 
3,873,143.96 

04,008.00 

2,659,563.45 

421,460.24 


$506,849,429.94 


$519,953,626.45 


$ 512,829,607.49 


$ 516,296.18 


S 7,969,141.67 

3,237,487.10 

1,432,810.19 

2,522,554.16 

1,250,792.01 

11,023,190.39 

17.635,896.18 

768,220.39 

887,995.36 


$ 8.097,605.58 


3,370,578.10 


Special deposits 


8,650,700.50 


2,077,770.05 
116,550.64 


Loans and bills receivable 

Traffic and car-service balances receivable 

Net balance receivable from agents and conductors 
Miscellaneous accounts receivable 

Material and supplies . 


867,662.92 

2,720,022.19 

312,615.45 


1,017,000.15 
6,338.41 


7,006,758.98 
13.473,154.76 


698,409.32 
262,791.05 


Interest and dividends receivable 

Other current assets 


1.277,280.99 
539,876.22 


$ 8,065,733.90 


$ 46.728,087.45 


$ 42,945,677.59 




Deferred Assets: 
Working fund advances 

Insurance and other funds 




$ 14,945.24 
1,283,487.00 


1 40,547.06 

1,252,975.32 

442,910.46 


S 48,836.78 
1,246,037.33 


39.679,013.26 


Other deferred assets 


86,383.33 




Total deferred assets 

Unadjusted Debits: 

Rents and insurance premiums paid in advance... 
Other unadjusted debits 




$ 40,977,445.50 


$ 1,736,432.84 


? 1,381.257.44 




$ 67,189.23 
52,617,147.98 


% 18.228.58 


$ 14,056,996.33 


3,329,108.22 








$ 14,056,996.33 


$ 52,684.337.21 


$ 3.347,336.80 








8569,949,605.67 


$621,102,483.95 


$560, 503,879.32 









SOUTHERN RAILWAY 



83 



COMPARATIVE GENERAL BALANCE SHEET 



Balance at 

Beginning of 

Year 1920 



S185,650,200.00 



185,650,200.00 



$ 82, 953. J 



1245,530,500.00 



1245,530,500.00 



$ 9,710,270.00 

38,885.47 

89,658.17 

562,147.94 

2,921,961.30 

8,417.50 

264,357.80 

56,502.00 

1,801,372.83 

182,331.08 

490,421.83 



$ 16,126,325.92 



$ 47, 920, 606. ( 



I 47, 920, 606. ( 



$ 659,240.18 

1,283,487.00 

869,852.40 

20,676,414.38 

123,686.92 

1,475,596.09 



$ 25,088,276.97 



$ 1,645,534.51 
1,500,504.28 



$ 3,146,038.79 
46,404,703.99 



$ 49,550,742.78 



$569,949,605.67 



Liabilities 



Stock: 

Capital stock — 
Book liability at clc 
Less holdings 



of year . 



.$185,670,200.00 
20,000.00 



Total stock. 



Governmental Grants: 
Grants in aid of construction. 



Long-Term Debt: 
Funded debt unmatured — 
Book liability at close of year 1920 $321 , 091 , 700. 00 

Less holdings 68,158,200.00 

Book liabihty atcloseof year 1921 329,024,500.00 
Less holdings 75,932,200.00 

Total long-term debt 



Current Liabilities: 

Loans and bills payable 

Traffic and car-service balances payable- 
Audited accounts and wages payable 

Miscellaneous accounts payable 

Interest matured unpaid 

Dividends matured unpaid 

Funded debt matured unpaid 

Unmatured dividends declared 

Unmatured interest accrued 

Unmatured rents accrued 

Other current liabilities 



Total current liabilities 



Deferred Liabilities: 
Other deferred liabilities. 



Total deferred liabilities 



Unadjusted Credits: 
Tax liability 

Insurance and casualty reserves 

Operating reserves 

Accrued depreciation — equipment 

Accrued depreciation — miscellaneous physical 
property 

U. S. Government and other unadjusted credits- 
Total unadjusted credits 



Corporate Surplus: 

Additions to property through income and surplus 
Appropriated surplus not specifically invested 



Total appropriated surplus . 
Profit and loss, credit balance. 



Total corporate surplus. 
Grand total 



Balance at 

Close of Year 

1920 



$185,650,200.00 



$185,650,200.00 



84,078.58 



$252,933,500.00 



$252,933,500.00 



7,880,270.00 

3,963,909.37 

21,126,810.15 

2,975.592.00 

2,898,169.30 

2,200.00 

161,727.80 

56,502.00 

1,930,730.60 

356,108.55 

1,854,530.99 



$ 675,180.43 

1,252,975.32 

2,762,394.84 

22,508,413.47 

' 139,899.47 
62,659,192.31 



$ 89,998,055.84 



$ 1,661,187.48 
14.340.81 



$ 1,675,528.29 
46,974,374.24 



$ 48,649,902.53 



1621,102,483.95 



Balance at 

Close of Year 

1921 



$ 185,650,200.00 



$ 185,650,200.00 



84,078.58 



$ 253,092,300.00 



$ 253,092,300.00 



5.954, 
2,023, 
14,592. 
2,399, 
2,925. 

32, 
56, 

1,824, 
320, 

1,089, 



270.00 
634.11 
011.25 
027.75 
320.70 
820.00 
589.80 
502.00 
735.32 
804.96 
735.58 



$ 43,206.550.76 


$ 31,219,451.47 


$ 580,196.24 


$ 203,985.84 


$ 580,196.24 


$ 203,985.84 



$ 1,251, 

1,246, 

1,304, 

24,674, 

131, 
4,429, 



395.94 
037.33 
255.11 
114.84 

268.41 
663.00 



$ 33.036,734.63 



$ 1,754 
21 



740.19 
593.18 



$ 1,776, 
55,440, 



333.37 
793.43 



$ 57,217,128.80 



$ 560,503,879.32 



84 



N. C. COKPOKATION COMMISSION 



0:2; 2 



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86 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



RAILWAY OPERATING REVENUES— ENTIRE LINE 



Class of Operating Revenues 



Freight 

Passenger 

Excess baggage 

Parlor and chair car 

Mail 

Express 

Other passenger-trai n 

Milk 

Switching 

Special service train 

Other freight-train 

Water transfers — Freight .-- 
Water transfefs — Passenger. 
Water transfers — Other 



Total Amount 

of Revenue for 

Year 1920 



Total rail-line transportation re- 
venue 



Dining and buffet 

Hotel and restaurant 

Station, train, and boat privileges 

Parcel room 

Storage— Freight 

torage— Baggage 

Demurrage 

Telegraph and telephone 

Power 

Rents of buildings and other 

property 

Miscellaneous 



Total incidental operating revenue 



Joint facility — Cr.. 
Joint facility — Dr. 



Total joint facihty operating 
revenue 



Total railway operating 



revenues. 



$100,338, 

37,122, 

242, 

12, 

5,365, 

3,228, 

594, 

239, 

992 

154 

283 



810.13 
638.46 
201.40 
444.67 
700.78 
681.23 
569.92 
,278.89 
,226.71 
,585.28 
,005.43 
t5.00 
5.24 
,968.76 



$148,580,111.90 



1,327,368.38 

12,152.24 

136,886.72 

33,200.30 

354,736.42 

11,951.46 

912,871.89 

630.03 

8,217.51 

93.036.44 
416,225.03 



$ 3,307,276.42 



$ 931,399.44 
1,377.83 



930.021.61 



$152,817,409.93 



Comparison 

With Total 

Revenue of 

Preceding Year 



$ 18,527,381.65 

282,833.35 

12,443.86 

4,763.17 

3.562,358.47 

190,706.12 

437,650.05 

11,790.77 

204,625.38 

16,023.53 

183,684.50 

*804.40 

4.54 

5,828.63 



$ 23,439,289.62 



127,440.22 

*2,330.89 

*41, 191.58 

5,318.90 

122,505.51 

3,282.50 

271,422.99 

*275.61 

721.91 

*113,966.67 
^598,665.95 



"225,738.67 



'185,158.44 
1,205.81 



^183,952.63 



$ 23,029,598.32 



Total Amount 

of Revenue for 

Year 1921 



85,185,081.64 

32,104,922.09 

241,247.09 

14,819.70 

3,373,069.76 

2,649,455.14 

433,947.73 

287,442.69 

848,174.26 

122,166.47 

284,966.16 

.12 

4.68 

2,944.57 



$125,548,242.10 



1,028,742.28 

8,667.29 

113,282.30 

30,202.50 

354,611.81 

11,711.14 

457,503.02 

422.12 

9,996.91 

101,809.62 
175,113.08 



$ 2,292,062.57 



875,199.79 
354.45 



874,845.34 



$128,715,150.01 



Comparison 

With Total 

Revenue of 

Preceding Year 



^15,153,731.49 

*5, 017. 716. 37 

*954.31 

2,375.03 

*1, 992, 631. 02 

*579,226.09 

*160,622.19 

48,163.80 

*144,052.45 

*32,418.81 

1,960.73 

5.12 

*.56 

*3,024.19 



$ *23,084,377.48 



*298,626.10 

*3,484.95 

*23,604.42 

*2,997.80 

*124.61 

♦240.32 

*455,368.87 

*207.91 

1,779.40 

8,773.18 
*241, 111.95 



^1,025,766.93 



$ *56, 199.65 

*1,023.38 



*55, 176.27 



$ *24, 165,320. 68 



*Denotes Decrease. 
fDenotes Debit. 



SOUTHERN- RAILWAY 



87 



RAILWAY OPERATING REVENUES— WITHIN THE STATE 



r 



Class of Operating Revenue 


Total 

Revenue for 

Year 1920 


Total 

Revenue for 

Year 1921 


Freight 


$ 21,768,453.63 

7,798,620.26 

48,303.60 

477.82 

1,116,633.08 

679,751.43 

111,515.27 

7,489.41 

95,721.53 

38,355.79 


$ 19,462,335.52 


Passenger . - . _ . 


6,768.042.20 




48,907.39 




651.77 


Mail - • 


693,412.30 


Express 


561,194.75 


Other passenger-train 

Milk 


80,981.99 
6,839.81 


Switching 


99,083.32 


Special service train 


34,122.32 


Other freight-train 


2.22 


Water transfers— Other 




100.00 








Total rail-line transportation revenue 


$ 31,665,321.82 


$ 27,755,673.59 


Dining and buffet 

Hotel and restaurant 


$ 272,231.64 


$ 231,652.00 
*2.80 


Station, train, and boat privileges 


36,964.29 
15,748.68 
72,179.17 
5,662.48 
177,155.66 
134.45 
18,073.82 
19,905.07 


33,463.82 


Parcel room 


14,666.00 


Storage — Freight 


89,322.51 


Storage — Baggage 


5,565.07 


Demurrage 


92,064.41 


Telegraph and telephone 

Rents of buildings and other property 

Miscellaneous 


85.95 
16,396.48 
14,502.90 






Total incidental operating revenue 


$ 618,055.26 


1 497,716.34 


Joint facility — Cr. 


$ 1,031.84 
397. 10 


$ 9,068.35 


Joint facility— Dr 


1,051.16 


Total joint facility operating revenue 


$ 634.74 


$ 10,119.51 


Total railway operating revenues 


$ 32,284,011.82 


$ 28 263 509.44 







•Denotes Debit. 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 
REVENUE FREIGHT CARRIED— ENTIRE LINE 



Commodity 


1920 


1921 


Carloads 


Tons 


Carloads 


Tons 


Pboducts of Agriculture: 
Wheat 


10,413 

7,701 

8,066 

1,940 

19,293 

18,978 

29,744 

22,707 

54,005 

23,583 

6,497 

21,658 

4,627 

8,379 

1,433 

6,319 


403,438 
233,028 
215,334 

45,670 
422,734 
405,693 
364,885 
239.269 
598,428 
478,834 

98,818 
297,626 

79,249 
105,618 

30,745 
101,669 


10,903 

6,511 

6,250 

1,528 

20,194 

16,118 

15,676 

21,879 

54,864 

23,602 

5,516 

20,124 

4,850 

6,003 

1,045 

5,291 


402 616 




191 754 


Oats 


145 191 


Other grain 


34 ''03 


Flour and meal 


358 709 


Other mill products 


283 083 


Hay, straw, and alfalfa 


188 119 


Tobacco 


220 150 


Cotton 


573 141 


Cotton seed and products, except oil 


455 238 




80 619 


Other fresh fruits . - - • 


250 736 


Potatoes - . - ------ - 


81 579 




75 831 




20.882 




83.683 






Total 


245,343 


4,121,038 


20,354 


3,445.534 






Products of Animals: 
Horses and mules 


4,575 

8,783 

719 

3,375 

2,306 

3,140 

1,164 

1,724 

479 

120 

2,815 

1,345 


49,096 

95,792 

6,871 

34,321 

31,096 

47,997 

11,669 

17,971 

5,140 

1,311 

62,535 

28,676 


2,184 

7,820 

816 

3,192 

2,425 

3,011 

1,467 

1,960 

464 

139 

3,246 

1,002 


23 542 


Cattle and calves 


83 884 


Sheep and goats 


7,350 


Hogs 


31,585 


Fresh meats 


32,359 


Other packing-house products 


42,507 


Poultry 


14,475 


Eggs 


19,962 




4,876 


Wool - 


1,217 




71.386 




19,318 






Total - 


30,545 


392,475 


27,726 


352,461 






Products of Mines: 


761 

288,691 

21,401 

7,624 

4,509 

231 

63,619 

1,795 

968 

3.769 

14,929 


35,672 

13,944,339 

795,134 

377,436 

180,805 

8,808 

2,692,976 

55,841 

31.054 

108,332 

557,968 


328 

191,548 

4,513 

825 

1,508 

41 

58,032 

305 

1,219 

3,350 

2,505 


14,885 


Bituminous coal 


9,485,932 


Coke 


150,939 


Iron ore 


36,170 


Other ores and concentrates 


59,646 


Base bullion and matte 


1,475 


Clay, gravel, sand, and stone 


2,665,625 


Crude petroleum 


8,713 


Asphaltum 


40,500 


Salt 


76,076 


Other products of mines - 


88,765 






Total -• 


408,297 


18,788,365 


264,174 


12.628.726 


Products of Forests: 

Logs, posts, poles, and cordwood 

Ties 

Pulp wood 


67,288 
11,765 
10,213 


1,543,879 
341,982 
231,711 


42,441 
11,140 
9,932 


1.019.744 
322.438 
240.310 



SOUTHERl^ EAILWAY 



89 



REVENUE FREIGHT CARRIED-ENTIRE LINE— Continued 



Commodity 


1920 


1921 


Carloads 


Tons 


Carloads 


Tons 


Products of Forests— Continued 

Lumber, timber, box shooks, staves, and 
headings - 


171,600 
10.899 


4,434,770 
215,775 


138,942 
6,023 


3,445,473 




108,633 






Total 


271,765 


6,768,117 


208,478 


5,136,597 






Manufactures and Miscellaneous: 

Refined petroleum and its products 


28,703 

3,151 

7,037 

158 

13,758 
3,300 

17,873 
2,494 
11,269 
13,885 
22,058 
9.460 
5,609 

8,861 

18,687 

6,794 

7,900 

1,848 

5,865 

54,899 

1,599 

11,070 

12,113 

3,882 

163,950 


744,416 
90.852 
155.383 
2.138 
538,199 
124,066 

530.877 
83,357 
200,404 
502,615 
753,427 
254,532 
101,972 

121,612 

129.766 

61,373 

65,524 

33,407 

80,108 

1,520,162 

35,211 

318,481 

125,652 

92,539 

3,398,814 


31,657 
3,721 
5,945 
46 
3,487 
2,320 

8,503 
773 

5,548 
14,243 
21,788 
7,902 
6,501 

4,526 
8,759 
4,342 
6.284 
901 
5,733 

35,249 

548 

6,579 

13,328 
2,145 

82,384 


827,426 
104,228 




119,832 




662 




141,758 




96,225 


Bar and sheet iron, structural iron, and iron 


218,307 




22,107 




96,374 




481,856 




679,318 




185,029 




112,568 


Agricultural implements and vehicles other 


66,360 




58,133 


Household goods and second-hand furniture. - 


37,149 
50,552 




15,057 


Ice 


82,241 




811,140 




11,571 




180,752 


Textiles 


131,244 


Canned goods (all canned food products) 

Other manufactures and miscellaneous 


46,468 
1,671,313 


Total 


436,223 


10,064,887 


283,212 


6 247 670 






Grand total, carload traffic 


1,392,173 


40,134,882 
2,793,499 


1,003,944 


27 810 988 


Merchandise— all L. C. L. freight 


2,310,308 










WL Grand total, carload and L. C. L. traffic 


1,392,173 


42,928,381 


1,003,944 


30,121,296 



—17 



90 



N. C. COEPOEATION COMMISSION 



RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES 



Name of Operating Expense Account 



I. Maintenance of Way and Structures 

Superintendence 

Headway maintenance — yard 

Roadway maintenance — other 

Tunnels and subways — other 

Bridges, trestles, and culverts — yard 

Bridges, trestles, and culverts— other 

Ties — yard 

Ties— other 

Rails— yard 

Rails — other 

Other track material — yard 

Other track material — other 

Ballast — yard 

Ballast — other 

Track laying and surfacing— yard 

Track laying and surfacing— other 

Right-of-way fences — yard 

Right-of-way fences— other 

Snow andsand fences and snowsheds— other 

Crossings and signs— yard. 

Crossings and signs — other 

Station and office buildings 

Roadway buildings 

Water stati ons 

Fuel stations 

Shops and enginehouses 

Wharves and docks 

Telegraph and telephone lines 

Signals and interlockers 

Power plant buildings 

Power line poles and fixtures 

Miscellaneous structures 

Paving 

Roadway machines 

Small tools and supplies 

Removing snow, ice, andsand 

Assessments for public improvements.. 

Injuries to persons 

Insurance 

Stationery and printing 

Other expenses . 



Total of accounts 

Maintaining joint tracks, yards, and other 
facilities — Dr. 

Maintaining joint tracks, yards, and Other 
facilities — Cr 

Equalization — way and structure 



Total maintenance of way and structures 

II. Maintenance of Equipment: 

Superintendence 

Sh op machi nery 



Entire Line 



1920 



1,512, 

120, 

2,766, 

12, 

57, 

1,639, 

10, 

4,898, 

25, 

316, 

200, 

538, 

14, 

512, 

539, 

4,890, 

1, 

76, 



146.79 
946.39 
700.00 
083.08 
528.00 
332.22 
799.80 
116.29 
019.55 
742.39 
139.30 
408.75 
755.00 
239.04 
129.00 
044.02 
019.22 
793.71 



35,053.50 
283,625.71 
912,551.57 
185,385.58 
337,280.39 
210,833.43 
335,290.31 

61,862.31 

122,234.92 

308,278.71 

1,160.20 



17,874.77 

1,176.93 

82,720.76 

161,602.77 

39,523.92 

*1, 139.77 

98,427.79 

83,111.20 

36,075.52 

4,350.12 



$21,449,223.19 

1,095,259.81 

303,585.08 



$22,240,897.92 



1921 



1,542 

189 

2,053 

7 

95 

1,263 

561 

3,923 

41 

575 

150 

403 

23 

498 

506 

4,075 

36 



,248.30 
,332.21 
,552.07 
,460.92 
,279.32 
,815 
,710.18 
,953.61 
,624.73 
,553.95 
,810.25 
,887.98 
,931.93 
,524.75 
,184 
,548.18 
953.86 
,221 



38,148.26 

300,306.43 

688,766.43 

144,501.13 

203,422.52 

131,206.03 

211,113.42 

66,531.43 

69,030.44 

250,569.09 

213.76 

757.41 



3,361. 
61,690.15 
143,134.26 
62,381.09 
112.23 
58,775.78 
132,761.13 
35,186.58 
3,595.67 



$18,556,158.12 
1,041,762.92 



*3]4,092.07 
3,658.49 



$19,287,487.46 



$ 687,861.63 
310,103.97 



$ 692,123.48 
178,636.18 



Within the State 



1920 



281,035.66 

24,009.78 

546,251.12 

566.53 

5,752.53 

163,310.10 

1,546.46 

727,999.50 

2,904.87 

36,551.12 

36,854.81 

99,155.22 

2,532.62 

87,999.10 

94,802.04 

860,152.63 

18.08 

1,332.50 



7,522.03 
60,840. 
170,361.54 
27,477.73 
47,433.45 
33,137.51 



23,479.14 
77,758.67 



15,865.95 

57.39 

16,976.69 

34,959.84 

7,308.31 

297.70 

20,746.54 

12,342.18 

7,127.03 

219.08 



$ 3,628,590.03 
150,131.57 
6,369.71 



$ 3,772,351. 



$ 139,427.83 
63,614.09 



1921 



285,903.25 

35,911.93 

430,629.99 

495.38 

19,915.37 

231,415.20 

121,404.78 

677,492.25 

2,705.59 

121,010.07 

23,045.69 

60,644.34 

4,766.62 

103,959.42 

110,522.11 

773,300.56 

17.75 

546.59 

2.65 

5,890.07 

81,201.11 

186,017.45 

27,073.75 

36,964.65 

17,389.49 

46,708.12 

*8.53 

12,846.89 

47,188.75 



15.20 

*4.10 

85.19 

16,425.26 

26,134.64 

22,346.85 



12,467.41 

24,272.76 

6,774.85 

173.70 



$ 3,573,653.05 
85,601.75 



11,361.90 
125,076.47 



$ 3,772,969.37 



$ 138,374.59 
35,661.20 



'Denotes credit 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY 
RAILWAY OPERATING EXPEHSES— Continued 



91 



Name of Operating Expense Account 



II. Maintenance of Equipment— Con<. 

Power plant machinery 

Steam locomotives — repairs 

Steam locomotives — depreciation 

Steam locomotives — retirements 

Freight-train cars — repairs ..- 

Frei ght- train cars — depreci ati on 

Freight-train cars— retirements... 

Passenger-train cars — repairs 

Passenger-train cars — depreciation 

Passenger-train cars — retirements 

Floating equipment — repairs 

Fl oati ng equip ment — depreci ati on 

Floating equipment — retirements 

Work equipment — repairs 

Work equipment — depreciation 

Work equipment — retirements 

Injuries to persons 

Insurance 

Stationery and printing 

Other expenses 



Total 

Maintaining joint equipment at terminals 
Dr 

Maintaining joint equipment at terminals 
Cr 



r 



Total maintenance of equipment . 

III. Traffic: 

Superintendence 

Outside agencies 

Advertising 

Traffic associations 

Industrial and immigration bureaus.. 

Insurance 

Stationery and printing ._ 

Other expenses 



Total. 



IV. Transportation— Rail Line: 

Superintendence --- 

Dispatching trains 

Stati on employees 

Weighing, inspection and demurrage bureaus 

[ Station supplies and expenses 

Yardmasters and yardclerks 

Yard conductors and brakemen 

Yard switch and signal tenders 

Yard enginemen 

Fuel for yard locomotives 

Water for yard locomotives 



Entire Line 



1920 



19,792.23 

028,501.60 

874,888.98 

25.86 

397,107.44 

507,677.66 

^210,129.16 

058,547.94 

141,337.96 

7,219.84 

7,781.43 

3,836.28 



273,617.96 

54,621.22 

9,371.42 

85,974.89 

118,196.31 
28,505.72 
16,713.48 



$30,421,554.66 

325,591.41 

80,117.84 



$30,667,028.23 



846,079.57 

753,363.36 

96,006.08 

69,052.12 

74,402.00 

4,821.00 

488,644.14 

279.51 



$ 2,332,647.78 



611,521.29 
213,485.82 
541,779.31 
236,978.62 
445,398.76 
379,096.17 
366,152.96 
103,013.58 
946,039.73 
266,456.09 
109,175.27 



1921 



20 

9,265 

789 

*11 

8,507 

1,545 

*115 

1,711 

142 

1 

22 

3 

1 

174 

54 

1 

49 

125 

30 

10 



,877.04 
,613.99 
,613.89 
,663.21 
,068.97 
,986.70 
,496.63 
,519.34 
,092.39 
.068.26 
,704.02 
,814.47 
,088.12 
,483.91 
,645.56 
,928.95 
,722.31 
,456.43 
,814.47 
,581.11 



$23,202,679.85 

201,439.51 

*8,019.76 



$23,396,099.60 



850,709.80 

1,014,582.31 

182,565.64 

58,990.39 

58,772.26 

708.24 

390,348.22 

180.65 



$ 2,556,857.51 



1,571, 

1,081, 

8,504, 

229, 

381, 

1,210, 

2,372, 

83, 

1,344. 

1,711, 

85, 



186.75 
680.37 
096.99 
813.85 
775.16 
596.93 
878.36 
723.11 
672.35 
778.38 
161.76 



Within the State 



1920 



4,133.17 

2,277,921.91 
179,614.01 



2,862,795.32 

350,241.55 

*49,239.16 

375,539.61 

26,089.98 

3,416.14 



74,637.39 
12,608.50 
1,828.84 
18,087.59 
22,861.47 
5,917.20 
3,826.87 



$ 6,373,322.31 
5,503.22 



$ 6,378,825.53 



177,692.70 

159,335.78 

19,941.80 

14,357.08 

16,402.66 

1,006.66 

101,978.22 

59.17 



,774.07 



315,010.17 

246,446.69 

2,480,409.25 

43,759.04 
103,911.45 
320,308. 
781,623.28 

11,909.58 
417,423.41 
445,387.94 

21,446.25 



1921 



3,898.00 

,717,315.83 

160,402.72 

*2,549.58 

,970,986.74 

365,032.25 

*22, 174.23 

308,980.83 

26,260.84 

193.78 



227.49 

44,159.59 

12,595.20 

446.04 

10,476.38 

24,207.59 

6,279.73 

2,179.73 



$ 4,802,956.72 
*7.71 



$ 4,802,949.01 



179,636.10 

214,060.91 

37,959.66 

12,495.59 

12,939.75 

99.44 

82,997.72 

34.97 



$ 540,224.14 



305,898.81 
224,740.71 
,113,157.45 

41,049.83 

94,041.55 
279,733.48 
598,739.09 

10,438.64 
309,371.65 
341,087.73 

16,614.37 



'Denotes credit. 



92 



N. C. COKPOBATION COMMISSION 
RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES— Conhnued 



Name of Operating Expense Account 


Entire Line 


Within the State 




1920 


1921 


1920 


1921 


Transportation— Rail IjIne— Continued 

Lubricants for yard locomotives 

Other supplies for yard locomotives 

Enginehouse expenses— yard 

Yard supplies and expenses 


$ 32,639.18 

49,268.33 

1,026,149.46 

67,445.97 

6,599,623.73 

4,989.60 

14,738,873.78 

728,531.51 

258,664.97 

285,538.62 

3,088,497.41 

8,007,060.33 

2,249,832.87 

81,944.41 

308,276.82 

26,948.47 

223,950.21 

50,636.98 

396,838.12 

59,337.66 

206,733.35 

355,146.69 

205,480.80 

296,483.29 

3,396,280.17 

25,267.04 

987,083.55 


$ 23,666.66 

34,646.60 

790,702.16 

52,325.13 

4,965,346.86 

4,545.01 

12,106,445.24 

630,809.62 

235,755.11 

211,270.46 

2,577,670.11 

5,973,070.56 

1,940,270.97 

73,917.36 

277,681.82 

24,929.44 

187,663.16 

46,108.82 

389,930.85 

72,593.85 

223,724.41 

186,475.13 

98,032.11 

179,320.93 

2,116,594.10 

14,346.42 

404,112.00 


$ 7,230.29 

10,116.86 

223,885.71 

12,456.51 

1,266,933.62 


$ 5,372.68 

7,807.63 

179.700.36 

10,753.91 

1,014 192 36 


Train motormen 






2,867,523.01 

116,703.36 

58,150.34 

54,580.00 

510,075.88 

1,517,714.28 

355,796.24 

22,800.81 

76,890.62 

2,161.83 

40,438.50 


2,425,559.34 


Water for train locomotives 


103 283 59 


Lubricants for train locomotives 


55 493 02 


Other supplies for train locomotives 

Enginehouse expenses — train 


43,922.79 
402 375 14 


Trainmen 


1 197 879 23 


Train supplies and expenses 

Signal and interlocker operation 


321,456.67 
21 945 22 


Crossing protection 


75 009 50 


Drawbridge operation 


1.24 


Telegraph and telephone operation 

Operating floating equipment 


33,146.45 




75,593.65 

5,088.65 

37,190.37 

62,083.71 

47,312.15 

31,230.53 

744,455.83 

5,618.59 

244,461.97 


78,4^1.76 


Other expenses _ _ . 


4,856.75 


Insurance - - _- 


37,648.85 




36,656.25 




20,987.75 


Damage to Uve stock on right of way 


8,229.95 
483,923.40 




4,507.58 




126,212.91 






Total 


$66,976,620.92 

4,008,846.02 

699,275.58 

251,565.85 

135,569.23 


$52,419,318.90 

3.341,109.68 

*443,522.27 

257,544.17 

130,577.36 


$13,584,129.05 

82,587.89 

*197,006.73 

40,297.26 

*23.53 


$11,034,227.64 


Operating joint yards and terminals— Dr. . 
Operating joint yards and terminals— Cr. . 
Operating joint tracks and facilities— Dr. . 
Operating joint tracks and f acihties— Cr. _ 


49,424.39 

*160,239.20 

44,469.44 

*146.34 


Total transportation— rail Hne 


$70,402,187.98 


$55,443,873.12 


$13,509,983.94 


$10,967,735.93 


VI. Miscellaneous Operations: 
Dining and buffet service 


$ 1,221,094.78 

8,117.67 

8,726.31 

247,543.39 


$ 936,489.11 

6,372.49 

16,198.78 

96,024.71 


$ 251,292.90 


$ 208,595.09 
























Total miscellaneous operations 


$ 1,485,482.15 


$ 1,055,085.09 


$ 251,292.90 


$ 208,595.09 


Vn. General: 
Salaries and expenses of general officers.,- 
Salaries andexpenses, clerks and attendants 
General office supplies and expenses 


$ 242,473.65 
2,669,470.42 
182,609.99 
563,137.60 
2,744.97 
52,225.69 
154,815.93 


$ 243,511.23 
2,660,257.79 
126,443.40 
598,998.17 
3,360.79 
45,547.11 
157,449.17 


$ 48,670.15 

527,623.98 

36,612.17 

112,822.17 

565.58 

10,486.75 

31,635.74 


1 49,017.21 

526,652.36 

24,947.18 

122,063.96 




1,492.37 




9,232.14 


Stationery and printing 


31,515.43 



♦Denotes credit. 



* 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY 
RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES— Conhnwed 



93 



Name of Operating Expense Account 


Entire Line 


Within the State 




1920 


1921 


1920 


1921 


VII. General— Conhnwed 
Valuation expenses 


$ 117,549.21 
48,789.90 


$ 121,684.59 
73,910.40 


$ 23,551.91 
10,010.64 


$ 24,260.04 


Other expenses 


16,684.33 






Total - - 


$ 4,033,817.36 


$ 4,031,162.65 


$ 801,979.09 


$ 805,865.02 








$ 70,622.25 
718.62 


$ 66,384.25 
*550.00 


$ 1,889.03 
*22.08 


$ 2,702.21 










Total general expenses 


f 4,103,720.99 


$ 4,096,996.90 


$ 803,846.04 


$ 808,567.23 


VIII. Transportation for Investment— 
Cr. 


4 4,183.60 


$ 7,392.72 


$ *31.87 


$ 724.77 


Grand total railway operating expenses 


$131,236,148.65 


$105,829,006.96 


$ 25,207,042.50 


$ 21,101,765.54 


Operating ratio (ratio of operating expenses 
to operating revenues), per cent 


85.88 


82.22 


73.08 


74.66 



"Denotes credit. 



EMPLOYEES AND THEIR COMPENSATION 





1920 


1921 


Average number employed 

Compensation 


47,952 
$79,315,784.92 


40,265 
$61,345,912.02 



94 



N. C. COKPORATION COMMISSION 






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05 UO 03 -H o <M ^ 
00 t^ t^ 02 03 CO 
05 t^ 0> -"*! ^ l>- 



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No. Leased 

and Held 

nder Equip. 

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SOUTHERN RAILWAY 
EQUIPMENT OWNED OR LEASED IN SERVICE OF COMPmY-Continued 



95 



I 





Company Service Equipment 


Class of Equipment 


Available for Service Close of Year 
1920 


Available for Service Close of Year 
1921 


Number 
Fully 
Owned 


No. Leased 

and Held 

under 

Equip. 

Trust 


Total 
Number 


Number 
Fully 
Owned 


No. Leased 

and Held 

under 

Equip. 

Trust 


Total 
Number 


Officers' and pay cars 

Ballast cars - 


15 

1 

32 

8 

180 

1,541 


4 


19 

1 

38 

199 
1,678 


15 

1 

32 

9 

181 

1,546 


4 


19 
1 


Derrick cars 


6 

3 

19 

137 


6 

18 
139 


38 




11 


Wrecking cars 


199 


Other company service cars 


1,685 


All classesof company 
service cars 


1,777 


169 


1,946 


1,784 


169 


1,953 


Floating Equipment: 
Steamboats and tugboats 
Barges, car floats, and 
canal boats 




2 

4 

1 


2 

17 
3 




2 

3 

1 


2 


13 

2 


14 


17 


Other floating equipment 


1 






Total floating equip- 
ment 


15 


7 


22 


14 


6 


20 






Equipment Owned or 
Leased, Not in Service 

OF Company: 
Locomotives 

Passenger-train cars 

Freight-train cars 

Company service cars 


44 

35 

9 

20 


4 

12 


48 

47 

9 

21 


41 

26 

9 

20 


3 

8 


44 

34 

9 


1 


1 


21 


Total cars 


108 


17 


125 


96 


12 


108 







96 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 
RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— ENTIRE LINE 




Item 


Amount 
1920 


Amount 
1921 




6,973.17 


6 971.08 






Train-miles: 


17,042,251 
310,561 


13 784 515 




203,463 






Freight— total - - . -. . . - 


17,352,812 

17,375,278 

511,251 

31,360 


13,987,978 




15,737,616 


Mixed 


549 860 


Special 


35 412 






Total transportation service 


35,270,701 


30 310 866 








1,063,705 


789,490 






Locomotive-miles: 
Freight — principal 


17,352,812" 
461,457 
532,608 


13,987,978 


Frei ght — helper 


273,059 


Freight — light 


332, 632 






Freight— total 


18,346,877 


14,593,669 








17,346,288 

99,627 

405,319 


15,708,893 




67,487 




379,710 








17,851,174 


16,156,090 






Mixed, train — principal 


511,251 
8,020 


549,860 


Mixed train — light 


9,648 






Mixed train — total 


519,271 


559,508 








31,629 


36,819 








31,629 


36,819 








1,229,814 


961,047 






Yard switching — freight 


7,945,245 
563,717 


5,588,609 


Yard switching — passenger 


512,006 






Yard switching — total 


8,508,962 


6,100,615 






Total transportation service 


46,487,727 


38,407,748 








1,063,705 


789,490 






Car-miles: 


388,411,395 
153,994,172 


300,148,345 


Freight train— empty - 


150,940,987 


Sum of loaded and empty 


542,405,567 
17,366,083 


451,089,332 


Freight train — caboose 


13,991,516 


Freight train — exclusive work equipment 


2,057,548 










559,771,650 


467,138,396 







SOUTHERN RAILWAY 
RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— ENTIRE L\NE— Continued 



97 



Item 


Amount 
1920 


Amount 
1921 


CAR-MihES— Continued 


44,737,399 

25,413,332 

4,033,306 

33,120,653 


39,385,702 


Passenger train— sleeping, parlor and observation.. 

Passenger train — dining 


23,823,588 
3,652,431 


Passenger train — other 


26,932,958 






Passenger train — total 


107,304,690 


93,794,679 






Mixed train — freight — loaded ----- .-. 


2,433,397 

721,401 

56,980 

1,036,107 

69,059 

133,798 


2,198,451 


Mixed train — freight — empty .. - - . 


976,038 


Mixed train — caboose - - 


72,828 


Mixed train — passenger 


1,061,570 


Mixed train — sleeping, parlor, and observation . 


443 


Mixed train — other passenger train 


48,295 






Mixed train — total . . - 


4,450,742 


4,357,625 








290,146 


338,960 




108 


Special train — caboose . 


26,356 

68,177 

35,835 

2,945 

7,639 


31,568 


Special train — passenger . . . . 


116,713 




16,834 


Special train — dining 


1,102 


Special train— other passenger train 


6,508 


Special train — total 


431,098 


511 793 






Total transportation service 


671,958,180 


565,802,493 






Work service . . . . 


1,922,763 


1,429 058 






Freight Service: 


42,928,381 
6,609,159 


30 121,296 


Tons— nonrevenue freight 


6,204,513 


Tons— total 


49,537,540 


36 325 809 








8,236,072,484 
1,125,526,116 


5,563 470 938 




1,075 637 762 








9,361,598,600 


6,639 108 700 






Passenger Service: 


21,914,632 
1,229,054,088 


16,220,874 




927,854,083 






Revenues and Expenses: 
Freight revenue 


$ 100,338,810.13 
37,122,638.46 
46,805,515.35 


$ 85 185 081 64 


Passenger revenue 


32 104 922 09 


Passenger service train revenue 


39 104 904 20 






Operating revenues 


$ 152,817,409.93 
131,236,148.65 


$ 128,715,150.01 
105 829 006 96 


Operating expenses 






Net operating revenues 


$ 21,581,261.28 


$ 22,886,143.05 



98 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION" 
RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— ENTIRE UNE— Continued 



Item 



Amount 
1920 



Amount 
1921 



Averages per Mile of Road: 

Freight-train miles 

Passenger-train miles 

Mixed-train miles 

Special-train miles 

Transportation service train-miles 

Work-train miles 

Locomotive-miles — transportation 

Freight service car-miles 

Passenger service car-miles 

Freight revenue 

Passenger service train revenue 

Operating revenues 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenues 

Ton- miles— revenue freight 

Ton- miles— all freight 

Passenger-miles— revenue 

Averages per Train-mile: 

Loaded freight car-miles — freight trains 

Loaded freight car-miles — mixed trains 

Empty freight car-miles — freight trains 

Empty freight car-miles — mixed trains 

Ton-miles — revenue freight 

Ton-miles — all freight . . 

Passenger train car- miles — passenger trains 

Passenger train car-miles — mixed trains 

Revenue passenger- miles 

Freight revenue 

Passenger service train revenue "_ . . . 

Operating revenues 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenues 

Averages per Locomotive-mile: 

Train-miles — freight trains 

Car-miles — freight trains 

Train-miles — passenger trains 

Car-miles — passenger trains 

Train-miles — mixed trains 

Car-miles — mixed trains 

Train-miles — special trains 

Car-miles — special trains 

Averages per Loaded Freight Car-mile: 

Ton-miles — revenue freight 

Ton-miles — all freight 

Freight revenue 

Averages per Car-mile — Passenger: 

Passenger-miles — revenue. . 

Passenger reven ue 

Miscellaneous Averages: 

Miles hauled — revenue freight 

Miles hauled — nonrevenue freight 



2,489 

2,492 

73 

4 

5,058 

153 

6,667 

80,781 

15,582 

14,389.27 

6,712.23 

21,915.06 

18,820.16 

3,094.90 

1,181,109 

1,342,517 

176,255 



22.38 

4.76 

8.87 

1.41 

461.04 

524.05 

6.18 

2.42 

68.71 

5.62 

2.62 

4.33 

3.72 



.95 
30.51 

.97 
6.01 



L57 



13.63 



21.07 

23.95 

256.72 



17.25 
520. 98 



191.86 
170.30 



% 



2,007 

2,258 

79 

5 

4,348 

113 

5,510 

67,530 

13,634 

12,219.78 

5,609.59 

18.464.16 

15,181.15 

3,283.01 

798,079 

952.379 

133,100 



21.46 

4.00 

10.79 

1.78 

386.49 

461.21 

5.96 

2.02 

58.43 

5.92 

2.46 

4.25 

3.49 

.76 



32.01 

.97 

5.81 

.98 

7.79 

.96 

13.90 



18.40 
21.96 
281.75 



14.44 
499.52 



184.70 
173.36 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY 
RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— ENTIRE UNE— Continued 



99 



Item 


Amount 
1920 


Amount 
1921 


Miscellaneous Averages— Continued 
Miles hauled — all freight 


188.98 

56.08 

$ 2.33735 

.01218 

1.69397 

.03020 

% 85.88 


182 77 




57.20 


Revenue per ton of freight 


$ 2.82807 
.01531 




1.97924 


Revenue per passenger-mile 

Operating ratio 


.03460 

% 82.22 



RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— WITHIN THE STATE 



Item 


Amount 
1920 


Amount 
1921 


Average mileage of road operated miles 


1,219.50 


1,219 50 


Train-miles: 
Freight— ordinary. ... ... 


3,394,436 
37,833 


2,830,365 




32.040 






Freight— total 


3,432,269 

3,056,291 

88,835 

7,337 


2 862 405 


Passenger 


2,811,458 


Mixed 


58,504 


Special .... 


8,692 






Total transportation service .............. . 


6,584,732 


5,741,059 






Work service ... . . . . 


224,437 


214,000 






Locomotive-miles: 
Freight— principaL .......... .... 


3,432,269 
193,181 
120,173 


2,862,405 


Freight— helper. ..... ... . ... 


153,556 


Freight— hght . . 


72,576 






Freight— total . 


3,745,623 


3,088,537 






Passenger— principal ..... 


3,056,291 
27,328 
48,262 


2,811,458 


Passenger— helper 


17,808 


Passenger— light 


47,423 






Passenger— total . . 


3,131,881 


2,876,689 






Mixed train— principal 


88,835 


58,504 


Mixed train— Hght... 


40 








Mixed train-total.. ... ... .... 


88,835 


58,544 






Special— principal . .... . .... 


7,341 


9,212 






Special— total 


7,341 


9 ''12 






Train switching 


133,948 


93 097 






Yard switching— freight 


1,942,122 
133,915 


1 448 596 


Yard switching— passenger... 


123,530 



100 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 
RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— WITHIN THE SI ^^E— Continued 



Item 


Amount 
1920 


Amount 
1921 


Locomotive-miles— Continued 


2,076,037 


1,572,126 






Total transportation service 


9,183,665 


7 698 205 






Work service 


224,437 


214,000 






Car-miles: 


92,310,505 
31,771,705 


74,968,458 




30,833,787 






Sum of loaded and empty . ... . 


124,082,210 
3,413,968 


105,802,245 


Freight train— caboose . 


2,847,313 


Freight train— exclusive work equipment 


418,784 








Freight train — total 


127,496,178 


109,068,342 






Passenger train — passenger 


8,147,494 

4,783,872 

584,405 

6,575,602 


7,381,716 


Passenger train — sleeping, parlor, and observation 


4,589,496 


Passenger train — dining 


617,102 


Passenger train — other. 


5,174,836 






Passenger train — total . .. 


20,091,373 


17,763,150 






Mixed train — freight — loaded . . . 


140,689 

33,129 

3,860 


144,923 


Mixed train — freight — empty 


46,952 


Mixed train— caboose .. .. . 


4,087 


Mixed train — exclusive work equipment ... 


638 


Mixed train— passenger... ...--... 


211,217 
64,164 
118,181 


116,086 


Mixed train— sleeping, parlor, and observation 

Mixed train — other passenger train. . . 


92 
27,331 






Mixed train— total 


571,240 


340,109 






Special train— freight— loaded 


74,114 

6,065 

17,154 

• 6.481 

408 

1,043 


93,298 


Special train— caboose... . . 


8,053 


Special train— passenger 


31,285 


Special train- sleeping, parlor, and observation. 


3,224 


Special train— dining ... . ... . .. 


293 


Special train— other passenger-train ... 


823 






Special train— total . .. 


105,265 


136,976 






Total transportation service 


148,264,056 


127,308,577 






Work service 


373,539 


329,447 






Freight Service: 
Tons— reveoue freight 


12,824,795 
2,357.109 


9,453,509 


Tons— nonrevenue freight . . . 


2,539,413 






Tons— total 


15,181,904 


11,992,922 






Ton-miles— revenue freight ... ... 


1,683,095,440 
298,022,000 


1,194,357,320 


Ton-miles— nonrevenue freight 


327,577,943 






Ton-miles— total . .. 


1,981,117,440 


1,521,935,263 







SOUTHERN RAILAVAY 
RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— WITHIN THE ST /KTE— Continued 



101 



Item 



Passenger Service: 

Passengers carried — revenue 

Passenger- miles — revenue 

Revenues and Expenses: 

Freight revenue 

Passenger revenue 

Passenger service train revenue 

Operating revenues 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenues 

Averages per Mile of Road: 

Freight-train miles 

Passenger-train miles 

Mixed-train miles 

Special-train miles 

Transportation service train-miles 

Work-train miles 

Locomotive-miles — transportation 

Freight service car-miles 

Passenger service car-miles 

Freight revenue 

Passenger service train revenue 

Operating revenues 

Operating expenses . 

Net operating revenues 

Ton- miles — revenue freight 

Ton-miles — all freight 

Passenger-miles — revenue 

Averages per Train-mile: 

Loaded freight car-miles — freight trains 

Loaded freight car-miles — mixed trains 

Empty freight car-miles — freight trains 

Empty freight car-miles — mixed trains 

Ton-miles — revenue freight 

Ton-miles— all freight 

Passenger train car-miles — passenger trains 

Passenger train car-miles — mixed trains 

Revenue passenger miles 

Freight revenue 

Passenger service train revenue 

Operating revenues 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenues 

Averages per Locomotive-mile: 

Train-miles — freight trains 

Car-miles — freight trains 

Train-miles — passenger trains 

Car-miles — passenger trains 

Train-miles — mixed trains 

Car-miles — mixed trains 

Train-miles — special trains 

Car-miles — special trains 



Amount 


Amount 


1920 


1921 


6,210,004 


4,764,528 


257,871,914 


194,506,767 


$ 21,768,453.63 


S 19,462,335.52 


7,798,620.26 


6,768,042.20 


9,762,790.87 


8,160,030.21 


1 32,284,011.82 


$ 28,263,509.44 


25,207,042.50 


21,101,765.54 


$ 7,076,969.32 


$ 7,161,743.90 


2,815 


2,347 


2,506 


2,305 


73 


480 


6 


7 


5,400 


4,708 


184 


175 


7,531 


6,313 


104,759 


89,681 


16,818 


14,713 


$ 17,850.31 


$ 15,959.27 


8,006.57 


6,691.29 


26.473.15 


23,176.31 


20,669.98 


17,303.62 


5,803.17 


5,872.69 


1,380,152 


979,383 


1,624,533 


1,247,999 


211,457 


1,594,971 


26.89 


26.19 


1.58 


2.48 


9.26 


10.77 


.35 


.8a 


478.00 


412.43 


562.64 


525.54 


6.57 


6.32: 


4.43 


2.45 


81.99 


68.57 


S 6.18 


$ 6.72. 


3.10 


2.88 


4.90 


4.92; 


3.83 


3.68 


1.07 


1.24 


.92 


.93 


34.04 


35.31 


.92 


.98 


6.42 


6.17 


1.00 


i.oa 


6.43 


5.81 


1.00 


.94 


14.34 


14.81 



102 



N. C. COKPOEATION COMMISSION 



RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS-WITHIN THE ST fiJE— Continued 



Item 



Amount 1920 



Amount 1921 



Averages per Loaded Freight Car-mile 

Ton-miles — revenue freight 

Ton-miles— all freight 

Freight revenue 

Averages per Car-mile — Passenger: 

Passenger-miles— revenue 

Passenger revenue 

Miscellaneous Averages: 

Miles hauled— revenue freight 

Miles hauled — nonrevenue freight 

Miles hauled— all freight 

Miles carried — revenue passengers 

Revenue per ton of freight 

Revenue per ton- mile of freight 

Revenue per passenger 

Revenue per passenger- mile 

Operating ratio 



% 



18.21 
21.43 
,23546 



19.53 
.59050 



131.24 
126.44 
130.49 
41.53 
1.69737 
.01293 
1.25582 
.03024 
78.08 



15.90 
20.26 
.25911 



16.09 
.55993 



126.84 
129.00 
126.90 
40.82 
2.05874 
.01629 
1.42051 
.03479 
74.66 



TAXES ON RAILWAY PROPERTY 





Paid in Year 1920 


Paid in Year 
1921 


Name of State 


Amount 
Assumed by 
Corporation 


Amount 
Assumed by 
U. S. R. A. 


Amount 

Charged to 

Railway Tax 

Accruals 


Amt. Charged 
to Railway 
Tax Accruals 


District of Columbia 

Virginia 


$ 8,632.66 
613,113.97 
790,767.90 
764,988.13 
402,009.65 
357,015.35 

35,773.19 
612,692.16 

28,962.31 
100,399.61 

95,303.27 


$ 1,673.74 

121,690.56 

211,187.44 

129,191.53 

75,036.62 

73,727.52 

8,842.87 

127,856.35 

*2,964.71 

34,551.62 

19,840.47 


$ 10,306.40 
733,804.53 
1,001,955.34 
894,179.66 
477,046.27 
430,742.87 

44,616.06 
741,548.51 

25,997.60 
134,951.23 
115,143.74 


$ 11,558.67 
724,959.88 


North Carolina 


867,846.51 




956,417.85 




502,231.74 


Alabama ..-..- 


455,887.40 




61,880.32 




507,695.62 




46,687.49 




234,149.83 




148,397.13 






Total 


$ 3,809,658.20 


$ 800,634.01 


$ 4,610,292.21 


$ 4,517,712.44 


U. S. Government Taxes. 
Federal Income Tax 


$ 85,000.00 
26,789.60 


$ *20,000.00 


$ 65,000.00 
26,789.60 




Capital Stock Tax 


$ 64,580.48 








Total 


$ 111,789.60 


S *20,000.00 


% 91,789.60 


$ 64,580.48 


Grand Total 


$ 3,921,447.80 


$ 780,634.01 


% 4,702,081.81 


$ 4,582,292.92 



*Denotes Credit. 



ASHEVILLE AND CKAGGY MOUNTAIN RAILWAY 



103 



ASHEVILLE AND CRAGGY MOUNTAIN 
RAILWAY COMPANY 

HISTORY 

Organized July 22, 1890, under laws of North Carolina, under act of General Assembly- 
ratified March 11, 1889. 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President - 


Fairfax Harrison 

C. E. A. McCarthy 


Washington, D. C. 


General Manager or Superintendent 


New York, N. Y. 


E. F. Parham . _.. 


Washington, D. C. 


Comptroller 


E. H. Kemper 


Washington, D. C. 







DIRECTORS 

Fairfax Harrison, Washington, D. C, H. W. Miller, Washington, D. C; F. S. Wynn, Washington, 
D. C; C. E. A. McCarthy, Washington, D. C. 

ROAD OPERATED 



From 


To 


Miles 




N. C. 


Total 


Craggy, N. C 

Connection with A. and C. M. Railway 
Co., N. C. 


End of hne, Burnsville Road 

Glenn's Creek, N. C, - 


2.26 
2.18 


2.26 
2.18 










4.44 









CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 





1920 


1921 


Capital stock 


$ 24,200.00 

10,708.00 

33,801.17 

14,956.27 

6,075.00 

2,688.06 

17,644.32 

19,807.53 

29,431.25 

*9,623.72 

4,461.16 

6,628.66 

19,802.53 

4,460.03 

5.00 

349.54 


$24,200.00 


Capital stock, per mile 


10 708.00 


Cost of road 


33 785.05 


Cost of road, per mile 


14 949 13 


Cost of equipment 


5 175 00 


Cost of equipment, per mile 


2 289 82 


Cost of road and equipment, per mile 


17 238 96 


Operating revenue 


21 359 29 


Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 


9 446 08 


Net operating revenue 


11 913 21 


Operating revenue, per mile 


4 810 65 




2 127 49 


Total freight revenue 


21 359 29 


Freight revenue, per mile 


4 810 65 


Revenue from other sources . ..... 




Taxes paid, N. C. 


580 51 







Employees, Number firemen, 1; conductors, 1; other trainmen, 1; section foremen, 1; other 
trackmen, 4; total, 5. 



•Deficit. 



104 



N. C. CORPOKATION COMMISSION 



ASHEVILI.E SOUTHERN RAILWAY COMPANY 



HISTORY 

Organized December 29, 1905, under laws of North Carolina. Line from connection with Asheville 
and Craggy Mountain Railway to Glen Rock (plant of National Casket Company), 2.13 miles was com- 
pleted July 20th, 1909. 

Operated by Asheville and Craggy Mountain Railway Company. 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




Fairfax Harrison 

E. F. Parham 

E. H. Kemper 


Washington, D. C. 


Secretary 


Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 







DIRECTORS 

Fairfax Harrison, Washington, D.C. ; H. W. Miller, Washington, D.C. ; F. S. Wynn, Washington, D.C 

ROAD OPERATED 



From 


To 


Miles 


N. C. 


Total 


Asheville, N C. 


Glenns Creek, N. C. 


2.18 


2.18 









CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



1920 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile . 



60,000.00 
27,522.93 
53,782.25 
24,670.76 
24,670.76 



60,000.00 
27,522.93 
53.782.25 
24,670.76 
24,670.76 



Note. — Operating revenue, expenses, etc. included in report of Asheville and Craggy Mountain 
Railway Company. 



ATLANTA AND CHAKLOTTE AIR LINE 



105 



ATLANTA AND CHARLOTTE AIR LINE COMPANY 

HISTORY 

Organized April 4, 1877 (a consolidation of three separate companies, formed March 19, 1877), under 
laws of North CaroUna, act of March 1, 1873; South Carohna, act of March 24, 1876, laws of 1876, p. 160;: 
Georgia, act of February 29, 1876. Consohdation authorized by laws under which the separate companies; 
were formed. 

OFFICERS 



Title - 


Name 


Official Address 


President 


Geo. F. Canfield ...-._ 


27 WilUam St., New York 


Secretary 


Harjan F. Stone 


27 WiUiam St., New York 


Treasurer 


John W. Flatten . . 


27 WiUiam St . , New York 









DIRECTORS 

Charles S. Fairchild, Cazenovia, N. Y.; Hiram W. Sibley, Rochester, N. Y.; Geo. F. Canfield, 
27 WiUiam Street, New York City; Robt. L. Harrison, 29 Wall Street, New York City; John A. Middle- 
ton, 143 Liberty Street, New York City; John W. Flatten, 55 Cedar Street, New York City; Herbert 
L. Griggs, 48 WaU Street, New York City; Harlan F. Stone, 27 Wilham Street, New York City; E. W. 
Lancaster, 160 Broadway, New York City; Henry Parish, Jr., 52 Wall Street, New York City; Morcan 
Delano, 59 WaU Street, New York City; Henry M. McAden, Charlotte, N. C. 

ROAD OPERATED 



From 


To 


Miles 


N.C. 


Total 


Charlotte, N.C 


Armour, Ga 


43.18 


263.08 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 




Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 
Revenue from other sources 



1,700,000.00 

6,461.92 

20,000,000.00 

76,022.50 

21,700,000.00 

82,484.42 

82,484.42 

1,128,000.00 



1921 



1,700,000.00 

6,461.92 

20,000,000.00 

76,022.50 

21,700,000.00 

82,484.42 

82,484.42 

1,128,000.00 



Employees: Number general officers, 5; total, 5. 

Note. — Road is operated by Southern Railway Company. 



k 



-18 



106 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



ATLANTIC AND DANVILLE RAILWAY COMPANY 

HISTORY 

The Atlantic and Danville Railway Company is a corporation of the State of Virginia, authorized 
by act of the General Assembly, approved April 2, 1882. 

The Company was sold under a deed of trust, securing a general mortgage and reorganized August 
2, 1894. 

The reorganization of the new company was authorized in the State of North Carolina by an act 
of the General Assembly, certified February 25, 1895. 

The road was leased to the Southern Railway by an agreement dated August 31, 1899, for a term to 
expire July 1, 1949. 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President 


B. Newgass 

C.O.Haines- . 


London, England 
622 Dickson Bldg., 
Norfolk, Virginia 







DIRECTORS 

B. Newgass, London, England; J. F. Rison, Danville, Virginia; C. L. Candler, Norfolk, Virginia, 
A. B. Carrington, Danville, Virginia; C. O. Haines, Norfolk, Virginia; W. H. M. Reed, Ports- 
mouth, Virginia; Edw. R. Baird, Jr., Norfolk, Virginia. 

ROAD OPERATED 



From 


To 


Miles 


N. C. 


Total 


Norfolk, Virginia 


Danville, Portsmouth, and Clare- 


22.15 


277.71 









CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



1920 



1921 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile. 



2,180,000.00 

7,850.00 

5,450,000.00 

19,624.82 
7,644,804.60 

21,528.01 



2,180,000.00 

7,850.00 

5,450,000.00 

19.624.82 

7,647,304.60 



Employees: Number general officers, 3. 

Note.— This road was leased to Southern Railway Company in August, 1899, and has been 
operated by them. 



ATLANTIC AND YADKIN RAILWAY 



107 



ATLANTIC AND YADKIN RAILWAY COMPANY 



OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President 


Fairfax Harrison. - -. 


Washington, D. C. 


Vi ce-Presi dent 


H. W. Miller 


Washington, D-. C. 


Vice-President 


L. Greene 


Washington, D. C. 


Vice-President 


F. S. Wynn . . 


Washington, D. C. 


Vice-President and General Counsel 


L. E. Jeffries 


Washington, D. C. 


Secretary 


G. E. Mauldin 


Washington, D. C. 


Treasurer 


E. F. Parham 

E. H. Kemper 


Washington, D. C. 


Comptroller 


Washington, D. C. 







DIRECTORS 

C. H. Ireland, Greensboro, N. C; A. E. Smith, Mount Airy, N. C; J. C. 
N. C; D. S. Abernethy, Washington, D. C; H. W. Miller, Washington, D. C; 
ton, D. C. 

ROAD OPERATED 



Watkins, Greensboro 
F. S. Wynn, Washing- 



From 


To 


Miles 




N. C. 


Total 


Mt. Airy, N. C. 


Sanford, N. C. 


130.95 
2.02 
18.74 
11.39 




Mt. Airy, N. C. 


Woodruff, N. C. 




Chmax, N. C. 


Ramseur, N. C. 




Stokesdale, N. C. 


Madison, N. C. 


163,10 









CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 





1920 


1921 


Capital Stock 


$ 1,000,000.00 

6,131.20 

1,500,000.00 

9,196.81 

2,729,353.66 

16,734.23 

860,250.68 

981,874.93 

*121,624.25 

5,274.38 

6,020.07 

544,449.13 

299,232.48 

3,338.13 

309,161 

$ 1,834.66 

16,569.07 

.02944 

39,836.48 


% 1,000,000.00 


Capital stock, per mile 


6,131.20 


Funded debt . 


1,500,000.00 


Funded debt, per mile 


9,196.81 


Cost of road and equipment 


2,740,864.50 


Cost of road and equipment, per mile 


16,804.80 


Operating revenue 


846,798.61 


Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 


816,485.61 


Net operating revenue 


30,313.00 


Operating revenue, per mile 


5,191.90 


Operating expenses, per mile 


5,006.04 


Total freight revenue 


545,719.67 


Total passenger train service revenue 


289 767.58 


Freight revenue, per mile 


3 345.92 


Total number passengers carried earning revenue 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 


252,932 
$ 1 776.63 


Revenue from other sources. .. __. .. . .. 


11,311.36 


Average receipts per passenger, per mile 


. 03403 


Taxes paid, N. C 


40,343.68 







Employees: 1920,267; 1921,271. Compensation: 1920, $378,125.55; 1921, $351,382.73. 



"Deficit. 



108 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



CAROLINA AND TENNESSEE SOUTHERN 
RAILWAY COMPANY 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 






Washington, D. C. 


Vice-President 

Vice-President 

Vice-President 


H. W. Miller... 

L. E. Jeffries 

L. Greene 

F. S Wynn 


Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C 


Vice-President 


Washington, D C 


Secretary 


G. E Mauldin 


Washington, D. C 


Treasurer 


E. F. Parham 


Washington, D. C. 


Comptroller 


E. H. Kemper 


Washington, D. C. 









DIRECTORS 

J. G. Brown, Raleigh, N. C.; Fairfax Harrison, Washington, D. C; L. A. Mahler, Raleigh, N. C. 
H. W. Miller, Washington, D. C.; R. B. Pegram, Atlanta, Ga.; F. S. Wynn, Washington, D. C. 

ROAD OPERATED 





From 


To 


Miles 




N.C. 


Total 


Bushnell, N. C 


Fontana, N.C...., 


1 

13.90 











CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



1920 



1921 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included). 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, N. C 



60,000.00 


$ 60,000.00 


4,316.54 


4,316.54 


729,840.37 


683,000.00 


52,506.50 


4,913.68 


637,240.67 


574,665.62 


45,844.60 


41,342.85^ 


38,772.59 


31,044.51 


42,474.09 


28,676.28; 


*3,701.50 


2,368.23 


2,789.39 


2,233.42 


3,055.68 


2,063.04 


31,688.00 


25,489.21 


5,935.64 


5,410.76. 


2,279.71 


1.833.75 


17,109 


12,653 


427.09 


$ 317.31 


1,148.95 


144.54 


.02392 


.0344a 


831.10 


1,076.25 



Employees: 1920, 15; 1921, 11. Compensation: 1920, t$13,323.97; 1921, t$12,975.00. 

* Deficit. 

t Does not include compensation to enginemen and trainmen. 



DANVILLE AND WESTEKN RAILWAY 



109 



DANVILLE AND WESTERN RAILWAY COMPANY 



HISTORY 



Organized January 14, 1891, under laws of Virginia. Charter, March 29, 1873. 
1876-7, p. 163, 1881-2, pp. 256-259, 1885-86, pp. 317-362. 



Amended acts, 



OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


> 
President 


Fairfax Harrison 


Washington, D. C 


Vice-President 


F. S. Wynn 

D. S. Abernethy 

L. E. Jeffries 

G. E. Mauldin 

E. F. Parham 

E. H. Kemper 


Washington, D. C 


Vice-Presi dent 


Washington, D C. 


Vice-President and General Counsel 

Secret arv 


Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D C. 


Treasurer 


Washington, D C 


Comptroller 


Washington, D C 







DIRECTORS 

Fairfax Harrison, Washington, D. C; Samuel Harrison, Wenonda, Virginia; J. E. Latham, Greens- 
boro, N. C; F. S. Wynn, Washington, D. C; B. Frank Mebane, Spray, N. C; James G. Pritchett, 
Danville, Virginia; Pannill Rucker, Martinsville, Virginia; R. A. Schoolfield, Danville, Virginia; 
J. B. Sparrow, Martinsville, Virginia; John P. Swanson, Danville, Virginia. 

ROAD OPERATED 



From 


To 


Miles 


N. C. 


Total 


Danville, Virginia. . 


Stuart, Virginia, and branches... 


7.65 


77.88 







I 



110 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



CAPITAL STOCK. ETC. 



1920 



1921 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue. -. 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, N. C 



368,600.00 

4,563.01 

2,297,773.75 

28,444.83 

1,897,708.05 

24,976.31 

296,756.27 

3,905.45 

28,882.13 

637,929.91 

587,048.78 

50,881.13 

8,396.68 

7,739.59 

471,190.73 

156,104.02 

5,833.01 

281,673 

1,932.45 

10,635.16 

.03159 

1,804.20 



368,600.00 

4,732.87 

2,297,773.75 

29,504.03 

1,901,554.11 

24,416.46 

291,932.22 

3,748.23 

28,164.95 

644,421.27 

497,565.32 

146,855.95 

7,750.11 

5,983.95 

488,225.38 

139,238.74 

5,871.62 

164,318 

1,674.79 

16,957.15 

.03607 

2,063.66 



Employees: Number general officers, 5; office clerks, 59; station agents, 19; other station men, 15; 
enginemen, 5; firemen, 5; conductors, 5; other trainmen, 16; machinists, 3; carpenters, 10, other shop- 
men, 18; telegraph operators, 5; section foremen, 7; other trackmen, 41; other employees, 25; total, 237. 



HIGH POIIS^T, BANDLEMAN, ASHEBORO AND SOUTHERN RAILROAD 111 

HIGH POINT, RANDLEMAN, ASHEBORO AND SOUTHERN 
RAILROAD COMPANY 



OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President 


Fairfax Harrison 


Washington, D. C. 


Vice-President 


F. S. Wynn . 


Washington, D. C. . 


Vice-President 


D. S. Abernethy . . . 


Washington, D. C. 




L. E. Jeffries . . . _ 


Washington, D. C. 


Secretary 

Treasurer 

Comptroller 


G. E. Mauldin . . . 




E. F. Parham 

E. H. Kemper 


Washington, D. C 
Washington, D. C. 



DIRECTORS 

A. M. Bulla, Randleman, N. C; F. S. Wynn, Washington, D. C; J. Elwood Cox, High Point, 
N. C; R.F. Dalton, Greensboro, N. C; T. J. Finch, Thomasville, N. C; Fairfax Harrison, Washing- 
ton, D. C; F. N. Tate, High Point, N. C; P. H. Morris, Asheboro, N. C; J. S. McAllister, 
Greensboro, N. C; F. M. Pickett, High Point, N. C; W. H. Ragan, High Point, N. C; J. E. Walker, 
Asheboro, N. C; W. P. Wood, Raleigh, N. C. 

ROAD OPERATED 



From 


To 


Miles 


N.C. 


Total 


High Point, N. C 


Asheboro, N.C- .. 




27.84 







CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



1920 



1921 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile . 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue. __ 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, N. C .. 



248,400.00 


$ 248,400.00 


8,822.41 


8,822.41 


402,000.00 


402,000.00 


14,439.62 


14,439.62 


677,470.95 


678,467.49 


24,334.44 


24,370.24 


160,733.80 


156,047.14 


161,991.23 


105,113.19 


*1,257.43 


50,933.95 


5,773.52 


5,605.14 


5,818.65 


3,775.62 


104,423.77 


107,555.96 


49,624.48 


22,205.66 


3,750.85 


3,864.03 


83,023 


47,902 


1,782.49 


$ 797.58 


6,684.55 


26,285.52 


.02956 


.03529 


7,417.00 


5,461.18 



Employees: 1920,38; 1921,49. Compensation: 1920,166,074.22; 1921, $62,580.58. 



^Denotes deficit. 



112 



N. C. COKPOKATION COMMISSION 



NORTH AND SOUTH CAROLINA RAILROAD COMPANY 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President 


Fairfax Harrison 


Washington, D. C. 


Vi ce-Presi dent 


L. E. Jeffries 


Washington, D. C. 


Vice-President 


F. S. Wynn 


Washington, D. C. 




C. E. A. McCarthy 

E. F. Parham 


New York, N. Y. 




Washington, D. C. 




E. H. Kemper . _ .. . 


Washington, D. C. 









DIRECTORS 

W. S. Camp, Washington, D. C; Fairfax Harrison, Washington, D. C; C. E. A. McCarthy, New 
York, N. Y.; C. D. Mackay, Washington, D. C; J. W. Martin, Washington, D. C; Guy E. Mauldin, 
Washington, D. C; E. A. Merrill, New York, N. Y.; F. S. Wynn, Washington, D. C. 

ROAD OPERATED 



From 


To 


Miles 


N. C. 


Total 


State Line 


Mines, N. C 




3.73 









CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



1920 



1921 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 



50,000.00 


$ 50,000.00 


13,405.00 


13,405.00 


62,211.08 


62,211.08 


16,678.00 


16,678.00 


112,211.08 


112,211.08 


30,083.40 


30,083.40 



Note.— This railroad is operated by the Southern Railway Company, and revenue, operating 
expenses, and other information are included in their report. 



NOETH CAROLINA RAILROAD 



113 



NORTH CAROLINA RAILROAD COMPANY 



HISTORY 



Organized January 1, 1850, under laws of North Carolina. January 27, 
February 10, 1874. 



February 14, 1855 ■, 



OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


Presi dent 


WadeH. Harris 

Archibald Johnson 


Charlotte, N. C. 
Burlington, N. C. 







DIRECTORS 

Wade H. Harris, Charlotte, N. C. ; R. W. H. Stone, Greensboro, N. C. ; Will Weill, Charlotte, N. C. ; 
Gilbert White, Durham, N. C; Benehan Cameron, Stagville, N. C; W. E. Holt, Lexington, N. C; 
W. F. Brown, Winston-Salem, N. C; Robert Lassiter, Charlotte, N. C; John F. Bowles, Statesville, 
N. C; C. W. Johnston, Charlotte, N.C.; Alexander Webb, Raleigh, N.C.; Hugh MacRae, Wilmington, 
N. C. 

ROAD OPERATED 



From 


To 


Miles 


N.C. 


Total 


Goldsboro, N. C. 


Charlotte, N. C. 


223 


55 









CAPITAL STOCK. ETC. 





1921 


Capital stock 


$ 4,000,000.00 


Cost of road 


4,975,627.53 


Operating revenue 


4,600.08 


Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 


2,416.98 


Net operating revenue 


7,017.06 


Taxes paid, N. C. . 


770.64 







Employees: Number general officers, 4; office clerks , 1. 
Note.— Leased to Southern Railway Company, August 
1896. Revenue, expense, etc., covered in its report. 



1895, said lease beginning January 1, 



114 



N. C. COKPORATION COMMISSION 



NORTH CAROLINA MIDLAND RAILROAD COMPANY 



OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President 

Vice-President 

Vice-President 

Vice-President and General Counsel 

Secretary 


Fairfax Harrison 

H. W. Miller 

F. S. Wynn 

L.E. Jeffries 

G. E. Mauldin 

E. F. Parham 

E. H. Kemper 


Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D C 


Treasurer 


Washington, D. C. 


Comptroller 


Washington, D. C. 



DIRECTORS 

J. A. Gary, Winston-Salem, N. C; G. W. Mountcastle, Lexington, N. C; J. F. Brawley, Moores- 
ville, N. C; C. P. McNeely, Mooresville, N. C; Fairfax Harrison, Washington, D. C; H. W. Miller, 
Washington, D. C; H. E. Fries, Winston-Salem, N. C; J. W. Fries, Winston-Salem, N. C; P. H. 
Haynes, Winston-Salem, N. C; W. N. Reynolds, Winston-Salem, N. C; R. T. Chatham, Winston- 
Salem, N. C, Mayor of Winston; J. G. Hanes, Winston-Salem, N. C; J. F. Hanes, Winston-Salem, N. C. 

ROAD OPERATED 



From 


To 


Miles 


N. C. 


Total 


Mooresville, N. C. 


Winston-Salem, N. C 




53.52 









CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 





1920 


1921 


Capitalstock 


$ 924,000.00 

17,264.00 

801,000.00 

14,996.00 

1,725,000.00 

32,230.94 


$ 924,000.00 


Capital stock, per mile .. . . 


17,264.00 


Funded debt 


801,000.00 


Funded debt, per mile 


14,996.00 


Cost of road 


1,722,000.00 


Cost of road, per mile 


32,174.88 







Note.— This railroad is operated by the Southern Railway Company, and revenues, operating 
expenses, and other information are included in their report. 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY CAROLINA DIVISION 



115 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY— CAROLINA DIVISION 



OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




Fairfax Harrison 

H.W.Miller 


Washington, D. C. 




Washington, D. C. 




F. S.Wynn 

L.E.Jeffries . ._ 


Washington, D. C. 




Washington, D. C. 




G. E. Mauldin_ .. 


Washington, D. C. 




E. F. Parham 








Washington, D. C. 









DIRECTORS 



L. Greene, Washington, D. C.; Fairfax Harrison, Washington, D. C.; 
D.C.; C.D.Mackay, Washington, D.C.; J. P. Matthews, Columbia, S. C. 
F. S. Wynn, Washington, D. C. 

ROAD OPERATED 



H. W. Miller, Washington, 
J. H.Pou, Raleigh, N. C. 



1920 



1921 



Cayce, S. C., to Hardieville, S. C 

Spartanburg, S. C., to Alston, S. C 

Biltmore, N. C., to Hayne, S. C 

Charleston, S. C, to Augusta, Ga 

Branchville, S. C, to Columbia, S. C 

Kingsville, S. C, to Marion, N. C 

Perry, S. C, to Sievern, S. C 

Blacksburg, S. C, to Gaffney, S. C 

Burton, S. C. branch 

Sumter Junction, S. C, to Sumter, S. C 

Total miles 

Leased: 
Transylvania Railroad Co. — 

Hendersonville, N. C, to Lake Toxaway, N. C 

Trackage Rights: 
Atlantic Coast Line — 

Hardieville, S. C, to Central Junction, Ga 

Grand total miles 

In North CaroHna— 103.74 miles. 



128.63 


128.63 


67.93 


67.93 


66.01 


66.01 


136.50 


136.50 


66.30 


66.30 


208.50 


208.50 


7.64 


7.64 


10.50 


10.50 


5.20 


5.20 


15.81 


15.81 



713.02 



42.10 



16.70 



771.82 



713.02 



42.10 



16.70 



771.82 



116 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



CAPITAL STOCK. ETC. 



1920 



1921 



Capital stock « 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included). 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue '. 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 



4,176,200.00 

5,835.77 

11,259,500.00 

15,733.90 

15,532,357.00 

21,704.75 



4,176,200.00 

5,835.77 

11,259,500.00 

15,733.90 

15,524,556.08 

20,048.00 

1,511,073.45 

1,407,322.33 

103,751.12 

10,179.69 

9,480.75 

980,805.57 

485,360.85 

6,607.42 

578,836 

3,269.74 

44,907.03 

.03424 



STATE UNIVEKSITY EAILEOAD 



117 



STATE UNIVERSITY RAILROAD COMPANY 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 






Washington, D. C. 


Vice-President 


H. W. Miller . 


Washington, D. C. 


Vice-President 


L.E.Jeffries .. - - . 


Washington, D. C. 


Vice-President 


F. S. Wynn 


Washington, D. C. 




G. E. Mauldin . . .__._.. 


Washington, D. C. 




E. F. Parham. . _ . .. 


Washington, D. C. 




E. H. Kemper 


Washington, D. C. 









DIRECTORS 

Fairfax Harrison, Washington, D. C; H. W. Miller, Washington, D. C; D. S. Abernethy, Wash- 
ington, D. C; F. S. Wynn, Washington, D. C; R. B. Pegram, Atlanta, Ga.; W. P. Few, Durham, 
N. C; W. A. Erwin, W. Durham, N. C. 

ROAD OPERATED 



From 


To 


Miles 


N. C. 


Total 




Chapel Hill, N. C ..- 




10.20 









CAPITAL STOCK ETC. 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 
Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile. 



1920 



1921 



31,300.00 


$ 31,300.00- 


3,068.63 


3,068.63 


31,300.00 


31,300.00' 


3,068.63 


3,068.65 



Note.— This railroad is operated by the Southern Railway Company, and revenue, operating 
expenses, and other information are included in their report. 



ii; 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

TALLULAH FALLS RAILROAD COMPANY 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President 


Fairfax Harrison 


Washington, D C 


Vice-President 


L. E. Jeffries 


Washington, D C 


Vice-President 


F. S. Wynn 


Washington, D C 


Vice-President 


D. S. Abernethy 


Washington, D C 


Secretary 


G. E. Mauldin 


Washington, D. C. 


Treasurer 


E. F. Parham 


Washington, D. C. 






Washington, D. C. 









DIRECTORS 

Preston S. Arkwright, Atlanta, Ga.; Fairfax Harrison, Washington, D. C; Frank Hawkins, 
Atlanta, Ga.; H. W. Miller, Washington, D. C; J. T. Peyton, Mount Airy, Ga.; Billups Phinizy, 
Athens, Ga.; F. S. Wynn, Washington, D. C.; R. B. Pegram, Atlanta, Ga.; Lindsay Hopkins, 
Atlanta, Ga. 

ROAD OPERATED 



From 


To 


Miles 


N. C. 


Total 


Cornelia, Ga. 


FrankUn, N. C 


14.50 


58.00 









CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses , per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue. -. 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, N. C 



1920 



1921 



$ 323,400.00 


$ 323,400.00 


5,575.86 


5,575.86 


1,519,000.00 


1,519,000.00 


26,189.66 


26,189.66 


1,688,326.89 


1,684,591.80 


29,109.08 


29,044.69 


196,479.63 


172,544.48 


306,117.28 


230,411.99 


♦109,637.65 


♦57,867.51 


3,434.95 


3,016.51 


5,351.70 


4,028.18 


108,062.64 


97,540.09 


79,184.20 


68,470.27 


1,889.20 


1,705.25 


148,064 


101,020 


$ 1,384.33 


$ 1,197.03 


9,232.79 


6,534.12 


.03013 


.03571 


3,119.18 


1,044.85 



Employees: 1920,86; 1921,86. Compensation: 1920, $122,604.50; 1921, $107,465.21. 



'Deficit. 



YADKIN RAILROAD 



119 



YADKIN RAILROAD COMPANY 



OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 






Washington, D. C. 


Vice-President 


F. S. Wynn 


Washington, D C. 




D. S. Abernethy . . . . 


Washington, D. C. 




L. E. Jeffries - . _ . 


Washington, D. C. 


Secretary 


G. E. Mauldin - - 


Washington, D. C. 


Treasurer 


E. F. Parham 


Washington, D. C. 


Comptroller 


E. H. Kemper 


Washington, D. C. 









DIRECTORS 

D. S. Abernethy, Washington, D. C; A. H. Boyden, Salisbury, N. C; Fairfax Harrison, Washing- 
ton, D. C; S. H. Hearne, Albemarle, N. C; D. W. JuHan, Salisbury, N. C; H. W. Miller, Washington, 
D. C; J. M. Morron, Albemarle, N. C; Walter Murphy, Salisbury, N. C; F. S. Wynn, Washington, D.C. 

ROAD OPERATED 



From 


To 


Miles 


N. C. 


Total 


Salisbury, N. C 


Norwood, N. C 

Badin, N. C 


41.00 
11.23 




Leased:— Tallahassee Power Co. 
Hall's Ferry Junction, N. C. 


52.23 







CAPITAL STOCK. ETC. 





1920 


1921 


Capital stock 


$ 625,000.00 

15,244.00 

615,000.00 

15,000.00 

1,350,957.19 

32,950.00 

346,341.83 

385,038.72 

♦38,696,89 

6,631.09 

7,371.99 

263,647.57 

78,928.86 

5,047.82 

120,697 

S 1,319.72 

3,765.40 

.03098 

4,957.28 


$ 625,000.00 


Capital stock, per mile 


15,244.00 


Funded debt 


615 000.00 


Funded debt, per mile 


15,000.00 


Cost of road and equipment 


1 350 444.21 


Cost of road and equipment, per mile 


32 950.20 


Operating revenue 


303 044.07 


Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 


248 814.70 


Net operating revenue 


54,229.37 


Operating revenue, per mile 


5 802.10 


Operating expenses, per mile 


4 763.81 


Total freight revenue . 


240 405.53 


Total passenger train service revenue 


59 197.38 


Freight revenue, per mile 


4 602.82 


Total number passengers carried earning revenue 


77,119 


Passenger service train revenue, per mile 


$ 1,133.39 


Revenue from other sources 


3,441.16 


Average receipts per passenger, per mile 


. 03490 


Taxes paid, N C. 


3 203 98 







Employees: 1920, 81; 1921, 92. Compensation: 1920, $132, 154.61; 1921, $127,608.32. 



"Deficit. 



120 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

MISCELLANEOUS RAILROADS 



Aberdeen and Rockfish Railroad Company 

HISTORY 

Organized June 22, 1892, under laws of North Carolina Secretary of State, also Chapter 22 of 
1893, Chapter 45 of 1901, Chapter 401 of 1907, Chapter 200 of 1911, Chapter 289 of March, 1913. 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 








General Manager or Superintendent 


W. A. Blue 

W. A. Blue 

A. L. Thompson 


Aberdeen, N. C. 
Aberdeen, N C 


Traffic Manager __ 


Fayetteville, N. C. 





DIRECTORS 

John Blue, W. A. Blue, J. W. Graham, J. McN. Johnson, and J. A. Bryant, all of Aberdeen, N. C. 
and H. W. Jackson, of Richmond, Va. 

ROAD OPERATED 



From 


To 


Miles 


N.C. 


Total 


Aberdeen, N.C 


Fayetteville, N. C, and branch 


59.54 


59.54 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



1920 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost> of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue. -. 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, N. C 



208,800.00 


$ 208,800.00 


3,506.88 


3,506.88 


177,000.00 


177,000.00 


2,972.79 


2,972.79 


462,161.28 


407,259.50 


7,762.20 


6,840.09 


187,143.75 


160,793.17 


144,935.09 


127,213.69 


42,208.66 


33,579.48 


3,143.17 


2,700.59 


2,434.25 


2,138.29 


165,771.46 


138,564.62 


11,145.55 


11,880.86 


2,784.37 


2,293.67 


15,342 


18,260 


187.19 


S 199.54 


10,226.74 


10,347.69 


.0294 


.0294 


4,155.21 


7,447.46 



Employees: Number general officers, 5; office clerks, 1; station agents, 7; other station men, 6; 
enginemen, 2; firemen, 2; conductors, 2; other trainmen, 3; machinists, 2; carpenters, 1; other shop- 
men, 3; telegraph operators, 0; section foremen, 5; other trackmen, 15; other employees, 15. Total, 67. 



APPALACHIAN RAILWAY 



121 



Appalachian Railway Company 



HISTORY 

Organized July 30, 1908, under laws of North Carolina, 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President 


A. J. Stephens 

J. A. Sisk 

David G. Wilson 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


General Manager or Superintendent 

Secretary and Treasurer 


Ela, N. C. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



DIRECTORS 

A. J. Stephens, Philadelphia, Pa.; Fred H. Ely, Philadelphia, Pa.; E. M. Bechtel, Philadelphi 
Pa.; David G. Wilson, Philadelphia, Pa. ; E. A. Gaskill, Ravensford, N. C. 

ROAD OPERATED 



From 


To 


Miles 


N. C. 


Total 


Ela, N C. 


Ravensford, N. C. 


10 


10 









r 



CAPITAL STOCK. ETC. 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger-train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue. ,. 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, N. C 



1920 



1921 



1 100,000.00 


$ 100,000.00 


10,000.00 


10,000.00 


200,000.00 


191,000.00 


20,000.00 


19,100.00 


315,452.16 


323,991.66 


31,545.21 


32,399.16 


11,827.47 


13,506.80 


1,182.74 


1,350.68 


42,727.96 


33,749.85 


79,517.05 


72,752.63 


61,831.09 


56,553.15 


17,685.96 


16,199.48 


7,951.79 


7,275.26 


6,183.10 


5,655.32 


68,896.68 


67,185.02 


9,519.61 


4,301.93 


6,889.66 


6,718.50 


34,338 


13,249 


$ 951.96 


$ 430.19 


1,100.76 


1,265.68 


.0277 


3.24 


797.75 


1,235.59 



Employees: Number general officers, 6; station agents, 2; other station men, 1; enginemen, 1; 
firemen,!; conductors,!; other trainmen, 2; other trackmen, 10; total, 26. 



— 19 



122 



N. C. CORPOKATION COMMISSION 



Asheville and East Tennessee Railroad Company 

HISTORY 

Organized March 19, 1909, under the laws of North Carohna, special act March 8, 1909, amended 
March 5, 1913, Chapter 297, proceedings of the General Assembly. 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President 

General Manager and Vice-President 


J. S. Coleman 

Stanley Rowland 


Asheville, N. C. 
Asheville N C 


Secretary and Treasurer 


G. W. Epps 


Asheville N C 


Traffic Manager 


Reginald Rowland 


Asheville N C 









DIRECTORS 

J. S. Coleman, Asheville, N. C; Stanley Rowland, Asheville, N. C; J. G. Merrimon, Asheville, 
N. C; Reginald Rowland, Asheville, N. C; G. W. Epps, Asheville, N. C; M. M. Rowland, Arhng- 
ton, Florida. 

ROAD OPERATED 



From 


To 


Miles 


N. C. 


Total 


Asheville, N. C 


Weaverville, N. C 


8.7 


8.7 


(Mileage owned, 6.34.) 







CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



1920 



1921 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue,-- 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, N. C 



70,000.00 

11,041.01 

35,000.00 

5,520.50 

95,824.70 

15,114.31 

20,692.53 

3,263.80 

18,378.11 

37,417.50 

37,522.06 

104.56 

4,300.86 

4,312.88 

4,305.10 

40,786.05 

494.84 

199,252 

3,538.63 

2,326.35 

.0178 

929.15 



70,900.00 

11,182.96 

35,000.00 

5,520.50 

95,824.70 

15,114.31 

20,692.53 

3,263.80 

18,378.11 

35,244.98 

40,028.42 

4,783.44 

4,051.15 

4,600.97 

3,726.50 

28,818.45 

428.33 

183,064 

3,312.47 

2,700.03 

.01809 

831.50 



Employees: Number general officers, 4; office clerks, 1; 
foremen, 1; other trackmen, 3; other employees, 3; total 18. 



motormen, 3; conductors, 3; section 



ATLANTIC AND CAKOLINA RAILROAD 123 

Atlantic and Carolina Railroad Company 



HISTORY 

Organized April 21, 1914, under laws of North Carolina, chapter 61, Revisal 1905, B. Section 2549 
Revisal. 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President 


A. R. Tiirnbull 


Norfolk, Va. 


General Manager or Superintendent 


James E. Jerritt 


Kenansville, N. C. 
Norfolk, Va. 


Vice-Presi dent 


T. A. Hefty .. - . 


Kenansville, N. C. 









DIRECTORS 

A. R. Turnbull, Norfolk, Va.; Wm. J. Jones, Norfolk, Va.; T. A. Hefty, Kenansville, N. C; Jas. 
E. Jerritt, Kenansville, N. C; L. A. Beasley, Kenansville, N. C; H. D. WilHams, Kenansville, N. C; 
R. D. Johnson, Warsaw, N. C. 

ROAD OPERATED 



From 


To 


Miles 


N. C. 


Total 


Warsaw, N C. 


Kenansville, N. C. 


10 


10 









CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



1920 



1921 



Capital stock ._. 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 1 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total num.ber passengers carried earning revenue. -. 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, N. C 



10,000.00 


$ 10,000.00 


1,000.00 


1,000.00 


49,000.00 


49,000.00 


4,000.00 


4,900.00 


64,730.00 


64,730.00 


6,473.00 


6,473.00 


5,126.36 


5,126.36 


512.63 


512.63 


6,985.63 


6,985.63 


17,560.74 


18,963.29 


14.941.53 


13,937.60 


2,619.21 


5,025.69 


1,756.07 


1,896.32 


1,494.15 


1,393.76 


13,262.08 


15,538.83 


3,578.16 


2,718.30 


1,326.20 


1,553.88 


12,461 


8,360 


357.81 


$ 271.83 


720.50 


706. 16 


.0318 


.0356 


38.46 


226.26 



Employees: Number general officers, 6; office clerks, 1; station agents, 1; other station men 
1; enginemen, 1; conductors, 1; section foremen, 1; other trackmen, 4; total, 16. 



124 N. C. COEPOKATION COMMISSION 

Atlantic and Western Railroad Company 

HISTORY 

Organized March 7, 1899, under laws of North CaroHna. Private laws of North Carolina, chap- 
ter 363, session 1899; chapter 49, of volume 1, of Code of North Carolina. 





OFFICERS 




Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President 


H. C. Huffer, Jr. 


New York City 


General Manager or Superintendent 

Secretary and Treasurer 


H. P. Edwards 

W. R. Sullivan 

H. P.Edwards 


Sanford, N. C. 
New York Cit*^ 
Sanford, N. C. 







DIRECTORS 

H. C. Huflfer, Jr., 336 Madison Ave., New York City; Louis de Aillieries, Paris, France; W. A. Camp" 
bell, 366 Madison Ave., New York City; W. R. SulUvan, 366 Madison Ave., New York City; J. R. Rag- 
gett, Lillington, N. C; E. L. Howard, Sanford, N. C; J. W. Cunningham, Sanford, N. C; H. P. 
Edwards, Sanford, N. C; S. A. Boney, Lillington, N. C. , 

ROAD OPERATED 



From 


To 


Miles 


N. C. 


Total 


Sanford, N. C. 


LilHngton, N. C. 


24.0 


24.0 









CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



1920 



1921 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road.-- 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue. -- 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, N. C 



303,000.00 


$ 303,000.00 


12,625.00 


12,625.00 


303,000.00 


303,000.00 


12,625.00 


12,625.00 


555,808.65 


555,808.65 


23,158.69 


23,158.69 


48,374.78 


48,374.78 


2,015.61 


2,015.61 


25,174.30 


25,174.30 


43,842.77 


53,102.59 


62,557.33 


55,403.51 


18,714.56 


2,300.92 


1,826.75 


2,212.60 


2,606.55 


2,308.48 


35,492.15 


42,391.17 


7,857.08 


9,669.79 


1,478.84 


1,766.29 


22,890 


20,374 


327.38 


% 402.90 


493.54 


1,041.63 


.03 


.036 


1,536.12 


2,268.44 



Employees: Number general officers, 5; office clerks, 3; station agents, 5; enginemen, 1; firemen,. 
1; conductors, 1; other trainmen, 1; machinists, 2; carpenters, 1; telegraph operators, 0; section fore- 
men, 2; other trackmen, 12; other employees, 2; total, 36. 



BLACK MOUNTAIN KAILWAY 

Black Mountain Railway Company 



125 



HISTORY 

Organized April 21, 1910, under laws of North Carolina. 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President 


J. Bis Ray 

L. H. Phetteplace 


Burnsville, N. C. 















DIRECTORS 

Ernest A. Smith, New York City; J. Bis Ray, Burnsville, N. C; Geo. T. Wafford, Johnson City, 
Tenn.; A. B. Couch, Johnson City, Tenn.; H. G. Morison, Johnson City, Tenn.; John W. Saunders, 
Johnson City, Tenn.; I. McQuilkin, Johnson City, Tenn.; Edw. C. Bailey, New York City. 

ROAD OPERATED 





From 


To 


Miles 




N. C. 


Total 


Kona, N. C 

Bowditch 


Eskota, N. C 




25.50 









( 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



1920 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue. __ 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, N. C 



50,000.00 


$ 50,000.00 


1,960.78 


1,960.78 


700,000.00 


675,000.00 


27,450.98 


26,471.00 


436,626.31 


436,640.83 


17,122.60 


17,123.17 


7,313.78 


7,310.28 


286.81 


286.67 


17,409.41 


17,409.84 


109,737.22 


89,224.78 


101,124.82 


91,767.16 


8,612.40 


2,542.38 


4,303.42 


3,499.01 


3,965.68 


3,598.71 


91,281.78 


71,985.76 


14,375.37 


14,116.80 


3,579.68 


2,822.97 


43.883 


30,751 


563.74 


$ 553.60 


4,080.07 


3,163.11 


3.08 


.35 


1,247.21 


1,420.03 



Employees: Number general officers, 2; station agents, 3; other station men, 1; enginemen, 2; 
firemen, 2; conductors, 2; other trainmen, 4; other shopmen, 3; section foremen, 3; other trackmeft; 11 ; 
total, 33. $■ ■ 



126 



N. C. COEPOKATION COMMISSION 



Bonlee and Western Railway Company 

HISTORY 

The Bonlee and Western Railway Company was organized October 12, 1908, under laws of North 
Carolina. 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President 


Arthur Ross 


Asheboro N C 


General Manager or Superintendent 

Secretary and Treasurer ... 


M. H. Birkhead....-- 

I. H. Dunlap 


Asheboro, N. C. 
Bonlee, N. C. 









DIRECTORS 

D. B. McCrary, Asheboro, N. C; C. M. Andrews, Bonlee, N. C; J. H. Dunlap, Bonlee, N. C. 
I. H. Dunlap, Bonlee, N. C; L. F. Ross, Asheboro, N. C. 

ROAD OPERATED 



From 


To 


Miles 


N.C. 


Total 


Bonlee, N. C. 


Bennett; N. C 


10.35 


10.35 







CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



1920 



1921 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue... 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, N. C 



61,700.00 

5,949.85 

59,610.43 

5,748.35 

17,568.33 

1,694.14 

7,442.49 

21,232.75 

21,008.91 

223.84 

2,047.51 

2,025.93 

19,497.25 

1,629.50 

1,880.16 

5,326 

157.13 

106.00 

.20 

804.84 



61,700.00 
5,961.35 

57,557.43 
5,560.81 

18,197.17 
1,748.50 
7,309.31 

13,061.66 

15,038.84 



1,261.99 

1,453.03 

10,642.06 

963.11 

1,028.21 

3,020 

93.05 



.31 

494.45 



Employees: Number general officers, 7; station 
1; other trackmen, 2; total, 15. 



mts, 2; enginemen, 1; firemen,!; conductors 



CAROLINA AND NORTHEASTERN RAILROAD 

Carolina and Northeastern Railroad Company 

HISTORY 

Organized January 8, 1917, under laws of North Carolina, House Bill 274; Senate Bill 18. 

OFFICERS 



127 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President _*_ _ 

General Manager or Superintendent 

Secretary and Treasurer 


Vacancy 

H. Stuart Lewis 

G. G. McCann 


Suffolk, Va. 
Franklin, Va. 



DIRECTORS 

H. Stuart Lewis, Suffolk, Va.; Thomas Phillip Hammer, Philadelphia, Pa.; W. L. Long, Roanoke 
Rapids, N. C; Thos. B. Gay, Richmond, Va.; Arthur Woolford, Suffolk, Va.; Walter C. Rawles, 
New York, N. Y. 

ROAD OPERATED 



From 


To 


Miles 


N.C. 


Total 


Gumberry, N. C. 


Lasker, N. C.. ...-.- 


15 


15 









CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



1920 



1921 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue.-. 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, N. C 



300,000.00 


$ . 300,000.00 


20,000.00 


20,000.00 


199,000.00 


195,500.00 


13,266.00 


13,033.33 


441,459.43 


412,371.44 


29,429.96 


27,491.43 


19,402.97 


18,790.79 


1,293.53 


1,252.72 


30,723.49 


28,744.15 


26,314.10 


24,596.52 


24,402.01 


34,939.46 


1,912.09 


*10,342.94 


1,754.27 


1,639.77 


1,626.80 


2,329.30 


25,569.96 


23,750.78 


352.42 


394.71 


1,704.66 


1,583.39 


1,210 


670 


23.61 


$ 11.16 


391.72 


451.03 


.03 


.017 


740.27 


799.03 



Employees: Number general officers, 6; office clerks, 2; station agents, 3; enginemen, 1; fire- 
men, 1; conductors, 1; machinists, 1; other shopmen, 1; section foremen, 2; other trackmen, 18; toal, 36. 



"Deficit. 



128 



N. C. COBPORATION COMMISSION 



Carolina and Northwestern Railway Company 

HISTORY 

Carolina and Northwestern Railway Company, organized July 18, 1895, under the Private Laws of 
North Carolina, 1895, Chapter 190, p. 306; 1901, Chapter 114, p. 301, and the laws of South CaroHna, 
Volume 23, State Act No. 337, p. 567, approved February 17, 1900. 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President 


Fairfax Harrison 


Washington, D. C. 




L. E. Jeffries 


Washington, D. C. 


Vice-President 

Vice-President 


F. S. Wynn 

D. S. Abernethy 


Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 




G. E. Mauldin . . 


Washington, D. C. 




E. F. Parham. . . .... 


Washington, D. C. 




L. E. Jeffries . . . . . 


Washington, D. C. 




E. H. Kemper 


Washington, D. C. 







DIRECTORS 



WilHam A. Barber, New York City, N. Y.; F. S. Wynn, Washington, D. C; Fairfax Harrison, 
Washington, D.C.; T. H. White, Chester, S. C; S. H. Hardin, Chester, S. C; J. R. Hart, York, 
S.C: L.F.Long, Newton, N.C.; D. S. Abernethy, Washington, D. C; A. K. Winget, Gastonia, N. C. 



CAROLINA AND NORTHWESTERN RAILWAY 



129 



COMPARATIVE GENERAL BALANCE SHEET— ASSET SIDE 



Balance at 

Beginning of 

Year 1920 


Item 


Balance at 

Beginning of 

Year 1921 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1921 


$ 3,887,917.55 


Investments: 

Investment in road and equipment 

Miscellaneous physical property 


$ 3,893,876.52 
500.00 

20.00 
42,128.63 


1 3,873,819.24 
500.00 


20.00 


Other Investments 

Stocks - - - - - - - - - - - 


20.00 


42,128.63 




42,128.63 




Total investments 

Current Assets: 
Cash 

Traffic and car-service balances receivable.. 
Net balance receivable from agents and 

conductors 

Miscellaneous accounts receivable 

Material and supphes 




$ 3,930,066.18 


$ 3,936,525.15 


$ 3,916,467.87 


$ 2,371.98 
9.98 

65.00 
500.00 


$ 70,466.42 
15,665.22 

6,102.98 
12,249.87 
69,869.58 


$ 116,976.79 
7,658.01 

1,669.39 
105,502.41 
62,326.78 


$ 2,946.96 


1 174,354.07 


$ 294,133.38 




Deferred Assets: 






S 395.10 
445,678.10 


$ 499.85 


$ 186,930.48 












S 186,930.48 


$ 446,073.20 


$ 499.85 




Unadjusted Debits: 
Rents and insurance premiums paid in ad- 






$ 555.85 
165,477.60 




$ 181,379.62 




1 86,054.35 








$ 181,379.62 


$ 166,033.45 


$ 86,054.35 








$ 4,301,323.24 


$ 4,722,985.87 


% 4,297,155.45 









130 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



COMPARATIVE GENERAL BALANCE SHEET-LIABILITY SIDE 



Balance at 

Beginning of 

Year 1920 



1,404,250.00 



% 1,404,250.00 



2,071,000.00 



2,071,000.00 



$ 498,621.00 
43.13 

2,479.82 

258,875.00 

100.00 

3,602.28 



$ 


763,721.23 


$ 


209,855.36 


$ 


209,855.36 



$ 9,838.31 

49,966.87 

7.35 



59,812.53 



822.10 



$ 822.10 
208,137.98 



207,315. 



4,301,323.24 



Item 



Stock: 
Capital stock. 



Total stock. 



Long-term Debt: 
Funded debt unmatured . 

Total long-term debt . 



Current Liabilities: 

Loans and bills payable 

Traffic and car-service balances payable 

Audited accounts and wages payable 

Miscellaneous accounts payable 

Interest matured unpaid 

Funded debt matured unpaid 

Unmatured interest accrued 



Total current liabilities . 



Deferred Lialilities: 
Other deferred liabilitie 



Total deferred liabilities . 



Unadjusted Credits: 
Tax liability.-.- 

Operating reserves 

Accrued depreciation — road 

Accrued depreciation — equipment . 
Other unadjusted credits 



Total unadjusted credits. 



Corporate Surplus: 
Additions to property through income and 
surplus _ 



Total appropriated surplus . 
Profit and loss debit balance. .. 



Total corporate surplus debit- 
Grand total 



Balance at 

Beginning of 

Year 1921 



1,404,250.00 



$ 


1,404,250.00 


s 


1,404,250.00 


$ 


2,071,000.00 


s 


2.071,000.00 


$ 


2,071,000.00 


$ 


2,071,000.00 



497,402.75 

114,973.88 

65,940.69 

13,040.66 

362,425.00 

100.00 

2,262.50 



4,449.71 
16,201.53 



54,251.36 
401,439.77 



435,039.89 



822.10 



822.10 
317,075.46 



316,253.36 



4,722,985.87 



Balance at 

Close of Year 

1921 



1,404,250.00 



497,210.73 

101,052.49 

51,505.87 

11.532.46 

465,975.00 

100.00 

2,262.50 



% 


1,056,145.48 


$ 


1,129,639.05 


$ 


72,803.86 


$ 


6,242.33 


$ 


72,803.86 


$ 


6,242.33 



6,519.30 
5,322.61 



52,545.33 

40,444.83 



91,793.47 



1,168.45 



1,168.45 
406,937.85 



405,769.40 



4.297,155.45 



CAEOLINA AND NORTHWESTERN RAILWAY 
ROAD OPERATED AT CLOSE OF YEAR 



131 





Termini Between Which 
Road Extends 


1920-1921 


Name of Road or Track 


Miles of 
road. 


Miles of 
yard track 
and sid- 
ings, etc. 


Total 




Chester, S. C, to Edgemont, N. C. 
Newton to Hickory, N. C 

Total 


124.30 
9.20 


*24.76 


149.06 


Trackage rights— Southern Ry. 


9.20 








133.50 


24.76 


158.26 









*.07 miles less than in 1920. 
MILES OF ROAD AT CLOSE OF YEAR— BY STATES AND TERRITORIES (SINGLE TRACK) 





Road Operated by Respondent 


State 


Main 
Line 


Line Operated 

Under Trackage 

Rights 


Total Mileage 
Operated 


North Carolina 


87.30 
37.00 


9.20 


96.50 


South Carolina 


37.00 








Total mileage (single track) 


124.30 


9.20 


133.50 







RAILWAY OPERATING REVENUES-ENTIRE 


LINE 






1920 


1921 


Class of Railway Operating Revenues 


Total 

Amount of 

Revenue for 

the Year 


Comparison 
with Total 
Revenue of 
Preceding 

Year 
Increase 


Total 

Amount of 

Revenue for 

the Year 


Comparison 
With Total 
Revenue of 
Preceding 

Year 
Increase 


Freight 


S 517,112.32 

136,666.60 

743.16 

11,776.85 

7,257.91 

5,418.61 

555.44 


$ 53,679.36 

21,811.59 

49.21 

5,642.52 

192.27 

216.15 

1.94 


$ 541,920.85 

109,555.54 

817.99 

12,190.03 

8,395.78 

4,856.20 

686.65 


$ 24,808.53 


Passenger _ _ . 


*27, 111.06 


Excess baggage 

Mail 


*74.83 
*413.18 


Express _ .. ._ 


1,137.87 


Switching... . _. 


*562.41 


Special service train 


*131.21 






Total rail-line transportation revenue 


$ 679,530.89 


$ 81,593.04 


1 678,423.04 


$ *1, 107.85 


Station, train and boat privileges. 


$ 300.00 
53.40 
2,474.21 
9,962.62 
1,125.13 
1,123.89 


5.48 
1,247.99 
6,440.95 
1,863.58 
1,180.71 


$ 300.00 

51.20 

5,435.07 

4,352.63 

748.65 




Parcel room. 


*1 20 


Storage— freight... . ... 


2,960.86 


Demurrage.. _. 


*5 609 99 


Rents of buildings and other property 

Miscellaneous . 


*1,125.13 
*375 24 






Total incidental operating revenue. . 


$ 12,788.99 


$ 4,650.13 


$ 10,887.55 


$ *1,901.44 


Total railway operating revenues 


$ 632,319.88 


$ 86,243.17 


S 689,310.50 


$ *3,009.29 



"Denotes decrease. 



132 



N. C. COEPOEATION COMMISSION 



RAILWAY OPERATING REVENUES— WITH IN THE STATE 





1920 


1921 


Class of Railway Operating Revenues 


Total 

Amount of 

Revenue for 

the Year 

Intra and 

Interstate 

Traffic 


On Intra- 
state Traffic 


On Inter- 
state Traffic 


Total 


Freight 


$ 425,576.15 

115,480.76 

640.30 

10,021.76 

6,618.57 

4,518.36 

401.15 

260.58 

46.38 

2,149.10 

8,653.53 

977. 29 

977.09 


$ 152,858.87 

76,480.35 

672.23 

10,971.03 

7,635.12 

4,024.29 

686. 65 

260.58 

42.10 

4,449.13 

3,559.17 

611.61 


$ 293,358.76 
16,050.25 


$ 446 217 63 


Passenger 

Excess baggage 


92,530.60 
672.23 


Mail 




10 971.03 


Express 


7,635.12 


Switching 


4,024.29 


Special service train 




686. 65 


Station, train, and boat privileges 


260.58 






42.10 






4,449.13 


Demurrage 

Rents of buildings and other property 




3,559.17 
611.61 










Total railway operating revenues 


$ 574,366.44 


S 262,251.13 


S 309,409.01 


% 571,660.14 



RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES— ENTI RE LINE 



Name of Railway Operating Expense Account 


Amount of Operating 
Expenses for the Year 


1920 


1921 


I. Maintenance of Way and Structures: 

Superintendence.. . . . . .. 


■ 

S 8,324.15 

154,736.53 

35,849.13 

22,112.65 

840.75 

5,423.12 


$ 8,033.01 


Maintaining roadway and track 


123,172.71 


Maintaining track structures 


31,111.43 


Maintaining ancillary structures .. . .. ... 


6,081.69 


Injuries to persons 


342.03 


Other way and structure expense 


5,620.04 






Total . 


$ 257,286.33 


S 173,676.85 






Maintaining joint tracks, yards, and other facilities — Dr. 


$ 1,129.87 


$ 1,979.33 






Total maintenance of way and structures . .. . 


S 258,416.20 


$ 175,656.18 






II. Maintenance of Equipment: 

Superintendence . . . 


.S 2,884.34 

458.26 

55,886.42 

2,337.87 

31,644.56 

2,538.09 

786.50 

351.00 


$ 2,940.00 




862.16 


Locomotive repairs... ..l. . 


38,917.17 




12,711.68 


Car repairs . . . 


19,911.36 


Car depreciation and retirements ... 


2,564.55 


Work equipment repairs 


11,463.21 


Work equipment depreciation and retirements 


366.50 



CAKOLINA AND NOKTHWESTERN RAILWAY 



133 



RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES— ENTIRE UNE— Continued 



Name of Railway Operating Expense Account 



Amount of Operating 
Expenses for the Year 



1920 



1921 



II. Maintenance of Equipment — Continued 

Injuries to persons 

Other equipment expenses 



TotaL . 



Total maintenance of equipment . 



III. Traffic: 
Traffic expenses . 



IV. Transportation — Rail Line: 

Superintendence and dispatching 

Station service 

Train enginemen and motormen 

Fuel for train locomotives 

Other train locomotive supplies and expenses. 

Trainmen 

Train supplies and expenses 

Injuries to persons 

Loss and damage 

Other casualty expenses 

Other rail transportation expenses 



Total . 



Operating joint yards and terminals — Dr. 
Operating joint yards and terminals — Cr. . 
Operating joints tracks and facilities — Dr. 

Total transportation — rail line 



v. General: 

Administration 

Insurance— general 

Valuation expenses 

Other general expenses . 

Total 



General joint facihty expenses — Cr 

Grand total railway operating expenses. 



$ 


108.00 


$ 


56.95 




902.32 




1,202.29 


s 


97,897.36 


1 


80,881.97 


% 


97,897.36 


$ 


80,881.97 


% 


6,813.16 


$ 


8,840.71 


$ 


19,670.71 


1 


16,088.12 




73,651.23 




46,356.68 




40,689.21 




32.564.01 




92,787.69 




88,471.85 




13,068.79 




10,860.28 




58,411.95 




45,278.50 




6,469.03 




4,440.98 




3,000.23 




1,196.95 




17,483.14 




9,612.12 




5,812.77 




4,732.84 




4,026.70 




3,210.10 


S 305,071.45 


$ 


260,418.53 


$ 


47,828.54 


$ 


43,283.35 




2,252.55 




2,355.79 




149.79 




198.38 


$ 350,797.23 


$ 


301,544.47 


$ 


31,292.20 


$ 


32,327.87 




86.30 




11.02 




203.44 




71.99 




1,915.45 




1,972.56 


$ 


33,497.39 


$ 


34,383.44 


33,497.39 


34,383.44 


$ 747,421.34 


$ 


601,306.77 



Operating ratio (ratio of operating expenses to operating revenues), 104.04 % for 1920; 87. 23 for 1921. 



i 



134 



N. C. COKPOKATION COMMISSION 
REVENUE FREIGHT CARRIED DURING THE YEAR 



Commodity 


Number of 
Carloads 


Number of 

Tons 
(2,000 lbs.) 


Number of 
Carloads 


Number of 

Tons 
(2.000 lbs.) 


Products of Agriculture: 
Wheat 


44 

32 

35 

20 

108 

103 

156 

1 

1,719 

358 

14 

33 

12 

7 

6 

23 


1,594 

673 

672 

461 

1,680 

1,616 


51 
38 
32 
3 
53 


1,603 




1,230 


Oats 


697 


Other grain 


38 


Flour and meal 


793 


Other mill products 


838 


Hay, straw, and alfalfa 


2,170 1 204 


2 536 


Tobacco 


33 

19,785 
6,099 
205 
453 
188 
127 
76 
289 






Cotton 


2,072 

515 

4 

37 

9 


20,515 


Cotton seed and products, except oil 

Citrus fruits 


9,398 
56 


Other fresh fruits 


456 


Potatoes - 


126 








3 
32 


36 




508 






Total 


2,671 


36,118 


3,109 


38,830 






Products of Animals: 
Horses and mules 


17 

48 

3 

5 

1 
1 
1 
1 
2 


193 
411 
23 
92 
30 
12 
10 

23 


8 

30 

4 

1 


86 


Cattle and calves ..- . 


333 


Hogs 


40 


Fresh meats 


12 


Other packing-house products 




Poultry 






Butter and cheese 


1 
2 

1 


15 


Hides and leather 


27 


Other products of animals 


17 






Total . 


79 


802 


47 


530 






Products of Mines: 


1,310 

6 

11 

3 

412 

5 

1 

21 

28 


65,764 

158 

677 

84 

13,626 

184 

29 

513 

830 


1,139 


56,651 




51 


Coke 














253 
33 
2 

27 
17 


11,048 


Crude petroleum 

Asphaltum 

Salt 


883 

61 

651 




460 






Total 


1,797 


81,865 


1,473 


69,805 






Products of Forests: 
Logs, posts, poles, and cordwood 


780 
107 
98 

2,229 
93 


19,650 
2,919 
2,460 

50,943 
1,994 


389 
96 


9,092 


Ties 


2,549 






Lumber, timber, box shocks, staves, and 


1,700 
59 


40,372 




900 






Total 


3,307 


77,966 


2,244 


52,913 



CAROLINA AND NORTHWESTERN RAILWAY 



135 



REVENUE FREIGHT CARRIED DURING THE \EkR— Continued 



Commodity 



Manufactures and Miscellaneous: 

Refined petroleum and its products 

Vegetable oils 

Sugar, sirup, glucose, and molasses 

Iron, pig and bloom 

Rails and fastenings 

Bar and sheet iron, structural iron, and 



iron pipe 

Other metals, pig, bar, and sheet 

Castings, machinery, and boilers 

Cement 

Brick and artificial stone 

Lime and plaster 

Sewer pipe and drain tile 

Agricultural implements and vehicles, 

other than automobiles 

Automobiles and autotrucks 

Household goods and secondhand furniture 

Furniture (new) ._. 

Beverages 

Ice... 



Fertilizers (all kinds) 

Paper, printed matter, and books 

Chemicals and explosives 

Textiles 

Canned goods (all canned food products), 
Other manufactures and miscellaneous 

Total 



Grand total, carload traffic. 
Merchandise— all L. C. L. freight - 



Grand total, carload and L.C.L. traffic. 



Number of 
Carloads 



375 

4 
82 
11 
27 

54 

12 

238 

103 

327 

55 

79 



100 

90 

622 

2 

52 

725 

3 



122 
5 



4,061 



11,915 



11,915 



Number of 

Tons 
(2000 lbs.) 



8,551 
101 

1,194 
382 
584 

1,687 
288 
3,470 
1,680 
11,349 
1,141 
1,262 

1,137 

836 

2,352 

5,836 

20 

824 

19,306 

62 



1,702 

90 

15,537 



79,391 



276,142 
41,921 



318,063 



Number of 
Carloads 



627 
3 

79 
4 
2 

16 

9 

116 

71 
217 

38 

55 



46 

26 

544 



11 
638 

4 
125 

2 
502 



3,137 



10,010 



10,010 



Number of 

Tons 
(2000 lbs.) 



15,119 

92 

2,347 

106 

40 

302 
215 
1,825 
2,245 
7,287 
1,061 
926 

18 

358 

218 

4,181 



133 
11,272 



1,309 

39 

5,659 



54,838 



216,916 
48,172 



265, ( 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— WITHIN THE STATE 



Item 


Amount 1920 


Amount 1921 


Average mileage of road operated 


miles 


96.50 


96.50 


Train-miles: 

Freight^ordinary 


46,604 
1,142 


34,356 


Freight— light 


409 








Freight— total 


47,746 

53,437 

27,632 

133 


34,765 


Passenger ... 


53,287 


Mixed 


27,544 


Special 


364 










128,948 


115,960 








Work service. 


3,370 


694 







136 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— WITHI N THE ST ^^E— Continued 



Item 


Amount 1920 


Amount 1921 


Locomotive-miles : 

Freight— principal 

Freight— light 


47,746 
828 


34,356 
409 


Freight— total - ----- 


48,574 


34,765 






53,437 
151 


53,287 
111 








Passenger — total 


53,588 


53 398 






Mixed train — principal 


27,632 
16 


27,592 
74 


Mixed train — light 






Mixed train — total 


27,648 


27 666 






Special— principal 

Special— light 


133 
41 


364 








174 


364 








41,591 


38,074 








171,575 


154,267 








3,370 


694 






Car-miles: 


434,627 
116,984 


359,877 




85,200 






Sum of loaded and empty 


551,611 
45,029 


445,077 


Freight train — caboose 


35,217 






Freight train — total 


596, 640 


480,294 






Passenger train — passenger _ - 


144,814 


118,703 




78 


Passenger train — other 


49,451 


53,660 








194,265 


172,441 








84,035 
22,944 
27,632 


121,265 




47,500 




27,544 






Mixed train — total 


134,611 


196,309 






Special train — freight — loaded 


656 
52 
26 


660 




260 










Special train — total - 


734 


920 






Total transportation service 


926,250 


849,964 




8,311 


3,428 







CAROLIJs'A AND NORTHWESTERN RAILWAY 



137 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— WITHIN THE ST ATE— Continued 



Item 



Amount 1920 



Amount 1921 



Freight Service: 

Tons — revenue freight 

Tons— nonrevenue freight 

Tons — total 

Ton-miles — revenue freight 

Ton-miles — nonrevenue freight 

Ton-miles — total 

Passenger Service: 

Passengers carried — revenue 

Passenger-miles — revenue 

Revenues and Expenses: 

Freight revenue 

Passenger revenue 

Passenger service trai n revenue 

Oper ati ng revenues 

Operating expenses 

Net operati ng revenues 

Averages per Mile of Road: 

Freight-train miles 

Passenger-train miles 

Mixed-train miles 

Special-train miles 

Transportation service train-miles 

Work-train miles 

Locomotive- miles — transportation 

Freight service car-miles 

Passenger service car-miles 

Freight revenue 

Passenger service train revenue. _ 

Operating revenues 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenues 

Ton-miles— revenue freight 

Ton-miles— all freight 

Passenger- miles — revenue 

Averages per Train-mile: 

Loaded freight car-miles — freight trains 

Loaded freight car-miles — mixed trains 

Empty freight car-miles — freight trains 

Empty freight car-miles — mixed trains 

Ton-miles^re venue freight 

Ton-miles — all freight 

Passenger train car-miles — passenger trains 

Passenger train car-miles — mixed trains 

Revenue passenger-miles 

Freight revenue 

Passenger service train revenue 

Operating revenues 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenues 

— 20 



267, 173 
15,190 



222,673 
17,769 



282,363 



240,442 



7,707,077 
395,293 



7.028,452 

487,294 



8,102,370 



7,515,746 



178,999 
3,788,045 



131,220 
2,636,240 



425,576.15 
115,480.76 
132,761.39 



446,217.63 
92,530.60 
111,808.98 



574,366.44 
597,563.05 



571.660.14 
477,786.93 



23,196.61 



93,873.21 



495 
554 

286 

1 

1.336 

35 

1,778 

7,298 

2,300 

4,410.12 

1,375.77 

5,951.99 

6,192.36 

240.38 

79,866 

83,962 

39,254 



9.10 

3.04 

2.45 

.83 

102.25 

107.49 

3.63 

1.00 

46.73 

5.65 

1.64 

4.45 

4.63 



360 
552 

285 

4 

1,202 

7 

1,599 

6,733 

2,075 

4,624.02 

1,158.64 

5,923.94 

4,951.16 

972.78 

72,834 

77,883 

27,319 



10.35 
4.40 
2.45 
1.72 
120.26 
128.60 
3.^24 

i.'oo 

46.13 

7. 
1. 



64 



138 



N. C. COEPORATIOX COMMISSION 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS-WITHIN THE ST /KTE-Continued 



Item 



Amount 1920 



Amount 1921 



Averages per Locomotive-mile: 

Train-miles — freight trains 

Car- miles— freight trains 

Train-miles— passenger trains . .. 

Car-miles— passenger trains 

Train-miles— mixed trains 

Car- miles— mixed trains 

Train-miles — special trains 

Car-miles — special trains 



Averages per Loaded Freight Car-mile: 

Ton-miles — revenue freight 

Ton-miles — all freight 

Freight revenue 



Averages per Car-mile — Passenger: 

Passenger- miles — revenue 

Passenger revenue 



Miscellaneous Averages: 

Miles hauled — revenue freight 

Miles hauled — nonrevenue freight _ 

Miles hauled — all freight 

Miles carried — revenue passengers . 

Revenue per ton of freight 

Revenue per ton-mile of freight-.. 

Revenue per passenger 

Revenue per passenger-mile 

Operating ratio 



.98 


1.00 


12.28 


13.82 


1.00 


1.00 


3.63 


3.23 


1.00 


1.00 


4.87 


7.10 


.76 


1.00 


4.22 


2.53 


14.86 


14.61 


15.81 


15.62 


.82053 


$ .92741 


21.39 


18.02 


.66966 


1 . 63236 


28.85 


31.56 


26.02 


27.42 


28.69 


31.26 


21.16 


20.09 


. 59289 


$ 2.00391 


.05522 


.06349 


. 64515 


.70516 


.03049 


.03510 


104.04 


% 83.59 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS-ENTIRE LINE 



Item 




Amount 1920 


Amount 1921 


Average mileage of road operated 


miles 


133.50 


133.50 


Train-.miles: 

Freight— ordinary 

Freight— light . 


63,032 
1,142 


46,465 
409 


Freight— total .- 


64, 174 

80,521 

27,632 

133 


46,874 




80,300 


Mixed 


27,544 




364 










172,460 


155,082 










3,830 


789 








Locomotive-miles: 

Freight— principal 


64, 174 
1,104 


46,465 
409 








Freight- total 


65,278 


46,874 









CAROLINA AND NORTHWESTERN RAILWAY 
STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— ENTIRE LINE-Contini 



139 



.ed 



Item 


Amount 1920 


Amount 1921 


LocoMOTivE-Mii.E,s— Continued 
Passenger — principal 


80,521 
201 


80,345 




148 






Passenger— total 


80,722 


80,493 


Mixed train— principal 


27,632 
16 


27,592 
74 








27.648 


27,666 






Special— principal 

Special— light 


133 

41 


364 


Special— total 


174 


364 


Train switching 


55.455 


50,765 








229,277 


206, 162 






Work service 


3,830 


789 


Car-miles: 


579,503 
155,978 


479,837 




113,600 






Sum of loaded and empty 


735,481 
60,039 


593,437 


Freight train — caboose 


46,956 






Freight train — total 


795,520 


640,393 






Passenger train— passenger 

Passenger train, sleeping, parlor, and observation 


217,220 


178,046 

78 


Passenger train— other . _ .._ _ ... _ 


74,176 


80,486 








291.396 


258,610 








84.035 
22,944 
27,632 


121,265 


Mixed train— freight— empty 


47,500 
27,544 








134,611 


196,309 






Special train — freight — loaded 


656 


660 




260 












920 








Total transportation service 


1,222,261 


1,096,232 








9,463 


3,904 






Freight Service: 


318,063 
18,083 


265,088 




19,964 






Tons— total 


336, 146 


285,052 


v 





140 



N. C. COKPORATION COMMISSION 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— ENTIRE UNE-Co7itinued 



Item 



Freight Service — Continued 

Ton-miles — revenue freight 

Ton-miles — nonrevenue freight 

Ton-miles — total 

Passenger Service: 

Passengers carried — revenue 

Passenger-miles — revenue 

Revenues and Expenses: 

Freight revenue 

Passenger revenue 

Passenger service trai n revenue 

Operating revenues. 

Operating expenses . 

Net operating revenues 

Averages per Mile of Road: 

Freight-train miles . 

Passenger-train miles 

Mixed-train miles 

Special-train miles 

Transportation service train-miles 

Work-train miles 

Locomotive-miles — transportation 

Freight service car-miles 

Passenger service car-miles 

Freight revenue 

Passenger service train revenue 

Operating revenues 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenues , 

Ton-miles — revenue freight 

Ton-miles — all freight 

Passenger miles— revenue 

Averages per Train-mile: 

Loaded freight car-miles — freight trains 

Loaded freight car-miles — mixed trains 

Empty freight car-miles — freight trains 

Empty freight car-miles — mixed trains 

Ton-miles — revenue freight 

Ton-miles — all freight 

Passenger train car-miles — passenger trains 

Passenger train car-miles — mixed trains 

Revenue passenger-miles 

Freight revenue 

Passenger service trai n revenue 

Operati ng revenues 

Operati ng expenses 

Net operating revenues 

Averages per Locomotive-mile: 

Train-miles — freight trains 

Car-miles — freight trains 



Amount 1920 



9,175,091 
470,587 



9,645,678 


8,957,794 


211,683 
4,479,712 


154,968 
3,117,597 


$ 


517,112.32 
136,666.60 
156,444.52 


$ 


541,920.85 
109,555.54 
130,954.34 


$ 


692,319.88 
747,421.34 


$ 


689.310.59 
601,306.77 


$ 


55,101.46 


$ 


88,003.82 



481 

603 

207 

1 

1,292 

29 

1.719 

6,765 

2,390 

3,873.50 

1,171.87 

5,185.92 

5,598.66 

412.75 

68,727 

72,252 

33,556 



9.03 
3.04 
2.43 



105.07 
3.62 
1.00 
41.42 
5.63 
1.45 
4.01 
4.33 
.32 



.98 
12.19 



Amount 1921 



CAKOLINA AND NORTHWESTERN RAILWAY 
STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— ENTIRE LINE— Continued 



141 



Item 



Amount 1921 



Averages per Locomotive-mile — Continued 

Train-miles — passenger trains 

Car-miles — passenger trains 

Train-miles — mixed trains 

Car-miles^mixed trains 

Train-miles — special trains 

Car-miles— special trains 

Averages per Loaded Freight Car-mile: 

Ton-miles — revenue freight 

Ton-miles — all freight 

Freight revenue 

Averages per Car-mile — Passenger: 

Passenger-miles — revenue 

Passenger revenue 

Miscellaneous Averages: 

Miles hauled — revenue freight 

Miles hauled — nonre venue freight 

Miles hauled — all freight 

Miles carried— revenue passengers 

Revenue per ton of freight 

Revenue per ton-mile of freight 

Revenue per passenger 

Revenue per passenger-mile 

Operating ratio 



1.00 


1.00 


3.61 


3.21 


LOO 


1.00 


4.87 


7.10 


.76 


1.00 


4.22 


2.53 


13.83 


13.92 


14.54 


14.90 


.77933 


$ .90155 


18.30 


15.16 


.55816 


$ .53268 


28.85 


31.56 


26.02 


29.58 


28.69 


31.42 


21.16 


20.12 


.62582 


$ 2.04305 


.05636 


.06476 


.64562 


.70696 


.03051 


.03514 


107.96 


% 87.23 



142 



N. C. CORPOEATION COMMISSION 



EQUIPMENT OWNED OR LEASED IN SERVICE OF THE COMPANY 





1920 


1921 


Class of Equipment 


Number 
Fully 
Owned 


Tractive 
Power 
,000 lbs. 


Number 
Fully 
Owned 


Tractive 
Power 
,000 lbs. 


Locomotives 


13 


312 


10 


248.1 






Tot^l 


13 


312 


10 


248.1 






Freight-train Cars 


Number 
Fully 
Owned 


Aggregate 

Capacity 

Tons 


Number 
Fully 
Owned 


Aggregate 

Capacity 

Tons 




38 

33 

1 

9 

5 


760 

815 

20 

ISO 


37 

31 

1 

8 

4 


740 


Flat cars . - . . . 


820 




25 




160 












All classes of freight-train cars 


86 




81 


1,745 


Passenger-train Cars 


Number 
Fully 
Owned 


Total 
Seating 
Capacity 


Number 
Fully 
Owned 


Total 
Seating 
Capacity 


Coaches - . - - 


12 
3 
3 

2 
3 


744 
93 


12 
3 
2 
2 
3 
1 


744 




93 


Other combination cars 




Parlor cars 


64 


64 


Baggage and express cars 

Other passenger-train cars 
















All classes of passenger-train cars 


23 


901 


23 


901 






Company Service Equipment 


Number 
Fully 
Owned 




Number 
Fully 
Owned 






4 

1 

1 

15 




3 

1 

1 

16 




Ballast cars - 


























21 


21 










All classes of cars in service 


130 


125 











TAXES ON RAILWAY PROPERTY 





Amount 

Charged to 

"Railway Tax 

Accruals" 

In Income 


Amount 
Assunied by 
Corporation 


Amount 
Assumed by 
U. S. R. A. 


Amount 

Charged to 

"Railway Tax 

Accruals" 

In Income 


Other than U. S. Government Taxes 

N orth Carolina 

South Carolina 


$ 10,549.57 
6.216.96 


$ 8,616.73 
4,967.87 




1,932.84 
1,249.09 


$ 14,086.48 
6.184.63 


Total 

U. S. Government Taxes— Kind 
Income - _ _ 


$ 16,766.53 

$ 1,033.72 
570.00 


$ 13,584.60 
570.00 




3.181.93 
1,033.72 


$ 20.271.11 


Capital stock . - _. 


1.039.50 








Total U. S. Government Taxes 


$ 1,603.72 


$ 570.00 




1.033.72 


1 1,039.50 




$ 18,370.25 


$ 14,154.60 




4,215.65 


$ 21,310.61 







CAROLINA AND NORTHWESTERN RAILWAY 



143 



EMPLOYEES AND THEIR COM PENS ATIC N 



Class of Employees 



General officers, S3,000 p. a. and upwards 

General officers, below 13,000 per annum 

Division officeis, $3,000 p. a. and upwards _.. 

Division officers, below 13,000 per annum 

Clerks, $900 p. a. and upwards 

Clerks, below $900 per annum 

Messengers and attendants 

M. W. & S. foremen 

Section foremen 

General foremen— M. E. department 

Gang and other foremen — M. E. department. 

Machinists 

Boiler makers 

Blacksmiths 

Carpenters 

Painters and upholsterers 

Car repairers 

Other skilled laborers 

Mechanics' helpers and apprentices '. 

Section men 

Other unskilled laborers 

Train dispatchers and directors 

Telegrapher-clerks 

Agent telegraphers 

Station agents (nontelegraphers) 

Station service employees 

Enginehouse-men 

Road freight engineers and motormen 

Road freight firemen and helpers 

Road freight conductors 

Road freight brakemen and flagmen 

Road passenger engineers and motormen 

Road passenger firemen and helpers 

Road passenger conductors 

Road passenger brakemen and flagmen 

Other transportation employees 

All other employees 



Total 



1920 



Average 
Number of 
Employees 

For Year 



2 

278^2 



Total 
Compensa- 
tion During 

Year 



266.67 
400.00 
825.00 
974.00 
888.12 
293.91 
857.31 
122.51 
280.74 
400.00 
519.88 
671.42 
631.67 
786.87 
839.28 
623.86 
886.19 
417.75 
977.84 
906.63 
310.23 
125.62 
535.59 
827.94 
194.83 
627.68 
047.99 
641.78 
117.73 
517.23 
562.43 
638.11 
486.35 
399.50 
927.50 



840.00 



$ 379.370.16 



January — June, 1921 



Average 
Number of 
Employees 



210 



Total 
Compensa- 
tion 



1,800.00 
1.200.00 
1.950.00 
2,172.00 

16,305.85 

645.00 

1,484.72 

858.86 

8.534.00 

1.440.00 

2,340.44 

4,834.76 

1,841.94 

1,766,18 

6,655,29 

872.78 

4,570.30 

1.681.30 

3,439.11 

25,498.70 
3,585.00 
2,664.24 
2,196.30 

10,687.76 
1,144,10 
3,194.65 
3,560.97 
6.569,62 
5,100.86 
5,763.13 

11,732.62 
2,271.25 
1,665.46 
2.174.16 
1.449.42 
420.00 



$ 154.071.11 



144 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



EMPLOYEES, SERVICE, AND COMPENSATION— Conhnwed 

SIX MONTHS ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1021 



Reporting Division 



Average 
Number of 
Employees 
in Service 



Compensation 



I. Executives, Officials, and Staff Assistants: 

Executives, general officers, and assistants 

Division officers, assistants, and staff assistants 

Total (executives, officials, and staff assistants) 

II. Professional, Clerical, and General: 

Supervisory or chief clerks (major departments) 

Clerks and clerical specialists (A) 

Clerks (B)__: 

Stenographers and secretaries (A ) 

Stenographers and typists (B) 

Storekeepers, sales agents, and buyers 

Traveling auditors or accountants 

Messengers and office boys 

Elevator operators and other office attendants 

Traffic agents, advertising and development agents 

Motor vehicle and motor car operators 

Total (professional, clerical, and general) ^ .._ , , 

( Hourly basis 

III. Maintenance of Way and Structures: 

Roadmasters and general foremen (M. of W. & S.) 

Bridge and building gang foremen (skilled labor, M, of W. & S.) 

Bridge and building carpenters 

Skilled trades helpers (M. of W. & S.) 

Regular apprentices (M. of W. & S.) 

Gang foremen (extra gang and work-train laborers) 

Gang or section foremen 

Laborers (extra gang and work-train) 

Track and roadway section laborers 

Maintenance of way laborers (other than track and roadway) and gar 
deners and farmers 

Total (maintenance of way and structures) •] TT ", , 

I Hourly basis 



$ 3,000.00 

1,950.00 



4 


% 4,950.00 


1 


% 1,080.00 


1 


840.00 


20 


12,848.56 


I 


750.00 


3 


1,343.91 


1 


900.00 


1 


900.00 


1 


344.07 


1 


462.34 


1 


1,122.00 


1 


390.00 


4 


% 3,446.07 


28 


17,534.81 


1 


% 1,050.00 


2 


1,500.00 


5y2 


3,260.00 


SV2 


1,483.50 


lYi 


998.31 


1 


841.87 


13 


8,632.56 


10 


3,951.94 


63 


18,463.00 


1 


345.56 



101 1-7 



% 1,050.00 

39,857.99 



CAROLINA AND YADKIN EIVER RAILWAY 

Carolina and Yadkin River Railroad Company 

OFFICERS 



145 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




A. W. Krech 

W. E. Price 

X. H. Hole, Jr 

L. E. Ryan 


New York City 


General Manager or Superintendent 

Secretary and Treasurer 

Traffic Manager 


High Point, N. C. 
New York City 
High Point, N. C. 



DIRECTORS 

A. W. Krech, New York City; W. Roberson, High Point, N. C; L. H. Hole, Jr., New York City; 
L. W. Ciark, Ne\*- York City; A. L. Brooks, Greensboro, N. C; T. J. Finch, Thomasville, N. C; 
L. D. Baldwin, New York City; C. B. Hole, Greensboro, N. C; A. D. Hammond, New York City; 
W. E. Price, High Point, N. C; F. S. Lambeth, Thomasville, N. C. 

ROAD OPERATED 





To 


Miles 


From 


N. C. 


Total 


High Point, N. C 


High Rock, N. C. 


34.81 


34.81 







CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on honds not included) _ 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile . 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, N. C. 



1920. 



1,800,000.00 

52,829.59 

1,288,600.00 

37,018.09 

3,183,298.88 

91,470.80 

22,151.37 

636.60 

92,107.00 

149,915.83 

146,114.86 

3,800.97 

4,306.69 

4,197.49 

143,198.47 

41.24 

4,113.71 

.90 

1.626 

6,676.12 

2.5 

849.27 



1921 



Employees: Number general officers, 5; office clerks, 11; station agents, 4; other station men, 
6; enginemen, 2; firemen, 2; conductors, 2; other trainmen, 4; machinists, 1; carpenters, 1; other 
shopmen, 2; section foremen, 6; other trackmen, 37; other employees, 6; total, 89. 

Went into hands of Receiver, 1921. 



146 



N. C. CORPORATION COi\r MISSION 



Carolina Railroad Company 



HISTORY 

Organized December 11, 1912, under laws of North Carolina. General laws of North Carolina as set 
out in Chapter 61 of Pell's Revisal of North Carolina. 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President 


G. R. Loyall 

J C Poe 


Norfolk, Va. 
Kinston N C 


Secretary 

Treasurer 

General Freight and Passenger Agent 


M. S. Hawkins 

J. G. George 

J. F. Dalton 


Norfolk, Va. 
Norfolk, Va. 
Norfolk, Va. 



DIRECTORS 

G. R. Loyall, Norfolk, Va.; C. I. Millard, Norfolk, Va.; L. C. Millard, Norfolk, Va.; C. W. Akers, 
Princeton, W. Va.; G. C. Speight, Norfolk, Va.; S. H. Hinson, Norfolk, Va. 

ROAD OPERATED 



From 


To 


Mi 
N. C. 


les 

Total 


Kinston, N. C. 




Snow Hill, N. C. . -- 


13.0'J5 
2.133 


15.228 









CAKOLINA EAILKOAD COMPANY 



14^ 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included). 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile _" 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid N. C 



1920 



35,000.00 

2,672.78 



92,197.83 

7,040.69 

2,056.00 

157.01 

7,197.70 

38,412.09 

28,140.28 

10,271.81 

2.933.34 

2,148.93 

31.780.57 

5.076.17 

2,426.92 

15.262 

387.76 

1,555.35 

.024 

569.94 



1921 



35,000.00 

2,672.78 

48,000.00 

3,665.52 

92,197.83 

7,040.69 

2,056.00 

157.00 

7,197.70 

40,313.08 

30,737.43 

9,575.65 

2,647.30 

2,018.48 

34,107.18 

5,277.52 

2,239.76 

9,983 

346.57 

928.38 

.03697 

1,170.81 



Employees: Number general officers, 5; office clerks, 2; station agents, 1; other station men, 1; 
enginemen, 1; firemen, 1; conductors, 1; other trainmen, 1; section foremen, 1; other trackmen, 3; 
total, 17. 



148 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



Carolina, Clinchfield and Ohio R ailroad Company 



HISTORY 

1. Exact name of common carrier making this report: Carolina, Clinchfield and Ohio Railway. 

2. Date of organization: Original charter granted to South and Western Railroad Company 
January 26, 1905. On August 7, 1906, it was amended to increase the capital stock to $7,600,000. 
On March 7, 1908, it was amended to increase the capital stock to $27,000,000 ($15,000,000 preferred and 
$12,000,000 common) and to change the corporate name to Carolina, Clinchfield and Ohio Railway. 
On March 29, 1909, it was amended to provide for the construction, maintenance and operation of cer- 
tain portion of our present line in Virginia. On July 26, 1909, it was amended to increase the capital 
stock from $27,000,000 to $30,000,000 ($15,000,000 preferred and $15,000,000 common). On May 2.3, 1912, 
it was amended to provide for the construction, maintenance and operation of a portion of our present 
line in Virginia. On June 3, 1912, it was amended to provide that the capital stock, amounting to $30,- 
000,000, should consist of $10,000,000 preferred and $20,000,000 common, instead of $15,000,000 preferred 
and $15,000,000 common, as provided by the amendment of July 26, 1909. On June 7, 1912, it was amend- 
ed to increase the capital stock from $30,000,000 to $40,000,000 ($15,000,000 preferred and $25,000,000 
common). On March 29, 1916, it was amended to increase the capital stock from $40,000,000 to $50,000,- 
000 ($25,000,000 preferred and $25,000,000 common). 

3. Under the laws of what government, state or territory organized? If more than one, name all; 
give reference to each statute and all amendments thereof. 

State of Virginia. See also question 6 and answer. 

4. If a consolidated company, name all constituent companies. Give specific reference to charter 
or general laws governing organization of each, and all amendments of same. 

See question 6 and answer. 

5. Date and authority for each consolidation and for each merger. 
See question 6 and answer. 

6. If a reorganized company, give name of original corporation, and refer to law under which it 
was organized and state the occasion for the reorganization. 

The original corporation was chartered by the State Corporation Commission of Virginia, on 
January 26, 1905. The charter was amended March 7, 1908, changing the name to Carolina, CHnchfield 
and Ohio Railway, and increasing the capital stock. The present concern is authorized to operate in 
the States of Tennessee and North Carolina, as well as Virginia. By deed, dated March 31, 1908, the 
Carolina, Chnchfield and Ohio Railway acquired the properties, rights and franchises of South and 
Western Railroad, a corporation organized under the laws of the State of Tennessee, by Articles of Con- 
solidation, dated November 20, 1906, between South and Western Railroad Company (of Tennessee) 
and Kingsport Southern Railway, and is now operating these properties, etc., in Tennessee. By 
deed, dated April 16, 1908, the Carolina, Clinchfield and Ohio Railway acquired the properties, rights 
and franchises of the South and Western Railroad Company, a corporation chartered under the laws 
of the State of North Carolina on December 1, 1905, and is now operating these properties, etc., in 
North Carolina. Thus, while the original South and Western Railroad Company (of Virginia) was 
only authorized to operate in Virginia, the Carolina, Clinchfield and Ohio Railway is authorized to, 
and is, operating in Virginia, Tennessee and North Carolina. 

7. State whether or not the respondent during the year conducted any part of its business under a 
name or names other than that shown in response to inquiry No. 1, if so, give full particulars. 

None. 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




N. S. Meldrum 

C. Ledyard Blair 


New York, N. Y. 




New York, N. Y. 




J. McQuilkin 

J. J. Campion 

Edward C. Bailly 

John W. Sanders 

H. G. Morrison 

J. McQuilkin 

L H Phetteplace 






Johnson City, Tenn. 




New York, N. Y. 




Johnson, City, Tenn. 


General Solicitor . 

Comptroller 

General Manager 


Johnson City, Tenn. 
Johnson City, Tenn. 
Erwin, Tenn. 


Engineer in Charge 


W. C Hattan 


Erwin, Tenn. 


Superintendent 


L. L. Mclntyre 


Erwin, Tenn. 







CAROLINA, CLINCHFIELD AND OHIO RAILWAY 



149 



DIRECTORS 

C. Ledyard Blair, New York, N. Y.; John B. Dennis, New York, N. Y.; William W. Miller, New 
York, N. Y.; Walter F. Rosen, New York, N. Y.; N. S. Meldrum, New York, N. Y.; Thomas F. Ryan, 
New York, N. Y.; W. M. Ritter, Washington, D. C; Mortimer M. Buckner, New York, N. Y.; J. W . 
Pless, Marion, N. C; D. B. Wents, Philadelphia, Pa.; Elisha Walker, New York, N. Y. 



COMPARATIVE GENERAL BALANCE SHEET— ASSET SIDE 



Balance at 

Beginning of 

Year 1920 


Item 


Balance at 

Close of Year 

1920 


Balance at 

Close of Year 

1921 


$57,696,169.76 


Investments: 


$64,129,434.06 


$ 64,410,447.63 


668 95 


Improvements on leased railway property 








36,373.98 

3,493,513.30 

3,893,967.58 

746,836.87 

9,000.00 


17,955.08 


3,493,513.30 

3,905,037.86 

319,144.42 


Investments in affiliated companies: 

Stocks 

Bonds 

Advances 

Other investments: 
Notes 


3,505,513.30 

3,869,300.10 

782.546.71 

9,000.00 




Total investments 




$65,414 534.29 


$72,309,125.79 


$ 72,594,762.82 




Current Assets: 
Cash 




$ 699,711.59 
466,317.48 


$ 972,109.28 
332,225.00 


$ 2,326,158.06 
324,205.00 






25,107.08 


988.39 
4,397.18 
48,125.04 


Traffic and car-service balances receivable 

Net balance receivable from agents and conductors 
Miscellaneous accounts receivable 


139,092.22 

16,732.03 

285,164.07 

936,599.89 

1,562,030.11 


242,533.30 

7,707.76 
210,867.72 


1,387,129.79 


Material and supplies 

Interest and dividends receivable 


964,562.35 
1,756,312.04 


100.00 


Rents receivable 






Other current assets 




247,786.48 




Total current assets 






$ 2,606,769.47 


$ 4,243,952.60 


$ 6,105,239.79 




Deferred Assets: 
Working fund advances 

Other deferred assets . _ . . _ . _ _ _ . . 




$ 1,459,646.78 


$ 2,776.96 
2,349,388.16 


$ 2,581.29 




Total deferred assets 




$ 1,459,646.78 


$ 2,352,165.12 


$ 2,581.29 




Unadjusted Debits: 
Rents and insurance premiums paid in advance.. 






$ 17,114.75 

4,488.75 

1,026,994.91 


$ 10,605.55 


$ 794,514.51 




605,154.20 




Total unadjusted debits. ... 




$ 794,514.51 


$ 1,048,598.41 


$ 615,759.75 




Grand total 




$70,275,465.05 


$79,953,841.92 


$ 79,318,343.65 









150 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



COMPARATIVE GENERAL BALANCE SHEET-LIABILITY SIDE 



Balance at 

Beginning of 

Year 1920 


Item 


Balance at 

Close of Year 

1920 


Balance at 

Close of Year 

1921 


$36,500,000.00 


Stock: 
Capital stock . . . 


$36,500,000.00 


I 36,500,000.00 




Totalstock 




$36,500,000.00 


$36,500,000.00 


$ 36,500,000.00 




Long-term Debt: 




$23,875,000.00 


$33,023,000.00 


$ 28,095,000.00 




Open accounts 


390 828 77 




Totallong-term debt--- - _- ----- 






$23,875,000.00 


$33,023,000.00 


$ 28,485,828.77 




Current Liabilities: 
Loans and bills payable 

Traffic and car-service balances payable 




$ 4,099,000.00 


$ 1,000,000.00 

282,658.41 

812,851.60 

82,537.77 

340,981.76 


$ 6,000,000.00 
199,545.00 
520,337.87 


2,836.38 




8,429.46 






592,270.35 






5,000.00 


364,466.80 




259,186.64 


226,348.00 


15,213.88 




102,011.36 










$ 4,481,517.06 


$ 2,778,216.18 


$ 7,653,942.34 




Deferred Liabilities: 




$ 1,792,078.80 


$ 2,130.739.07 


$ 1,577.83 








$ 1,792,078.80 


$ 2,130,739.07 


$ 1,577.83 




Unadjusted Credits: 
Tax liability --_ 




$ 17,514.48 


$ 151,787.10 


$ 84,437.23 


593,246.72 










1,405,764.96 


1,815,601.06 


20,464.36 


Accrued depreciation— miscellaneous physical 








346,360.98 


60,612.85 




Total unadjusted credits 




$ 631,225.56 


$ 1,903,913.04 


$ 1,960,651.14 




Corporate Surplus: 
Additions to property throughi ncome and surplus 




$ 19,645.30 


t 19,645.30 


$ 37,464.94 


$ 19,645.30 


$ 19.645.30 
3,598,328.33 


$ 37,464.94 


2,975,998.33 




4,678,878.63 








% 2,995,643.63 


$ 3,617,973.63 


$ 4,716,343.57 




Grand total - -. 




$70,275,465.05 


$79,9.53,841.92 


$ 79,318,343.65 









CAROLINA, CLINCHFIELD AND OHIO RAILWAY 



151 



ROAD OPERATED AT CLOSE OF YEAR 







1920-1921 




Name of Road or Track 


Miles 

of 
Road 


Miles of 

Yard Track 

and Sidings, 

etc. 


Total 




255.97 
15.78 


120.87 


376.84 


Branches and spurs 


15.78 








Total . - - -- -- -- - 


271.75 


120.87 


392.62 






Under Lease: 


2.79 


5.12 

.58 


7.91 




.58 








Under Trackage Rights: 
Norfolk and Western Ry. 


8.45 




8.45 






Total 


282.99 


126.57 


409.56 







MILES OF ROAD AT CLOSE OF YEAR — BY STATES AND TERRITORIES — SINGLE TRACK 





Road Operated-1920-1921 


State 


Line Owned 


Line Operated 
Under Lease 


Line Operated 

Under Trackage 

Rights 


Total 




Main Line 


Branches and 
Spurs 


Mileage 
Operated 


Kentucky 






2.79 




2 79 


Virginia 


83.77 
55.59 
116.61 


12.67 

2.32 

.79 


8.45 


104 89 


Tennessee 




57 91 


North Carolina. - 






117.40 










Total mileage.- 
(single track) 


255.97 


15.78 


2.79 


8.45 


2S2.99 



152 



N. C. COBPORATION COMMISSION 



RAILWAY OPERATING REVENUES-ENTIRE LINE 



Class of Railway Operating 
Revenues 



1920 



Total 

Amount of 

Revenue for 

the Year 



Comparison 

With Total 

Revenue of 

Preceding 

Year 



1921 



Total 

Amount of 

Revenue for 

the Year 



Comparison 

With Total 

Revenue of 

Preceding 

Year 



Freight 

Passenger 

Excess baggage 

Mail 

Express 

Other passenger-train 

Milk 

Switching 

Special service-train 

Total rail-line transportation 
revenue 

Station, train, and boat privileges. _ 

Parcel room 

Storage— freight 

Storage— baggage 

Demurrage 

Telegraph and telephone 

Rents of buildings and other property 
Miscellaneous 

Total incidental operating revenue 

Total railway operating revenues . 



$ 6,537,390.50 

520,810.52 

1,960.99 

63,273.62 

28,429.71 

672.87 

630.98 

15,832.55 

966.40 



$ 1,089,202.73 

108,127.44 

298.23 

47,748.81 

2,489.05 

309.50 

109.89 

7,602.55 

703.86 



6,476,043.79 

503,498.67 

2,235.10 

33,269.73 

45,274.44 

1,265.78 

398.47 

13,473.69 

716.37 



$ 7,169,968.14 



$ 1,256,592.06 



$ 7,076,176.04 



5,521.88 

150.45 

3,352.95 

185.15 

14,593.00 

10,103.42 

"16,112.28 

21,338.98 



3,112.90 

46.95 

25.91 

46.69 

*9,912.00 

1,594.71 

*24,905.16 

12,365.01 



7,870.75 
123.. 50 
4,373.10 
170.43 
16,108.07 
9,119.68 
1,481.43 
6,079.54 



39,133.55 



47,624.99 



$ 45,326.50 



$ 7,209,101.1 



$ 1,238,967.07 



$ 7,121,502.54 



"61,346.71 

"17,311.85 

274.11 

"30,003.89 

16,844.73 

592.91 

*232.51 

*2.358.86 

*250.03 



.792.10 



2,348.87 

*26.95 

1,020.15 

♦14.72 

1,515.07 

*983.74 

17,593.71 

"15,259.44 

6,192.95 



57,599.15 



"Decrease. 



CAROLINA, CLINCHFIELD AND OHIO 
RAILWAY OPERATING REVENUES— WITHIN 



RAILWAY 153 

THE STATE 



Class of Railway Operating Revenues 



Freight 

Passenger 

Excess baggage. 
Mail 



Express 

Other passenger-train . 
Milk 



Switching 

Special service train . 



Total rail-line transportation revenue- 



Station, train, and boat privileges 

Parcel room 

Storage — freight 

Storage— baggage 

Demurrage 

Telegraph and telephone 

Rents of buildings and other property. 
Miscellaneous 



Total incidental operating revenue. 
Total railway operating revenues . . 



On Interstate and Intra- 
state Traffic 



1920 



$ 2,323,211.84 

156,087.01 

547.72 

28,473.12 

12,793.36 

328.64 

.37 

7,124.65 



$ 2,528,566.71 



2,484.85 

3.20 

1,508.83 

1.90 

6,567.00 

4.546.54 

*7,250.53 

9,602.54 



17,464.33 



$ 2,546,031.04 



1921 



$ 2,914,219.71 

226,574.40 

1,005.80 

14,971.38 

20,373.50 

569.60 

179.31 

6,063.16 

322.37 



$ 3,184,279.23 



3,541.84 
55.57 

1,967.90 
76.69 

7,248.63 

4.103.86 
666.65 

2,735.79 



20,396.93 



% 3,204,676. 



RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES 



Name of Railway Operating 
Expense Account 



, Maintenance of Way and Structures: 

Superintendence 

Roadway maintenance — yard 

Roadway maintenance — other 

Tunnels and subways — yard 

Tunnels and subways— other 

Bridges, trestles, and culverts — yard 

Bridges, trestles, and culverts — other 

Ties — yard 

Ties — other 

Rails — yard 

Rails — other 

Other track material — yard 

Other track material — other 

Ballast — yard 

Ballast — other 

Track laying and surfacing — yard 

Track laying and surfacing — other 

Right-of-way fences — yard 

Ri ght-of-way fences — other 

Crossings and signs — yard 

Crossings and signs — other 



►Credit 
—21 



Amount of Operating Expense for the Year 



Entire Line 



1920 



36,152.14 

934.31 

144,759.76 



5,797.79 

13.49 

57,333.82 

716.30 

171,793.73 

*182.88 

70,050.31 



51,848.12 



22,304.29 
20,130.14 
309,242.73 



938.70 
3,258.46 



1921 



$ 30,503.77 

1,845.55 

80,737.15 



1,482.52 



42,503.79 
30,860.77 
240,943.62 

2,125.80 
74,843.14 

4,396.31 
49,607.09 



8,213.48 

22,364.88 

257,573.19 



641.79 
124.08 



Within the State 



1920 



$ 14,695.97 
70,327.64 



2.810.97 
32,076.94 



67,003.04 
54,377.99 



22,744.44 

8,837.93 



121,595.98 

88.23 

1,577.85 



1921 



$ 13,449.62 

448.34 

34,461.56 



428.98 



12,804.08 

5,578.03 

103,274.16 

582.57 

45,823.63 

603.51 

22,068.38 



4,059.55 

3,438.89 

100,982.74: 



47.76i 
1,825.37 



154 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES— Coiitinued 



Name of Railway Operating 
Expense Account 



Maintenance of Way and Structures 
— Continued 

Station and office buildings 

Roadway buildings 

Water stations 

Fuel stations 

Shops and enginehouses 

Telegraph and telephone lines 

Signals and interlockers 

Miscellaneous structures 

Roadway machines 

Small tools and supplies 

Removing snow, ice, and sand 

Assessments for public improvements 

Injuries to persons 

I nsurance 

Stationery and printing 

Other expenses 



Total. 



Maintaining joint tracks, yards, and other 
facilities — Dr 

Maintaining joint tracks, yards, and other 
facilities — Cr. 



Total maintenance of way and structures 

II. Maintenance of Equipment: 

Superintendence 

Shop machinery 

Steam locomotives — repairs 

Steam locomotives — depreciation 

Freight-train cars — repairs 

Freight-train cars — depreciation 

Freight-train cars — retirements 

Passenger-train cars — repairs 

Passenger-train cars — depreciation 

Passenger-train cars — retirements 

Motor equipment of cars — repairs 

Work equipment — repairs 

Work equipment — depreci ati on 

Injuries to persons 

Insurance 

Stationery and printing 

Other expenses 

Total 

Total maintenance of equipment 

III. Traffic: 

Superintendence 

Outside agencies 

Advertising 

Traffic associations 

♦Credit 



Amount of Operating Expenses for the Y 



Entire Line 



1920 



12,626.99 

2,761.81 

13,517.64 

16,449.91 

12,531.44 

16,754.95 

894.45 

112.94 

5,689.17 

11,816.49 

528.68 

423.15 

4,746.98 

1,747.95 

1,824.13 



$ 977,517. 



% 3,887.23 
631.06 



$1,000,774.06 




$1,912,391.23 



$1,912,391.23 



$ 50,462.27 

115,235.20 

3,953.10 

2,293.58 



7,047.43 
410.03 

7,378.20 
12,159.51 
13,249.87 

9,201.38 

1,092.83 



4,438.70 

9,056.14 

658.81 



1,884.26 

2,636.61 

543.68 

25.00 



$ 922,249.07 



$ 5,182.23 
2,608.07 



$ 924,823.23 



44,627.36 

27,501.99 

450,032.64 

104,289.48 

712,561.88 

306,096.98 

6,966.50 

45,995.41 

5,927.88 

552.77 



16,894.55 
4,824.54 
3,603.28 
5,195.22 
2,144.69 
50.62 



$1,737,265.79 



$1,737,265.79 



66,273.14 

141,011.93 

1,300.65 

2.483.01 



Within the State 
1920 1921 



5,098.49 

966.21 

6,249.60 

7,170.78 

3,464.97 

6,910.86 

513.18 

.04 

2,734.41 

4,451.65 

229.48 



3,717.84 
311.48 
574.48 



$ 438,530.45 



$ 924.73 

284.28 



$ 439,170. 



18,769.79 

16,871.50 

261,565.52 

47,172.43 

313,830.51 

154,003.02 

2,604.03 

20,138.84 

2,652.44 

161.92 

6.29 

13,593.73 

2,786.93 

*211.16 

1,783.56 

1,545.15 

144.82 



$ 857,095.48 



857,095.48 



22,708.02 

51,855.84 

1,778.90 

759.11 



1.793.05 
51.67 
2,790.05 
6.029.20 
3,793.30 
3,907.10 
618.41 



2,006.73 

3,280.81 

270.05 



1,428.06 

624.54 

244.65 

11.25 



% 373,869.92 



$ 3,031.15 
1,954.98 



$ 374, 



19,189.76 

11,825.85 

193,193.91 

44,844.48 

306,401.61 

131,621.70 

2,995.59 

19,778.03 

2,548.99 

237.69 



7,253.99 
2,074.55 

57.46 

2,233.95 

922.22 

21.76 



$ 745,201.54 



745,201.54 



$ 28,497.45 

60,635.12 

559.27 

1,067.69 



CAROLINA, CLINCHP^IELD AND OHIO RAILWAY 



155 



RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES- Continued 





Amount of Operating 


Expenses for the Y^ear 


Name of Railway Operating 
Expense Account 


Entire Line 


Within The State 




1920 


1921 


1920 


1921 


III. Traffic— Continued 

Industrial and immigration bureaus 

Insurance 


$ 8,132.85 


$ 5,843.79 

16.92 

21,210.98 


$ 3,659.78 


$ 2,512.83 
7.28 




19,199.39 


8,639.72 


9,120.72 






Total 


$ 199.276.39 


$ 238,140.42 


$ 89,401.37 


$ 102,400.36 






IV. Traxsportation— Rail Line: 


$ 89,431.56 

47,648.03 

165,422.10 

3,244.14 


$ 88,301.27 

38,216.16 

153,264.86 

1,098.58 


$ 39,832.47 

17,088.98 

43,600.50 

1,459.87 


1 37,945.11 




12,028.02 


Station employees 

Weighing, inspection, anddemurrage bureaus 
Coal and ore wharves 


38,061.80 

472.38 

3,372.08 


Station supplies and expenses 


8,676.02 
24,069.28 
85,551.42 

1,887.47 
47,391.56 


9,594.69 
18,878.84 
57,232.47 

1,481.19 
34,644.27 


3,399.68 


3,090.25 


Yardmasters and yard clerks 


40.06 


Y'ard conductors and brakemen 






Yard switch and signal tenders 




24.25 


Y'ard enginemen 


4.632.60 




Y"ard motormen 


32.10 


Fuel for yard locomotives 


53,042.90 

2,731.51 

1,980.84 

1,804.34 

19,662.14 

373.16 

■ 381,617.78 

1,407.20 

589,397.36 

27,366.77 

23,987.40 

15,930.88 

142,475.27 

380,705.34 

68,110.82 

1,038.23 

2,797.20 

539.57 

27,876.41 

808.76 

211.93 

78,629.03 

10,235.49 

20,608.21 

54,363.14 

141.54 

20,025.98 


45,860.10 

2,805.50 

1,030.11 

1,248.26 

15,587.86 

237.59 

291,638.18 

1,661.56 

533,063.31 

22,798.07 

17,873.09 

12,723.33 

119,857.00 

261,880.51 

56,120.72 

484.86 

4,103.16 

579.48 

19,109.00 

3,577.42 

425.43 

34,068.41 

9,061.00 

15,270.50 

49,263.50 

256.74 

18,927.12 










1.96 






.72 


Other supplies for yard locomotives 

Enginehouse expenses— yard 

Y'ard supplies and expenses 

Train enginemen - 


126.58 

346.46 

23.72 

164,977.17 

605.70 

264,173.89 

10,784.34 

10,620.28 

7,168.88 

63,287.21 

161,350.43 

30,652.93 

460.60 

222.23 

242.80 

12,381.43 

285.74 

112.40 

36,354.87 

3,462.37 

1,642.29 

17,271.47 

6.98 

7,743.17 


.87 

10.91 

.17 

119,765.25 


Train motormen 


87.09 


Fuel for train locomotives 


223,908.38 


Water for train locomotives 


7,801.56 


Lubricants for train locomotives 


7,614.58 


Other suppHes for train locomotives 

Enginehouse expenses — train 


5,417.30 
51,382.16 


Trainmen 


103,757.47 


Train supplies and expenses 

Signal and interlocker operation 

Crossing protection 


23,086.39 
234.18 


Telegraph and telephone operation 

Stationery and printing _ 


249.18 
8,113.92 


Other expenses - ._. _ 


1,479.89 




182.94 




17,828.10 


Damage to property 


6,476.83 


Damage to live stock on right of way 

Loss and damage— freight . 


691.65 
15,266.50 


Loss and damage— baggage 

Injuries to persons _ 


70.24 
2,094.46 






Total 


$2,401,190.78 


$1,942,224.14 


$ 899,685.44 


$ 690,478.89 






Operating joint yards and terminals— Dr. 
Operating joint yards and terminals— Cr.. 
Operating joint tracks and faciHties— Dr. . 
Operating joint tracks and facilities— Cr. . 


$ 26,211.85 

6,492.14 

207.72 

252.32 


$ 23,569.32 
3,417.86 
6,839.83 
1,664.70 


$ 4,395.74 

5,304.37 

91.53 

32.55 


$ 7,097.89 

3,165.18 

2,993.77 

816.41 


Total transportation— rail line 


$2,420,865.89 


$1,967,550.73 


$ 898,835.79 


$ 696,588.96 



156 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 
RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES— Cojihnwed 





Amount of Operating Expenses for the Year 


Name of Railway Operating 
Expense Account 


Entire Line 


Within the State 




1920 


1921 


1920 


1921 


V. General: 

Salaries and expenses of general officers . . 
Salaries and expenses of clerks and 

attendants 

General office supplies and expenses 


$ 50,663.46 

113,421.39 
20,087.91 
27,264.50 
331.98 
17,488.44 
3,294.59 
11,623.94 


$ 36,080.07 

92,094.57 

21,218.35 

59,489.77 

352.08 

14,235.41 

6,043.95 

5,686.78 


$ 22,798.56 

51,039.62 
9,039.55 

12,131.09 

149.39 

7,869.80 

1,482.56 

5,230.77 


$ 15.514.44 

39.600.67 

9.123.89 

25,580.60 




151.39 




6,121.23 


Valuation expenses 


2,598.90 




2,445.31 






Total _ 


$ 244,176.21 


$ 235,200.98 


$ 109,741.34 


$ 101.136.43 






Total general expenses 


$•244,176.21 


$ 235,200.98 


$ 109,741.34 


$ 101.136.43 


Transportation for Investment— Or. . 


$ 2,499.39 


$ 4,565.50 


$ 1,124.73 


$ 2,054.48 


Grand total railway operating expense.* 


$5,774,984.39 


$5,098,415.65 


$2,393,120.15 


$2,020,273.38 



Operating ratio (ratio of operating expenses to operating revenues, entire line), 80. 11 per cent for 
1920; for 1921, 71.59 per cent. 

Operating ratio (ratio of operating expenses to operating revenues, within the state), 93.99 for 1920, 
for 1921, 63.04 per cent. 

EMPLOYEES AND THEIR COMPENSATION 



1920 



1921 



Number of employees 
Compensation 



1,732 
$3,054,596.84 



1,622 
$1,435,317.82 



CAROLINA, CLINCHFIELD AND OHIO RAILWAY 



157 



REVENUE FREIGHT CARRIED-ENTIRE LINE 





1920 


1921 


Commodity 


Number of 
Carloads 


Number of 

Tons 
(2,000 lbs.) 


Number of 
Carloads 


Number of 

Tons 
(2,000 lbs.) 


Products of Agriculture: 
Wheat 


638 

358 

247 

5 

997 

329 

1,678 

29 

73 

93 

51 

166 

84 

44 

2 

153 


20,543 

11,396 

6,578 

88 

27,908 

8,090 

24,078 

298 

892 

1,552 

692 

2,502 

2,299 

415 

12 

2,917 


531 

276 

224 

20 

1,085 

652 

3,063 

131 

281 

109 

88 

368 

115 

51 

22 

88 


19,246 


Corn - - -- 


8,160 


Oats - 


5,331 




429 




20,443 


Other mill products 


12,293 


Hay, straw, and alfalfa 


40,442 


Tobacco 


1,244 


Cotton 


3,365 


Cotton seed and products, except oil 

Citrus fruits 


1,976 
1,275 




5,496 


Potatoes 


1,971 
700 




418 




1,343 






Total 


4,947 


110,255 


7,104 


124,132 






Products of Animals: 
Horses and mules 


29 
99 
12 
5 
31 
53 
27 


321 
1,064 
132 
45 
295 
538 
444 


31 

72 

3 

8 

117 

59 

1 

20 

3 

140 

29 


363 


Cattle and calves 


764 


Sheep and goats 


33 


Hogs 

Fresh meats 


73 
2,051 


Other packing-house products 


1,004 


Poultry 


63 


Eggs 


11 


Butter and cheese 






195 


Wool 






34 




156 

78 


3,541 

1,867 


2,974 




646 






Total 


490 


8,247 


490 


8,211 






Products of Mines: 




4,261,427 

30,597 

6,602 

237,216 


67,966 

57 

6 

7,334 

4 

22 

676 

2,156 


3,324,383 






1,181 


Coke 




242 


Clay, gravel, sand and stone 


4,896 


373,221 


Crude petroleum-. . . 


113 


Asphaltum _ 


35 

346 

2,316 


1,065 
10,222 
85,459 


601 


Salt - - 


14,698 


Other products of mines 


82,423 






Total 


91,534 


4,632,588 


78,221 


3 797,562 






Products of Forests: 
Logs, posts, poles, and cordwood 


5,519 

882 

4,984 

10,019 
1,928 


136,771 
21,367 
97,669 

228,969 
42,012 


2,683 
407 

2,279 

8,646 
460 


62,120 


Ties 


11,462 


Pulp wood 


50 926 


Lumber, timber, box shooks, staves, and 
headings 


217 082 


Other products of forests 


8 414 






Total 


23,332 


526,788 


14,475 


350 004 







158 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 
REVENUE FREIGHT CARRIED-ENTIRE L\NE— Continued 





1920 


1921 


Commodity 


Number of 
Carloads 


Number of 

Tons 
(2,000 lbs.) 


Number of 
Carloads 


Number of 

Tons 
(2,000 lbs.) 


Manufactures and Miscellaneous: 

Refined petroleum and its products 

Sugar, sirup, glucose, and molasses 


220 
193 
186 
288 

475 

48 

519 

2,621 

2.548 

587 

115 

339 

2,212 

337 

106 

103 

81 

435 

10 

1,051 

42 

118 

4,739 


6,071 
5,090 
8,238 
13,360 

11,913 
1,221 
8,546 
90,508 
92,071 
16,452 
2,549 

5.263 

12,790 

3,054 

834 

2,147 

1,107 

11,961 

180 

30,591 

340 

2,715 

111,833 


323 
76 

7 
195 

451 

9 

285 

4,870 

3,220 

384 

98 

248 

2,805 

180 

180 

47 

122 

393 

41 

396 

112 

127 

3,441 


8.291 

1.738 

215 




8 968 


Bar and sheet iron, structural iron, and 


10,418 


Other metals, pig, bar, and sheet 


159 
4,202 


Cement 


166 759 


Brick and artificial stone 


107 717 


Lime and plaster 


9 579 


Sewer pipe and drain tile 


1 800 


Agricultural implements and vehicles 
other than automobiles 


3 370 




17.639 


Household goods andsecondhand furniture 

Furniture (new) 

Beverages 

Ice 

Fertilizers (all kinds) 


1.-387 
1,525 
760 
1.706 
9.334 


Paper, printed matter, and books 


802 
11,242 


Textiles 

Canned goods (all canned food products) . - 
Other manufactures and miscellaneous. .. 


1.733 
2,446 

68.595 


Total 


17,373 


438,834 


18,010 


440.385 




137,676 


5.716,712 
153,812 


118,300 


4,720.294 


Merchandise — all L C. L. freight 


151,857 










Grand total, carload and L.C.L traffic 


137,676 


5,870,524 


118,300 


4,871,151 



CAROLINA^ CLINCHFIELD AND OHIO RAILWAY 
STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— ENTIRE LINE 



159 



Item 


Amount 1920 


Amount 1921 


Average mileage of road operated miles 

Train-miles: 


282.99 


282.99 


796,052 
5,766 


622,480 


Freight— light . - -.. - - - 


3,293 






Freight— total .. --. . - - 


801,818 

324,869 

16,231 

354 


625,773 




321,161 


Mixed 


16,790 


Special - - - - 


2,297 








1,143,272 


966,021 








58,351 


35,527 






Locomotive-miles: 


801,239 
76,535 
80,972 


623,115 




124,114 


Freight— light - ...___ 


120,342 






Freight— total . - - - 


958,746 


867,571 






Passenger — principal 


304,454 
102 
222 


303,164 


Passenger — helper 




Passenger — light 








Passenger — total ^ 


304,778 


303 164 








16,231 


16,790 








16,231 


16,790 








354 


2,297 






Speci al— total 


354 


2,297 


Train switching 


22,081 


132,702 






Yard switching— freight 


275,324 


162,370 


Yard switching— total 


275,324 


162,370 




1,577,514 


1,484,894 








58,351 


35,527 






Car-miles: 
Freight train — loaded 


21,608,527 
15,039,019 


19 200 922 


Freight train — empty 


1'' 846 123 






Sum of loaded and empty - . 


36,647,546 
800,611 


32,047,045 


Freight train— caboose _ 


625,821 






Freight train — total 


37,448,157 


32 672 866 






Passenger train— passenger 

Passenger train— sleeping, parlor, and observation . . ....__ 


622,961 


705,664 
368 


Passenger train— other. ... . ... 


547,558 
1,170,519 


422,259 


Passenger train— total . . 


1.128,291 







160 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— ENTIRE LINE— Continued 



Item 


Amount 1920 


Amount 1921 


Car-miles— Continued 
Mixed train— freight— loaded 


57,919 
19,544 


40,081 
17,960 




4,192 


Mixed train — passenger 


15,966 
11,669 


17,007 
11,680 


Mixed train— other passenger train .__ ... . . 






Mixed train — total 


105,098 


90 920 






Special train — passenger 


920 


7 416 




945 


Special train — other passenger-train 


354 


1 230 






Special train — total 


1,274 


9 591 






Total transportation service 


38,725,048 


33,901,668 






Work service 


205,976 


189,176 






Preight Service: 
Tons — revenue freight 


5,870,524 
224,587 


4,871,151 


Tons — nonrevenue freight 


197,394 






Tons— total ... . -- 


6,095,111 


5,068,545 






Ton-miles — revenue freight 


861,893,265 
25,573,378 


784,845,496 




22,036,658 






Ton-miles — total 


887,466,643 


806,882,154 






Passenger Service: 
Passengers carried — revenue 


713,152 
16,593,779 


634,353 


Passenger-miles — revenue 


14,229,974 






Revenues and Expenses: 
Freight revenue 


S 6,537,390.50 
520,810.52 
615,778.69 


$ 6,476,043.79 


Passenger revenue 


503,498.67 




585,942.19 








$ 7,209,101.69 
5,774,984.39 


$ 7,121,502.54 




5,098,415.65 








$ 1,434,117.30 


$ 2,023,086.89 






Averages per Mile of Road: 
Freight-train miles 


2,833 

1,149 

57 

1 

4,040 

206 

5,574 

132,604 

4,238 

$ 23,101.14 

2,175.94 


2,211 


Passenger-train miles 


1,135 


Mixed-train miles 


59 


Special-train miles 


8 


Transportation service train-miles 


3,414 


Work-train miles 


126 


Locomotive-miles — transportation 


5,247 


Freight service car-miles 


115,676 


Passenger service car-miles 


4,122 


Freight revenue 


$ 22,884.36 


Passenger service train revenue 


2,070.54 



CAROLINA, CLINCHFIELD AND OHIO RAILWAY 161 

STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— ENTIRE UNE— Continued 



Item 



Averages per Mile of Road— Continued 

Operating revenues 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenues 

Ton- miles — revenue freight 

Ton-miles — all freight 

Passenger-miles — revenue 



Averages per Train-mile: 

Loaded freight car-miles — freight trains 

Loaded freight car-miles — mixed trains 

Empty freight car-miles — freight trains 

Empty freight car-miles — mixed trains 

Ton-miles— revenue freight * 

Ton-miles— all freight 

Passenger train car-miles- passenger trains 

Passenger train car-miles — mixed trains 

Revenue passenger-miles 

Freight revenue 

Passenger service train revenue 

Operating revenues 

Operating expenses , 

Net operating revenues 



Averages per Locomotive-mile: 

Train-miles — freight trains 

Car-miles — freight trains 

Train-miles — passenger trains 

Car-miles- passenger trains 

Train-miles — mixed trains 

Car-miles — mixed trains 

Train-miles — special trains 

Car-miles — special trains 



Averages per Loaded Freight Car-mile: 

Ton-miles — revenue freight 

Ton-miles— all freight 

Freight revenue 



Averages per Car-mile — Passenger: 
Passenger-miles— revenue 



Passenger revenue- 



MlSCELLANEOUS AVERAGES 

Miles hauled — revenue freight 

Miles hauled — nonrevenue freight, 

Miles hauled — all freight 

Miles carried — revenue passengers . 

Revenue per ton of freight 

Revenue per ton-mile of freight __. 

Revenue per passenger 

Revenue per passenger-mile 

Operating ratio 



Amount 1920 


Amount 1921 


25,474.76 


% 25,165.21 


20,407.03 


18,016.24 


5,067.73 


7,148.97 


3,045,667 


2,773,404 


3,136,035 


2,851,274 


58,637 


50,284 


26.95 


30.68 


3.57 


2.39 


18.76 


20.53 


1.20 


1.07 


1,053.60 


1,231.58 


1,084.86 


1,266.16 


3.60 


3.51 


1.70 


1.71 


48.65 


43.59 


7.99 


$ 10.16 


1.81 


17.95 


6.31 


7.37 


5.05 


5.28 


1.26 


2.09 


.84 


.72 


39.06 


37.66 


1.07 


1.06 


3.84 


3.72 


1.00 


1.00 


6.48 


5.42 


1.00 


1.00 


3.60 


4.18 


39.78 


40.79 


40.96 


41.94 


f .30173 


$ .33658 


25.97 


19.68 


f .81513 


$ .69636 


146.82 


161.12 


113.87 


111.64 


145.60 


159.19 


23.27 


22.43 


i 1.11360 


S 1.32947 


.00758 


.00825 


. 73026 


.79372 


.03139 


.03538 


'/o 80.11 


% 71.59 



162 N. C. COKPORATION COMMISSION 

STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— WITH IN THE STATE 



Item 


Amount 1920 


Amount 1921 


Average mileage of road operated miles 

Train-miles: 
Freight — ordinary 


117.40 


117.40 


369,385 
2,211 


274,100 


Freight — light 


1,221 






Freight— total 


371,596 
102,670 

172 


275.321 
84,688 


Special 


1,062 








474,438 


361,071 








23,158 


16.742 






Locomotive-miles : 


371,976 
19,628 
21,710 


274,172 




50,158 


Freight— light _ .. . 


48.500 






Freight— total - . 


413,314 


372.830 






Passenger— principal 


93,210 


84.688 


Passenger— total 


93,210 


84.688 


Special — principal 


172 


1,062 


Special— total 


172 


1.062 






Train switching 


5,046 


31,768 






Yard switching — freight 




102 








Yard switching — total 




102 








Total transportation service 


511,742 


490,450 






Work service 


23,158 


16.742 






Car-miles: 
Freight train— loaded 


9,814,199 
7,232,513 


8,540,762 


Freight train — empty 


6,042,608 






Sum of loaded and empty 


17,046,712 
371,603 


14,583,370 


Freight train — caboose 


275,321 






Freight train — total 


17,418,315 


14.858,691 






Passenger train — passenger 


193,473 


208,187 


Passenger train — sleeping, parlor, and observation 


115 


Passenger train — other 


156,687 


105,772 






Passenger train — total 


350,160 


314,074 







CAKOLINA, CLINCHFIELD AND OHIO RAILWAY 163 

STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— WITHIN THE ST fiiJE.— Continued 



I 



Item 


Amount 1920 


Amount 1921 


Car-miles — Continued 
Special train — passenger 


546 


3,951 


Special train — sleeping, parlor, and observation 


345 


Special train — other passenger-train 


172 


647 






Special trai n— total 


718 


4,943 




7,769,193 


1.5.177,708 






Work service 


85,790 


109,908 


Freight Service: 


4,005,974 
101,064 


2,192,018 




88,827 






Tons— total . 


4,107,038 


2.280,845 






Ton-miles— revenue freight 

Ton-miles — nonrevenue freight 


406,043,836 
11.508,020 


3.53,180,473 
9,916,496 






Ton-miles — total 


417,551,856 


363,096,969 






Passenger Service: 
Passengers carried — revenue 


176,046 
5,048,720 


285,459 


Passenger-miles — revenue 


6 403 488 






Revenues and Expenses: 
Freight revenue 


$ 2,323,211.84 
156,087.01 
198.230.22 


$ 2 914 219 71 


Passenger revenue.- _ . _ 


226.574.40 




263.673.99 






Operating revenues . .... ... 


$ 2,546,031.04 
2,393,120.15 


% 3,204,676.16 


Operating expenses... 


2.020,273.38 






Net operating revenues . . 


$ 152,910.89 


$ 1,184,402.78 






Averages per Mile of Road: 
Freight-train miles 




2,345 


Passenger-train miles 




721 


Special-train miles . _ 




9 


Transportation service train-miles 




3 075 


Work-train miles . 




143 


Locomotive-miles— transportation ...... ........ 




4,178 


Freight service car-miles . 


148,367 

2,989 

$ 19,788.86 

1,688.50 

21,686.81 

■ 20,584.33 

1,302.48 

3,458,637 

3,556,660 

43,004 

26.41 

19.46 

1,092.70 


126,565 


Passenger service car-miles •_ ... . 


2,717 


Freight revenue _ 


$ 24,823.00 


Passenger service train revenue _. .... 


2,245.95 


Operating revenues . . 


27,297.07 


Operating expenses . ... 


17,208.46 


Net operating revenues . . 


10,088.61 


Ton-miles— revenue freight . 


3,008,352 


Ton-mil'es- all freight . . 


3,092,819 


Passenger-miles— revenue... . 


5,454 


Averages per Train-mile: 

Loaded freight car-miles— freight trains . 


31.02 


Empty freight car-miles— freight trains 


21.95 


Ton-miles— revenue freight 


1,282.80 



164 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— WITHIN THE ST \TE- Continued 



Item 



Averages per Train-mile— Continued 

Ton-miles — all freight 

Passenger train car-miles — passenger trains 

Revenue passenger-miles 

Freight revenue 

Passenger service train revenue 

Operati ng revenues. - - 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenues 

Averages per Locomotive-mile: 

Train-miles — freight trains 

Car-miles — freight trains 

Train-miles— passenger trains 

Car-miles— passenger trains 

Train-miles— special trains 

Car-miles— special trains 

Averages per Loaded Freight Car-mile: 

Ton-miles — revenue freight 

Ton-miles — all freight 

Freight revenue 

Averages per Car-mile — Passenger: 

Passenger- miles— revenue 

Passenger revenue 

Miscellaneous Averages: 

Miles hauled— revenue freight 

Miles hauled — nonrevenue freight 

Miles hauled — all freight 

Miles carried — revenue passengers 

Revenue per ton of freight 

Revenue per ton-mile of freight 

Revenue per passenger 

Revenue per passenger-mile 

Operating rati o 



Amount 1920 


A 


nount 1921 


1,123.67 




1,318.81 


3.41 




3.71 


49.17 




75.61 


1 6.25 


$ 


10.58 


1.93 




3.11 


5.37 




8.88 


5.04 




5.60 


.32 




3.28 


.90 




.74 


42.14 




39.85 


1.10 




1.00 


3.76 




3.71 


1.00 




1.00 


4.17 




465.44 


41.37 




41.35 


42.55 




42.51 


$ .23672 


$ 


.34121 


26.10 




30.74 


$ .80676 


$ 


1.08772 


101.36 




161.12 


113.87 




111.64 


101.67 




159. 19 


28.68 




22.43 


$ .57994 


$ 


1.32947 


.00572 




.00825 


.88663 




.79372 


.03092 




.03538 


% 93.99 


% 


63.04 



CAEOLINA, CLINCHFIELD AND OHIO RAILWAY 



165 



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166 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



EQUIPMENT OWNED OR LEASED. IN SERVICE OF THE COMP^^^\— Continued 
COMPANY SERVICE EQUIPMENT 





1920 


1921 


Class of Equipment 


Number 
Fully 
Owned 


Number Held 
Under Equip- 
ment Trust 


Number 
Fully 
Owned 


Number Held 
Under Equip- 
ment Trust 


Officers' and pay cars 


2 
4 
1 
2 

1 
72 




2 

24 

2 

2 




Ballast cars 


20 




Derrick cars 




Steam shovels '. 

Wrecking cars 






Other company service cars 




72 










All classes of company service 
cars 


82 


20 


102 




All classes of cars in service. ._ 


4,212 


3,851 


5,216 


2.828 



TAXES ON RAILWAY PROPERTY 
OTHER THAN U. S. GOVERNMENT TAXES 





1920 


1921 


Name of State 


Amount 

Charged to 

"Railway Tax 

Accruals" in 

Income 


Amount 
Assumed by 
Corporation 


Amount 

Assumed by 

U. S. R. A. 


Amount 

Charged to 

"Railway Tax 

Accruals" in 

Income 


Kent ucky 


$ 2,361.93 
91,765.33 
75,178.78 
79,170.30 


$ 1,961.93 
91,714.08 
61,278.78 
90,111.95 


$ 400.00 

51.25 

13,900.00 

10,941.65 


$ 2,501.68 
114.550.77 


Tennessee ■_ 

North Carolina 


87,491.00 
177,180.79 


Total 


$ 248,476.34 


$ 245,066.74 


$ 3,409.60 


$ 381.724.24 



U. S. GOVERNMENT TAXES 



Kind of Taxes 


Amount 

Charged to 

"Railway Tax 

Accruals" in 

Income 


Amount 
Assumed by 
Corporation 


Amount 

Assumed by 

U. S. R. A. 


Amount 

Charged to 

"Railway Tax 

Accruals" in 

Income 


Federal income 


$ 80,000.00 
5,641.67 
12,000.00 
8,043.55 


$ 80.000.00 
5,641.67 
12,000.00 
8,043.55 




$ 27,127.72 
4,870.00 




5,349.50 






2,918.43 










$ 105,685.22 


$ 105,685.22 




$ 40,265.65 








Grand total 


$ 354,161.56 


$ 350,751.96 


$ 3,409.60 


$ 421,989.89 



CAROLINA,- CLINCHFIELD AND OHIO RAILWAY 



167 



EMPLOYEES AND THEIR COMPENSATION 



Class of Employees 



1920 



1921 



Average 
Number of 
Employees 
in Service 



Total 
Compensc 
tion 



Average 
Number of 
Employees 
in Service 



Total 

CompensE 

tion 



General officers, $3,000 p. a. and upwards 

General officers, below S3,000 per annum 

Division officers, $3,000 p. a. and upwards. _. 

Division officers, below S3, 000 per annum 

Clerks, $900 p. a. and upwards 

Clerks, below $900 per annum 

Messengers and attendants 

Assistant engineers and draftsmen ___* 

M. W. & S. foremen. 

Section foremen 

General foremen — M. E. department 

Gang and other foremen — M. E. department. 

Machinists 

Boiler makers 

Blacks mit hs 

Masons and bricklayers 

Carpenters 

Painters and upholsterers 

Electricians 

Air-brake men 

Car inspectors 

Car repairers ". 

Other skilled laborers 

Mechanics' helpers and apprentices 

Section men 

Other unskilled laborers 

Other men in construction gangs and work trains 

Traveling agents and solicitors 

Employees in outside agencies 

Train dispatchers and directors 

Telegraphers, telephoners, and block operators 

Telegrapher-clerks 

Agent-telegraphers 

Station agents (non-telegraphers) 

Station service employees 

Yardmasters . 

Yard engineers and motormen 

Yard firemen and helpers 

Yard conductors (or foremen) 

Yard brakemen (switchmen or helpers) 

Other yard employees 

Hostlers 

Enginehouse-men 

Road freight engineers and motormen 

Road freight firemen and helpers 

Road freight conductors 

Road freight brakemen and flagmen 

Road passenger engineers and motormen 

Road passenger firemen and helpers 

Road passenger conductors 

Road passenger brakemen and flagmen 

Other road train employees 

Crossing flagmen and gatemen 

Policemen and watchmen 

Other transportati on employees 



23 
13 
5 
17 
19 
94 
47 
173 
457 
124 
30 
24 



38 
3, 
11 
4, 
154, 

5 
2, 
15, 
94, 
3 

62 
127 
31 
14 

37 
20 
10 
35 
49 
194 
100 
251 
391 
132 
29 
64 



,541.37 
,854.55 
,033.61 
,753.64 
,313.85 
244.56 
,972.57 
,937.78 
,975.22 
,858.05 
,620.00 
,317.14 
,024.03 
,132.34 
,016.00 
55.80 
,525.29 
,393.36 
,106.39 
,440.11 
,093.35 
,084.62 
,039.49 
,307.27 
,080.07 
,025.06 
,009.84 
,205.49 



,364.63 
, 200. 28 
,292.53 
,609.14 
,829.50 
,796.26 
,699.37 
,644.45 
,150.88 
,395.51 
,853.37 
,858.59 
,829.09 
,250.77 
,570.99 
,716.43 
,207.18 
,345.60 
,454.05 
,897.63 
,930.95 
,606.01 
,983.20 
,802.06 
,347.52 



24 

7 

5 

18 

16 

61 

58 

147 

358 

101 

35 

40 

2 

9 

10 

1 



60,117.68 

754.56 

21,179.20 

125.00 

166,470.54 

407.60 

6,861.17 

6,933.60 

11,683.31 

44,557.71 

2,940.00 

39,054.47 

53,888.92 

13,806.19 

5,428.08 



17,697.20 

6,941.14 

4,533.37 

18,127.44 

18,844.72 

55,799.34 

55,145.07 

98,446.78 

153,053.50 

54,654.01 

15,154.18 

47,678.39 

2,190.00 

14,927.21 

7,419.68 

719.60 

16,676.78 

8,191.61 

18,208.46 

7,217.05 

10,510.05 

8,171.69 

9,984.21 

21,440.47 

2,048.27 

18,673.56 

39,537.66 

71,185.18 

53,542.66 

40,920.85 

76,212.06 

9,012.04 

6,257.18 

4,395.98 

3,083.49 

152.33 

2,397.46 

735.00 

1,224.12 



Total 



1,732 $3,054, 



1,622 $ 1,435,317.82 



168 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

ClifFside Railroad Company 



HISTORY 

Organized 1905, under laws of North Carolina. 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President 

Vice-President 

Secretary and Treasurer 


Chas. H. Haynes 

Walter H. Haynes 

Z. O. Jenkins 


Cliffside, N. C. 
Cliffside, N. C. 
Cliffside, N C 


Auditor 


G. C. Shuford 


Cliffside, N C 









DIRECTORS 

Chas. H. Haynes, Chffside, N.C.; Walter H. Haynes, Chffside, N. C; Z. O. Jenkins, CHffside, N. C 

ROAD OPERATED 





To 


Miles 


From 


N.C. 


Total 


Cliffside, N. C. 


West Henrietta and Avondale, N.C. 




5 











CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile , 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (Interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, N. C County, $311.05; State, $76.70 



1920 



16,000.00 

3,200.00 

31,844.16 

6,368.83 

117,542.40 

23,508.48 

3,000.00 

600.00 

24,108.18 

28,167.83 

23,409.43 

4,758.40 

5,633.57 

4,681.89 

25,996.46 

2,171.37 

5,199.29 

13,500 

434.27 

none 

.03 



1921 



16,000.00 
3,200.00 

24,676.63 

4,935.33 

114,542.40 

22,908.48 

3,000.00 

600.00 

23,508.48 

32,847.81 

26,943.20 
5,904.61 
6,569.56 
5,388.64 

31,063.03 
1,784.78 
6,212.60 



356.95 



Employees: Number general officers, 4; office clerks, 1; station agents, 1; enginemen, 2; fire- 
men, 2; conductors, 1; machinists, 1; section foremen, 1; other trackmen, 4; total, 17. 



DOYEK AND SOUTHBOUND RAILROAD 

Dover and Southbound Railroad Company 



16C> 



HISTORY 

Organized December 1, 1918, under laws of North Carolina. Chapter 67, Private Laws, 1905; 
Chapter 59, Private Laws, 1907. 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President 

General Manager or Superintendent 

Secretary and Treasurer 

Traffic Manager 


W. A. Wimsatt 

D. W. Richardson 

W. B. H. Blandford 

N. S. Richardson 


Washington, D. C. 
Doyer, N. C. 
Dover, N. C. 
Dover, N. C. 



DIRECTORS 

W. A. Wimsatt, W. C. Wimsatt, W. K. Wimsatt, G. P. Lohr, all of Washington, D. C. ; N. S. Richard- 
son, B. H. Thomason, W. B. H. Blandford, all of Dover, N. C; T. D. Warren, New Bern, N. C. 

ROAD OPERATED 



From 


To 


Mi Irs 




N. C. 


Total 


Dover, N. C 


Richlands, N. C 


24 3-5 


24 3-5 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Taxes paid, N. C 



1920 



100,000.00 

4,065.45 

156,797.00 

6,373.85 

8,203.00 

333.50 

6,707.30 

68.107.11 

60,458.68 

7.648.43 

2.768.55 

2,473.90 

59,904.49 

8,202.62 

2,435.10 

333.40 

1,208.57 



1921 



100.000.00 

4,065.45 

150.968.00 

6,136.59 

28,641.81 

1,164.26 

7.300.00 

55,917.54 

45,248.65 

10,668.89 

2,273.07 

1,839.37 

47,894.76 

8,022.78 

1,946.94 

326.13 

1,249.40 



Employees: Number general officers, 5; station agents, 2; other station men, 1; conductors, I; 
other employees, 9. 



170 



N. C-. CORl'otJA TION COAf M [SSJOX 



Durham and South Carolina Railroad Company 

• HISTORY 

Organized January 20, 1905, under laws of North Carolina. Statute of January 20, l^O.i, entitled 
an Act to incorporate the Durham and South Carolina Railroad Company. 

CAPITAL STOCK. ETC. 



1920 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue. . 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile . 

Revenue from otlier sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, N. C 



1 


500.000.00 




13,329.78 




300,000.00 




8.371.10 




672.792.6)) 




17.936.35 




43.752.89 




1,166.37 




19,102.72 




112,692.42 




51,529.57 




61.162.85 




3.004.27 




1.372.75 




119.939.02 




753.40 




2.984.24 




1,639 


s 


254.47 




5.737.04 




1.552 




1.476.95 



DrRHAM AIXD SOTTHERN RAIL WAV 



171 



Durham and Southern Railway Company 



HISTORY 

Durham and Southern Railway Company organized .lanuary 13, lft04, cliartered under ti 
laws of North Carolina, Chapter 49, N'olume 1, amended Mareh 10, U»O.T. 

PRINCIPAL GENERAL OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Afldress 


President 

Vice-President 


B. N. Duke .. 

S H Reams 


New York, N. V. 
Durham N C 




W. C. Parker 

W. C. Parker _. 

Jones Fuller 

W. H. Smith \. 

S. H. Reams 


New York, N. V. 


Treasurer 

General Solicitor 


New Yoi'k, N. Y. 
Durham, N. C. 


General Manager 

Chief Engineer 


Durham, N. C. 
Durham, N. C. 









DIRECTORS 



B. N. Duke, New York, N. Y.; C. McD. Carr, Durham, N. C; J. S. Cobb, Durham, N. C: J. B. 
Mason, Durham, N. C. ; H. C. Satterfield, Durham, N. C. ; C. C. Thomas, Durham, N. C. ; S. H. Reams, 
Durham, N. C; R. L. Lindsay, Durham, N. C; J. S. Hill, Durham, N. C; J. Harper Erwin, West 
Durham. N. C; W. A. Erwin, West Durham, X. C; W. A. Erwin, Jr., Duke, N. C. 



172 



^^ C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



COMPARATIVE GENERAL BALANCE SHEET— ASSET SIDE 



Balance at 

Beginning of 

Year 1920 


Item 


lialaace at 

lieginning of 

Year 1921 


Balance at 

Close of Year 

1921 


$ 1,481,933.19 


Investments: 


$ 1.479,808.14 
7.064.41 

8.300.00 

174,625.40 


$ 


1,482,840.45 


10,390.66 




8.639.41 


8,300.00 


Investments in affiliated companies: 

Stocks 


8,300.00 


75,937.00 


Other investments: 


204,047.90 








$ 1,576,560.85 


$ 1,669,797.95 


$ 


1,703.827.76 




Current Assets: 
Cash _ 




1 23.046.21 


$ 114,527.91 

267,957.25 

*2, 746.39 

18,647.37 

51,380.91 


$ 


154.808.11 


662.75 




602,908.22 




Net balance receivable from agents and conductors 




2,014.82 


$ 


14,834.13 




Material and supplies 


53,825.91 
14,067.08 




Total current assets 

Deferred Assets: 






$ 25,723.78 


$ 449,767.05 


$ 


840,443.45 


$ 155,066.37 


$ 257,179.72 


$ 


19,327.11 




Total deferred assets 

Unadjusted Debits: 




$ 155,066.37 


$ 257,179.72 


1 


19,327.11 


1 542.42 






125,115.32 


Other unadjusted debits 

Total unadjusted debits 

Grand total 


$ 1.421.66 


$ 


260,278.08 


$ 125,657.74 


$ 1.421.66 


$ 


260,278.08 


S 1,883,008.74 


1 2.378.166.38 


$ 


2,823.876.40 









•■Credit. 



DUKHAM AND SOUTHERN RAILWAY 



178 



COMPARATIVE GENERAL BALANCE SHEET-LIABILITY SIDE 



Balance at 

Beginning of 

Year 1920 


Item 


Balance at 

Beginning of 

Year 1921 


Balance at 

Close of Year 

1921 


% 1 350 000 00 


Stock : 
Capital stock 


$ 1,350,000.00 


$ 


1,350,000.00 




Total stock - __ ^ 




$ 1.350.000.00 


$ 1,350,000.00 


$ 


1,350,000.00 




Current Liabilities: 
Traffic and car-service balances payable 




$ 4.60 


$ 319,340.39 
33,131.57 


$ 


677,191.21 
4.61 


10.12 








Total current liabilities 

Deferred Liabilities: 
Other deferred liabilities 






$ 14.72 


$ 352,471.96 


$ 


677,195.82 


$ 111.948.31 


$ 164,487.47 


$ 


12,567.17 




Total deferred liabilities 




$ 111 948.31 


$ 164,487.47 


$ 


12 567.17 




Unadjusted Credits: 
Tax liability 




$ 16.142.24 
8.573.66 


$ 11,839.66 
23,423.78 
65,314.53 


$ 


11,185.06 

8,576.82 


61.729.26 


Accrued depreciation— equipment- 

U.S. Government unadjusted credits 


68,071.67 
189,434.98 


4.981.71 


Other unadjusted credits 


*13,305.59 


79.59 




Total unadjusted credits 




$ 91,426.87 


$ 87,272.38 


« 


277,348.12 




Profit and loss balance . 




$ 329.618.84 


$ 423,934.57 


$ 


506,765.29 


$ 1.883.008.74 


$ 2,378,166.38 


$ 


2.823,876.40 









^ Debit. 



ROAD OPERATED AT CLOSE OF YEAR-1920-1921 



Name of Road or Track 


Termini Between Which 
Road Named Extends 


Miles 

of 
Road 


Miles of 
Yard Track 
and Sid- 
ings, etc. 


Total 






56.87 
2.10 


*8.24 


65.11 


Trackage Rights 
Seaboard Air Line 


East Durham to Durham 


2.10 


Total . .. 


58.97 


8.24 


67.21 









*Mileage increased .17 in 1921. 



J 74 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



RAILWAY OPERATING REVENUES 



Class oi Railway Opeiatiiiji Heveiuies 



Freight 

Passenger 

Excess baggage. 
Mail 



Express 

Switching 

Special service train. 



Total rail-line transportation revenue. 



Storage— freight 

Demurrage 

Telegraph and telephone 

Kents of buildings and other property 



Total incidental operating revenue 



Joint facility — Cr.. 
Joint facility — Dr. 



Total joint facility operating revenue 
Total railway operating revenues 



1920 



Total 

Amount of 

Revenue for 

the Year 



Comparison 

With Total 

Revenue of 

Preceding 

Year 



$ 339,063.90 $ 39,580.53 



47.584.77 
94.74 
6,768.35 
1.716.18 
2.296.26 
3,429.03 

$ 400,953.23 



$ 700. 76 

1.287.00 

875.72 

2,157.82 



$ 5,021.30 



191.70 



191.70 



$ 406.166.23 



1. -615. 47 
*27.17 

3.493.30 

275.46 

*3,343.36 

3,429.03 



$ 45,023.; 



262.04 
203. 12 
864.83 



■115.07 



'115.07 



$ 46.508.04 



Total 

Amount of 

Revenue for 

the Year 



% 435,602.21 
44.979.29 
79.63 
5.620.90 
2.217.35 
2.464.38 
1.623.67 

$ 492,587.44 



$ 718:73 

1.428.00 

.591.21 

1,896.00 



$ 1,499.85 ' $ 4,633.94 



$ 196.30 

*17.62. 



$ 178.68 

$ 497.400.06 



Comparison 

With Total 

Revenue of 

Preceding 

Year 



I 96,538.31 

*2.605.48 

*15.11 

*1. 147.44 

.501.17 

168.12 

*1.805.36 

$ 91,634.21 



$ 17.97 

141.00 

*284.51 

*261.82 



*387.36 



4.60 
47.62 



$ *13.02 

$ 91.233.83 



^Decrease. 



DIKH.AM AiND SOI 'I HERN RAILWAY 



175 



RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES— ENTIRE LINE 





.Amount of Operating 
Expenses for the Year 




1920 


1921 


I. Maintenance of Way and Structures: 
Superintendence 

Maintaining roadway and track 


$ 4.800.25 

58.393.70 

12.932.39 

13.461.01 

84.95 

4.661.89 


1 5,235.76 
70,215.27 


Maintaining track structures 


9,332.54 


Maintaining ancillary structures 


3,997.42 


Injuries to persons 


264.50 


Other way a nd structure expense 


2,243.21 


Total . 


$ 94,334.19 


$ 91,288.70 






-Maintaining joint tracks, yards, and other facihties— Dr 


$ 8.784.98 
3.370.18 


% 5,795.03 
354.75 






Total maintenance of way and structures . 


» 99.748.99 


$ 96,728.98 


II. Maintenance of Equipment: 

Superintendence 

Repairs of machinery and other apparatus 

Locomotive repairs 

Locomotive depreciation and retirements 


S 2.871.38 

1.771.89 

22,442.33 

. 3,232.32 

14,244.92 

2,217.23 

614.23 

400.51 

230.05 

492.89 


$ 6,974.20 

22,251.17 
3,234.12 


Car repairs 


12.514.74 


Car depreciation and retirements 


457.50 


Work equipment repairs 


1 010.48 


Work equipment depreciation and retirements 


436.92 


Injuries to persons 

Other equipment expenses 


157.71 
717.25 


Total 


$ 48,517.75 


$ 47.754.09 






Maintaining joint equipment at terminals — Dr. 


$ 2,245.51 
36.41- 


$ 2,553.18 


Maintaining joint equipment at terminals — Cr. 








Total maintenance of equipment 


$ 50,799.67 


% 50,307.27 






III. Traffic: 
Traffic expenses 


$ 11,190.80 


? 14.240.95 






IV. Transportation— Rail-line: 

Superintendence and dispatching 

Station service 


$ 4,780.88 

19.112.06 

839.04 

87.24 

12.296.07 

37.092.26 

5,306.49 

19.677.31 

2.800.36 

158.40 

11.162.91 

1,529.09 

10,465.34 


% 5,645.13 
18,916.84 


Other yard employees 


807.84 


Other yard expenses _ . 


1,414.81 


Train enginemen and motormen 

Fuel for train locomotives. 


11,765.67 
37,973.44 


Other train locomotive supplies and expenses 

Trainmen . ._ _ 


5,340.05 

18, 626.. 57 


Train supplies and expenses . 

Injuries to persons . 


2,962.95 
.52.57 


Loss and damage _ . ... 


5,396.26 


Other casualty expenses 


792.96 


Other rail transportation expenses 


2,284.33 






Total 


$ 125.307.45 


$ 111,979.42 







176 



N. O. CORPORATION COMMISSION 
RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES— ENTIRE UNE— Continued 



Name of Railway Operating Expense Account 



Amount of Operating 
Expenses for the Year 



1920 



1921 



IV. Transportation — Ra^l-line — Continued 

Operating joint yards and terminals — Dr 

Operating joint yards and terminals — Cr 

Operating joint tracks and facilities — Dr. __. 
Operating joint tracks and facilities — Cr 



Total transportation — rail line. 

V. Gener.^l: 

Administration 

Insurance — general 

Valuation expenses 

Other general expenses 



Total. 



General joint facility expenses — Dr. 
General joint facility expenses — Cr. 



Total general expenses. 

Grand total railway operating expenses _ 



38,359.78 

967.13 

4,541.69 

1,215.19 



25,578.40 



4,725.46 
1,559.54 



« 359,637.34 



44,485.48 
2,832.56 
4.310.87 



157,943.21 



$ 27,413.42 

12.23 



4,275.74 



$ 


31,872.31 


$ 


31,701.39 


$ 


94.76 
95.79 


$ 


96.58 






$ 


31,871.28 


J 


31,797.97 



351,018.38 



Operating ratio (ratio of operating expenses to operating revenues) 
70.57 percent for 1921. 



.54 per cent for 1920; 



DUKHAM AND SOUTHERN RAILWAY 
REVENUE FREIGHT CARRIED DURING THE YEAR 



17' 





1920 


1921 


Commodity 


Number of 
Carloads 


Number of 

Tons 
(2,000 lbs.) 


Number of 
Carloads 


Number of 

Tons 
(2,000 lbs.) 


Products of Agriculture: 
Wheat 


4 

5 

. 10 

7 

119 

150 

173 

1.052 

324 

30 

38 

9 

7 

24 

1 

5 


166 

118 

219 

121 

1,279 

2,869 

2,091 

6,742 

3,269 

621 

675 

102 

172 

313 

12 

110 


4 

4 

27 


158 


Corn 


74 


Oats 


1,938 


Other grain 




Flour and meal 


112 

184 

158 

1,893 

684 

154 

16 

16 

9 

20 
1 


1,364 




2,616 




1,987 


Tobacco 

Cotton 

Cotton seed and products, except oil 


18,819 

6,414 

10,252 

188 


Other fresh fruits 


184 


Pot at oes 

Other fresh vegetables 

Dried fruits and vegetables 


163 

251 

10 


Other products of agriculture 










Total. 


1,958 


18,879 


3,303 


44,781 






Products of Animals: 


7 
1 


112 
10 


7 


60 


Cattle and calves _ . 




Hogs . . 


1 
3 

1 


10 


Other packing-house products 


3 


62 


42 


Eggs 


11 


Butter and cheese 


2 
2 


10 
12 




Other products of animals 


1 


6 






Total 


15 


206 


13 


129 






Products of Mines: 
Bituminous coal 


663 


29,704 


862 

1 


46 733 


Coke 


21 


Iron ore 


5 
84 
22 


124 

1,258 

584 




Clay, gravel, sand, and stone 


118 
1 
22 
30 
62 


4,795 


Crude petroleum _ 


21 


Asphaltum . 


851 


Salt 


35 
25 


1,048 
627 


604 




2,020 






Total 


834 


33,345 


1,096 


55.055 






Products of Forests: 
Logs, posts, poles, and cordwood 


252 
1 

3 


4,291 
43 

10,191 
120 


181 


3.980 


Ties 




Lumber, timber, box shocks, staves, and 


347 


7,098 


(Jther products of forests 


5 






Total 


722 


14,645 


529 


11,083 







178 



(OKPOKATION <'<)M MISSION 



REVENUE FREIGHT CARRIED DURING THE )fE.AB--Contmued 





1920 


1!121 


roinnuxiity 


Nunibef of 
Carloads 


.\ umber of 

Tons 
(2,000 lbs.) 


.^J umber of 
Carloads 


Number of 

Tons 
(2,000 lbs.) 


MaNLKACTURES and MlStKLI.ANEOUS: 

Refined petroleum and its products 

Sugar, sirup, glucose, and molasses 

liails and fastenings ., 

Bar and sheet iron, structural iron, and 

iron pipe 

<)ther metals, pig, bar, and sheet 


172 

66 

1 

16 


3.374 

1.190 

57 

462 


225 
112 

1 

8 

3 

35 

86 

285 

14 

8 

5 
38 
23 

5 
15 

485 

68 

109 

5 

439 


5.721 

1.491 

5 

149 
45 


Castings, machinery, and boilers 

Cement 

Brick and artificial stone 

Lime and plaster 


34 
24 

74 
9 
11 

3 

22 

62 

1 

7 

23 

726 

43 

12 


440 

768 

2.519 

167 

165 

24 
174 
524 
5 
145 
177 
18,994 
906 
85 


369 
3,241 
10,958 

220 


Sewer pipe and drain tile 

Agricultural implements and vehicles 

other than automobiles 

Automobiles and autotrucks 

Household goods and secondhand furniture 
Furniture (new) 


108 

58 
202 
172 

31 


Beverages .. 

Ice 

Fertilizers (all kinds) 


250 

72 
10 993 


Chemicals and explosives 


1 448 


Textiles 


860 


Canned goods (all canned food products) 


87 


Other manufactures and miscellaneous . 


221 


4,197 


8,655 


Total 


1,528 


34,387 


1.976 


45,135 






Grand total, carload traffic 

Merchandise — all T..C.Tj freight 


5.057 


101,462 


6,917 


156,183 
11 660 












(irand tot^il, carload and L.C.I>. traffic 


5.057 


121.328 


6.917 


167.843 



DURHAM AND SOUTHERN RAILWAY 
STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— WITH IN THE STATE 



179 



N 



Item 


Amount 1920 


Amount 1921 


A vfrage mileage of road operated miles 


58.97- 


58.97 


Train-miles: 

Mixed . - - 


83.464 
855 


82,670 




884 








84.319 


83.55-1 






Work service 


1.460 


720 






Locomotive-miles: 

Mixed train— principal : 

Mixed train — helper 


83.464 


82,670 








Mixed trai n— total 


83.464 


82,670 


Special — principal 1 


855 


884 


Special— total ._■ . 


855 


884 


Total transportation service 


84.319 


83,554 




L460 


720 






Mixed train— freight— loaded . 

Mixed train-freight— empty 

Mixed train — caboose 


448.764 
102.907 
74,776 
82.045 


495.693 
127.860 
71.464 


Mixed train — passenger 


69.886 






.Mixed train-total . . 


708,492 


764,903 






Special train pas.senger 


5.130 


6.674 


Special train- total 


5.130 
713.622 


. 6.674 


Total transportation^ervice _ 


771.577 




5.844 


2.662 






P'reight Service: 
Tons — revenue freight 

Tons— total 


121.328 
121.328 


167,843 
167,843 


Ton- miles- re veil ne fr'.'ight 


6,883.317 


9 579 223 






Ton- miles — total 


6,883.317 


J 579 223 






Passenger Service: 
Passengers carried — revenue 


71,403 
1.481.129 


57 820 


Passenger-miles - re ven ue 


1,243,034 



180 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— WITHIN TH-E ST ATE- Continued 



Item 



Revenues and Expenses: 

Freight revenue 

Passenger revenue 

Passenger service train revenue. 



Operating revenues. 
Operating expenses . 



Net operating revenues . 



Averages per Mile of Road: 

Mixed-train miles 

Special-train miles 

Transportation service train-miles 

Work-train miles 

Locomotive-miles — transportation - 

Freight service car-miles 

Passenger service car-miles 

Freight revenue 

Passenger service train revenue 

Operating revenues 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenues 

Ton-miles— revenue freight 

Ton-miles— all freight 

Passenger-miles— revenue 



Averages per Train-mile: 

Loaded freight car-miles — mixed trains . 
Empty freight car-miles — mixed trains. 

Ton-miles— revenue freight 

Ton-miles — all freight 

Passenger train car- miles— mixed trains . 

Revenue passenger-miles 

Freight revenue 

Passenger service train revenue 

Operating revenues 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenues 



Averages per Locomotive-mile: 

Train-miles — mixed trains 

Car-miles — mixed trains 

Train-miles — special trains 

Car-miles — special trains 



Averages per Loaded Freight Car-mile: 

Ton-miles — revenue freight 

Ton-miles — all freight 

Freight revenue 



Averages per Car-mile— Passenger: 

Passenger-miles— revenue 

Passenger revenue 



Amount 1920 



339,063.90 
47,584.77 
59,593.07 



406,166.23 
359,637.34 



46.528.89 



1,141,536 

1,449 

142,986 

2,475 

142,986 

10,623 

1,480 

5,766.72 

1,010.56 

6,887.67 

6,098.64 

789.02 

116,725 

116,725 

25,116 



5.37 

1.23 

82.47 

82.47 

.98 

17.74 

4.06 

.71 

4.81 

4.26 

.55 



1.00 



1.00 



Amount 1921 



435.602.21 
47,979.29 
56,985.23 



497.400.06 
351,018.38 



146,381. 



1,402 

15 

1,417 

12 

1,417 

11,786 

1,298 

7,386.84 

966.34 

8,434.80 

5,952.49 

2,482.31 

162,442 

162,442 

21.079 



5.99 

1.55 

115.87 

115.87 

.84 

15.04 

5.27 

.69 

5.95 

4.20 

1.75 



1.00 
9.25 
1.00 
7.55 



19.32 
19.32 



1.78 
. 68654 



DURHAM AND SOUTHERN RAILWAY 181 

STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS-WITHIN THE STME-Cojitinued 



Item 



Miscellaneous Averages: 

Miles hauled — revenue freight 

Miles hauled — all freight 

Miles carried — revenue passengers . 

Revenue per ton of freight 

Revenue per ton-mile of freight ... 

Revenue per passenger 

Revenue per passenger-mile 

Operati ng rati o 



Amount 1920 



20.74 
2. 79460 
.04925 
.66642 
.03212 
85.54 



Amount 1921 



57.07 
57.07 
21.50 
2.. 59529 
.04547 
.82980 
.03859 
70.57 



REVENUE FREIGHT CARRIED DURING THE YEAR-ENTIRE LINE 





1920 


1921 


Commodity 


Number of 
Carloads 


Number of 

Tons 
(2,000 lbs.) 


Number of 
Carloads 


Number of 

Tons 
(2,000 lbs.) 


Products of Agriculture: 

Wheat 

Corn 

Oats 


44 

32 

35 

20 

108 

103 

156 

1 

1,719 

358 

14 

33 

12 

7 

6 

23 


1.594 

673 

672 

461 

1,680 

1,616 

2,170 

33 

19.785 

6,099 

205 

453 

188 

127 

76 

286 


51 

38 

32 

3 

53 
56 
204 


1,603 
1,230 

697 
38 




793 




838 


Hay, straw, and alfalfa 


2 .536 


Tobacco 




Cotton 


2.072 
515 

4 

37 

9 


20 515 


Cotton seed and products, except oil 

Citrus fruits 


9,398 
56 


Other fresh fruits 


456 


Potatoes 


126 


Other fresh vegetables . . 




Dried fruits and vegetables 


3 
32 


36 


Other products of agriculture 


508 


Total 


2,671 


36,118 


3,109 


88,830 






Animals and Products: 
Horses 'and mules 


17 

48 

3 

5 

1 
1 
1 
1 
2 


193 
411 
23 
92 
30 
12 
10 
8 
23 


8 
30 


86 




333 


Hogs 


40 




12 


Other packing-house products 




Poultry 






Butter and cheese 




15 


Hides and leather 

Other animals and products 


27 
17 






Total 


79 


802 


47 


530 






Products of Mines: 
Anthracite coal 






1.139 
2 


56 651 


Bituminous coal . 






51 


Coke 


1.310 
6 
11 


65,764 
158 

677 




Iron ore. . _ .. . . 






Other ores and concentrates 







lS-2 



N, C. COKPOKATION COMMISSION 



REVENUE FREIGHT CARRIED DURING THE YEAR— ENTIRE L\HE— Continued 





1920 1921 


r'i>riiiuoflit >■ 


.Number of 
Carloads 


Number of 

Tons 
(2,000 lbs.) 


Number of 
Carloads 


Number of 

Tons 
(2,000 lbs.) 


I'rodlct* of MisKS—Ccntinued 

Base bullion and matte 

Clay, gravel, sand and stone- 
Crude petroleum 

Asphaltum 

Salt 

Other product.s of mines 


3 

412 

5 

1 

21 

28 


84 

13.626 

184 

29 
513 
830 


253 

33 

2 

27 

17 


11.048 

883 

61 

651 

460 


Total 


1,797 


81,865 


1.473 


69.805 


Products of Forksts: 

Logs, posts, poles, and cordwood 

Ties 

Pulp wood 


780 
107 

98 

2,229 
93 


19,650 
2.919 
2.460 

50,943 
1,994 


389 
96 


9,092 
2.549 


Lumber, timber, box s hooks, staves, and 

headings 

Other products of forests 


1.700 
59 


40.372 
900 






Total 


3,307 


77,966 


2,244 


52 913 






Manufactures and Miscellaneous: 


375 

82 


8.. 551 

101 

1,194 








627 

79 
4 
2 

16 

9 

116 

71 
217 

38 

55 

2 

46 

26 

.544 

11 
638 


15.119 


Sugar, sirup, glucose, and molasses 

Boats and vessel supplies 


92 
2 347 




11 

27 

54 

12 

238 

103 

327 

55 

79 

80 
100 
90 
622 
2 
52 
725 
3 


382 

584 

1,687 
288 
3,470 
1,680 
11.349 
1.141 
1.262 

1.137 

836 

2.352 

5.836 

20 

824 

19,306 

62 


106 




40 


. Bar and sheet iron, structural iron, and 


302 


Other metals, pig, bar, and sheet 

Castings, machinery and boilers 

Cement 

Brick and artificial stone 


215 

1,825 
2,245 

7,287 


Lime and plaster 

Sewer pipe and drain tile 

Agricultural implements and vehicles other 

than automobiles 

Automobiles and autotrucks 

Household goods and secondhand furniture 

Furniture (new) 

Beverages 


1.061 

926 

18 

358 

218 

4,181 


Ice 

Fertilizers (all kinds) 

Paper, printed matter, and books 

Chemicals and explosives 


133 
11,272 


4 

125 

2 

502 


86 


Textile's 

Canned goods (all canned food products) 
Other manufactures and miscellaneous 


122 
5 

893 


1.702 

90 

15,537 


1.309 

39 

5.659 


Total 


4,061 


79.391 


3,137 


54.838 






Grand total, carload traffic 


11,915 


276, 142 
41.921 


10,010 


216,916 


Merchandise— All L. C. L. freight 


48, 172 










Grand total, carload and L. C. L. traffic 


11.915 


318,063 


10,010 


265.088 



DURH.AM AND SOUTHERN RAILWAY 



isr> 



TAXES ON RAILWAY PROPERTY 
OTHER THAN L'. S. GOVERNMENT TAXES 





a 20 


192] 


Name of State 


Amount 

Charged to 

"Railway Tax 

Accruals" in 

Income 


-Amount 
Assumed by 
Corporation 


Amount 
.Assumed by 
U. S.R. A. 


Amount 

Charged to . 

"Railway Tax 

Accruals" in 

Income 


.North Carolina 


1 12.825.52 


S 11.320.40 


$ 1,505.12 


$ 17,074.38 


Total 


1 12.825.52 


% 11,320.40 


$ 1.505.12 


$ 17.074.38 



U. S. G0\ tlR.V.VIENT TAXE 







1920 




19LI 


Kind of Tax 


Amount 

Charged to 

"Railway Tax 

Accruals" in 

Income 


Amount 
Assumed by 
Corporation 


Amount 

Assumed by 

U. S. R. A. 


Amount 

Charged to 

"Railway Tax 

Accruals" in 

Income 


Income 

Capital stock 


$ 15,541.61 
1,421.00 


1 15,541.61 
1.421.00 




$ 9,581.94 






Total U. S. Government taxes 


$ 16.962.61 


$ 16,962.61 




$ 9.581.94 


Grand total 


$ 29.788.13 


$ 28.283.01 


? 1,505.12 


$ 26.656.32 



184 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



EQUIPMENT OWNED OR LEASED IN SERVICE OF THE COMPANY 
LOCOMOTIVES 





1920 


1021 


Class of Equipment 


Number 
Fully 
Owned 


Tractive 
Power 
,000 lbs. 


Number 
Fully 
Owned 


Tractive 
Power 
,000 lbs. 


Jteam locomotives 


6 


143.0 


6 


143.00 






Total 


6 


143.0 


6 


143.00 



FREIGHT-TRAIN CARS 





1920 


1921 


Class of Equipment 


Number 
Fully 
Owned 


Aggregate 
Capacity 
in Tons 


Number 
Fully 
Owned 


Aggregate 
Capacity 
in Tons 




14 
31 
25 


420 
930 
750 


10 
30 
20 


300 




900 




600 








70 


2.100 


60 


1,800 







PASSENGER-TRAIN CARS 





1920 


1921 


Class of Equipment 


Number 
Fully 
Owned 


Total 
Seating 
Capacity 


Number 
Fully 
Owned 


Total 
Seating 
Capacity 


C caches 

Combination passenger cars 

Baggage and express cars 


8 
3 
2 


432 
108 


8 
3 
2 


432 
108 






All classes of passenger-train cars 


13 


540 


13 


540 



COMPANY SERVICE EQUIPMENT 





1920 


1921 


Cla^s of Equipment 


Number 
Fully 
Owned 


Number 
Fully 
Owned 




1 
4 


1 




4 






411 classes of company service cars 


. 5 


5 








88 


78 







IHRHAM AND SOrTHERN RAILWAY 



EMPLOYEES AND THEIR COMPENSATION 



Class of Employees 



General officers, $3,000 p. a. and upwards- 
General officers, below $3,000 per annum.. 

Clerks, $900 p. a. and upwards 

M. W. & S. foremen 

Sectio n foremen 

General foremen — M. E. department 

Machi nists 

Boiler makers 

Blacksmiths 

Carpenters 

Painters and upholsterers 

Electricians 

Car inspectors 

Car repairers 

Other skilled laborers 

Mechanics' helpers and apprentices 

Section men 

Other unskilled laborers 

Train dispatchers and directors 

Telegrapher-clerks 

Agent-telegraphers 

Road freight engineers and niotormen 

Road freight firemen and helpers 

Road freight conductors 

Road freight brakemen and flagmen 

Road passenger baggagemen 

Policemen and watchmen 

Other transportation employees 

All other employees 



Total. 



1920 



Average 
Number of 
Employees 
in Service 



Total 
Compensa- 
tion Duri-^.g 

Year 



16,300.00 
2,141.32 

12.885.12 
2,467.50 

11,631.07 
1,458.86 
5.927.19 
2,987.89 
2,399.13 
6,229.56 
953. 15 
1,716.99 
1,765.71 



4.570.52 

7.385.24 

20,126.87 

897.01 



1,050.00 
13.419.31 
9,120.46 
5.837.77 
9,223.29 
10.084.49 



3,225.28 



$ 1.56,503.73 



January to June, inc., 1921 



Average 
Number of 
Employees 
in Service 



109 



Total 
Compensa- 
tion During 

Year 



7.375.00 

1,943.32 

6,430.00 

1,350.00 

8,325.71 

1,350.00 

4.615.94 

928.30 

872.31 

1.759.55 

835.40 

851.14 

557.42 

872.00 

2,434.42 

3,366.80 

16,343.12 

698.98 

1.800.00 

810.00 

6,831.25 

3,188.30 

2,645.05 

3,098.88 

4,453.28 

824.31 

30.00 



261.81 
$ 84,825.29 



186 



N. C. CORPOKATION COMxMISSION 



EMPLOYEES, SERVICE, AND COMPENSATION— Conhnwed 

SIX MONTHS ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1921 



Reporting Division 


Average 
Number of 
Employees 

in Service 


Compensation 


I. ExKcuTivES, Officials and Staff Assistants: 
Executives, general officei's, and assistants 


1 
3 


$ 3.750.00 


Division officers, assistants, and staff assistants 


4,712.00 






Total (executives, officials, and staff assistants) 


4 


$ 8,462.00 






II. Professional, Clerical, and General: 
Clerks 


11 
1 

1 


$ 7,970.08 


Clerks 


326.55 


Watchmen (without police authority) 


30.00 


Total (professional, clerical, and general) \ Daily basis 

( Hourly basis 


13 


9 8,326.63 








III. Maintenance of Way and Structures: 
Roadmasters and genera) foremen (M of W. & S.) 


1 
1 
4 
4 

2 
2 

7 
28 

1 

1 


$ 1,350.00 


Bridge and building gang foremen (skilled labor, M. of W. & S.) 

Bridge and building carpenters 


1,117.50 
2.173.00 


Rcular apprentices (M of W & S ) 


1 142 20 


Portable steam equipment operators (M. of W. & S.) 


489.83 
632.00 


Gang or section foremen 

Track and roadway section laborers 

Maintenance of way laborers (other than track and roadway) and gar- 
deners and farmers 


5.490.00 
11,255.12 

392. 10 


Linemen and groundmen 


859.08 


Total (maintenance of way and structures) f Daily basis 


51 


1 24,900.83 









EAST CAROLINA RAILWAY 



187 



East Carolina Railway Company 



HISTORY 

Organized July 1, 1898, under laws of North Carolina. Public Laws of State of North Caro- 
lina; Chapter amended and enlarged by Private Laws of said State, ratified by General Assembly 
March 11, 1901, Chapter 362. 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President 


Henry Clark Bridgers 

Henry Clark Bridgers 

J. T. Hagans 

A. D. Fowlkes 

Henry Clark Bridgers 


Tarboro, N. C. 






Tarboro, N. C. 


Superintendent--. 

Secretary 

Treasurer 




Tarboro, N. C. 
Tarboro, N. C. 
Tarboro, N. C. 



DIRECTORS 

Henry Clark Bridgers, Tarboro, N. C; John L. Bridgers, Tarboro, N. C; A. D. Fowlkes, Tarboro 
N. C; J. T. Hagans, Tarboro, N. C; B. F. D. Albritton, Hookerton, N. C; W. J. Turnage, Farmville, 
N. C; W. R. Davis, Farmville, N. C. 

ROAD OPERATED 





To 


Miles 




N.C. 


Total 


Tarboro, N. C 


Hookerton, N. C 


38.30 


38.20 



188 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included). 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses , per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile •- 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Taxes paid, N. C 



55,500.00 
1,452.88 

300,000.00 
7,853.40 

287,0.53.82 



7,514.50 
186,590.07 
161.201.07 
25,389.00 

4,884.56 

4.219.92 
159,796.30 

4,183.15 



7,712.46 



1921 



55,500.00 

1,452.89 

300,000.00 

7,853.40 

275.103.82 

7,201.67 

12,200.00 

319.37 

7,521.04 

162,844.74 

1.55,977.61 

6,867.13 

4,262.95 

4.083.18 

143,696.97 

15,679.19 

3.761.70 

410.45 

3,468.58 

4.096.28 



Employees: Number general officers, 3; office clerks, 7; station agents, 7; other station men, 1 
cnginemen, 2; firemen, 2; conductors, 2; other trainmen, 2; machinists, 1; carpenters,!; othershop- 
men, 2; section foremen, 3; other trackmen, 12; total, 45. 



EAST TEX:S'ESSEE AND WESTERN NOKTH CAROLINA RAILROAD 



189 



East Tennessee and Western North Carolina 
Railroad Company 

Organized May 24, 1866, reorganized May 22, 1879, under the laws of Tennessee; Acts of Assem- 
bly 1865, and 1866; reorganized, Acts of Assembly passed March 4, approved March 6, 1879. 

HISTORY 

The name of this company is "EAST TENNESSEE AND WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA 
RAILROAD COMPANY." It was incorporated under and pursuant to a special Act of the Legis- 
lature of the State of Tennessee, passed May 24, 1866 — being chapter 88 of the Laws of 1865-66, section 23, 
by which the Charter of the East Tennessee and Virginia Railroad Company, passed July 27, 1848, was 
made the charter of this company. 

By decree of Chancery Court at Nashville, Tennessee, on the 15th day of November, 1871, the East 
Tennessee and Western North Carolina Railroad was sold to John Hughes etal., from whom it was 
purchased on the 16th day of February, 1876, by the present owners and reorganized under Acts of 
Assembly, State of Tennessee, passed March 4th, approved March 6, 1879. 

The East Tennessee and Western North Carolina Railroad is a narrow (36") gauge single track 
line extending from Johnson City, Tennessee, to Cranberry, N. C, a distance of about 34 miles, with a 
third rail for handling standard gavige cars between Johnson City and Elizabethton, Tennessee, a dis- 
tance of 10 miles. 

The road was opened from Johnson City, Tennessee, to Hampton, Tennessee, a distance of about 
14 miles, August 22, 1881, and from Hampton, Tennessee, to Cranberry, North Carolina, July 3, 1882. 

In 1910, a spur hne of 3-rail track was built from Buffalo Bridge (near Watauga Point, Tenn.) to 
Smallings, Tennessee, a distance of about 2 miles. 

The said railroad, including the above spur has at all times and now is operated by the said East 
Tennessee and Western North Carolina Railroad Company, whose general offices are located at John- 
son City, Tennessee. 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President 

Vice-President and General Manager 


F. P. Howe 

Geo. W. Hardin 

A. H. Fisher 

J. E. Vance 


Johnson City, Tenn. 
Johnson City, Tenn. 


Treasurer 


Johnson City, Tenn. 



DIRECTORS 

F. P. Howe, Philadelphia, Pa.; Henry Lewis, Philadelphia, Pa.; Geo. W. Hardin, Johnson City, 
Tenn.; J. H. Epps, Jonesboro, Tenn.; Edgar P. Earl, Philadelphia, Pa.; Aria Pardee, Philadelphia, 
Pa.; J. E. Vance, Johnson City, Tenn. 

ROAD OPERATED 



From 


To 


Miles 




N. C. 


Total 


Johnson City, Tenn. 


Cranberry, N. C 


3.18 


36.18 







190 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 





1920 


1!21 . 


Capital Stock 

Capital stock, per mile 


$ 490.800.00 

13.565.50 

500,000.00 

13.819.79 

924,876.06 

25.563.18 

293,227.60 

8,104.68 

33,667.86 

446,985.39 

305.698.35 

141.287.04 

12,354.48 

8.449.37 

359.737.12 

80,123.01 

9.942.98 

246.912 

$ 2.214.56 

7.125.26 

.0302 

842.46 


$ 490.800.00 
13 565 50 


Funded debt 


500 000 00 


Funded debt, per mile 


13 819 79 


Cost of road 


927 055 76 


Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 


25,623.43 
293 438 73 


Cost of equipment, per mile _ . . 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 


8.110.52 
33,733.95 
276,451.91 


Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 


207,154.17 
69,297.74 


Operating revenue, per mile . 

Operating expenses, per mile 


7.641.01 

5,725.65 

194,940.36 




74,933.87 


Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 


5.388.07 
224,017 

« 6.577.68 
11.857.05 


Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, N. C 


.03422 
74.80 



Employees: Number general officers, 4; office clerks, 5; station agents, 8; other station men, 22 
enginemen,3; firemen, 3; conductors, 3; other trainmen, 7; machinists,]; carpenters, 4; other .shop- 
n.cn, 5; telegraph operators, 2; section foremen, 5; other trackmen, 23; othe- ' ni'-lovees, 3; total 98. 



ELKIN AND ALLEGHANY RAILROAD 



191 



Elkin and Alleghany Railroad Company 



HISTORY 

Organized January 31, 1920, under the laws of North Carolina. 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President 

General Manager or Superintendent 

Secretary and Treasurer 


H. G. Chatham 

T. D. Chatham 

Thurmond Chatham 

J. P. Ipock 


Winston-Salem, N. C. 
Elkin, N. C. 
Winston-Salem, \ C 


Traffic Manager 


Elkin, N. C. 



DIRECTORS 

H. G. Chatham, Winston-Salem, N. C; G. T. Roth, Elkin, N. C; J. W. Ring, Elkin, N. C. 
R. M. Chatham, Elkin, N. C; Alex Chatham, Elkin, N. C; J. C. Smoot, No. Wilkesboro, N. C. 
R. A. Doughton, Sparta, N. C; A. A. Woodruff, Cherry Lane, N. C; A. M. Smith, Elkin, N. C. 
A. G. Click, Elkin, N. C. 

ROAD OPERATED 





From 


To 


Miles 




N. C. 


Total 


Elkin, N. C. 


Veneer, N. C 


15 


15 







CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 





1920 


1921 


Capital stock ... 


S 56.000.00 
3.733.33 

47.000.00 

3.133.33 

9.000.00 

600.00 

3.733.33 

17.535.99 

18.328.31 

792.32 

1.169.06 

1,221.88 

14,573.70 
2,203.00 
1,171.58 


$ .56.000.00 




3.733.33 




45,000.00 


Cost of road, per mile 


3.000.00 


Cost of equipment .... 


11 000.00 


Cost of equipment, per mile 


733 33 


Cost of road and equipment, per mile 


3 733 33 


Operating revenue 


21 315 94 


Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) .. . 


28,444.17 


Net operating revenue . . . 


*7, 128.23 


Operating revenue, per mile 


1,421.06 


Operating expenses, per mile 


1 896 2« 


Total freight revenue . 


14 929 14 


Total passenger train service revenue 


2,172.62 

995.28 

2 480 


Freight revenue, per mile 


Total number passengers carried earning revenue 


Passenger service train revenue, per mile 


$ 146.88 
759.09 


$ 144.17 
4 214 18 


Revenue from other sources . 


Average receipts per passenger, per mile 


87 


Taxes paid, N. C 


372.08 


376.60 





Employees: Number general officers, 5; office clerks, 1; station agents, 1; enginemen, 1; 
men, 1; conductors, 1 ; other trainmen, 1; section foremen, 1; other trackmen , 5; total, 17. 



fire- 



^Deficit. 



19: 



N. C. CORPOKATION COMMISSION 



French Broad Railroad Company 

HISTORY 

Organized June 5, 1919, under laws of North Carolina, Chapter 61 of the Revisal of 1905. 



OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President 

General Manager or Superintendent 

Secretary and Treasurer 


A. D. Pickering 

W. M. Powers 

W H Baker, Jr 


Stackhouse, N. C. 
Stackhouse, N. C. 
Huntington, VV. Va. 


Traffic Manager 


None 







DIRECTORS 

R. L. Hutchinson, Huntington, W. Va.; VV. H. Baker, Jr., Huntington, W. Va.; H. T. Lovett, 
Huntington, W. Va.; T. H. Griffith, Huntington, VV. Va.; H. H. Vansant, Ashland, Ky. 

ROAD OPERATED 



From 


To 


Miles 


N. C. 


Total 


Pelva, N. C 


Runion, N. C 


8 


8 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt , per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included). 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile . 

Total freight revenue . 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, N. C 



1920 



(5.000.00 
9,375.00 



Leased 

Leased 

Leased 

Leased 

Leased 
39,227.92 
60,325.46 
21,097.54 
4.903.49 
7,540.68 
39,227.92 



4,903.49 



1921 



75,000.00 
9,375.00 
none 
none 
Leased 
Leased 
Leased 
Leased 
Leased 
29.374.72 
33,058.31 
*3, 683.59 
3.671.84 
4,132.68 
29.374.72 
none 

3,671.84 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 



Employees: Number general officers, 3; office clerks, 2; station agents, 1; enginemen, 1; firemen, 
1; conductors, 1; other trainmen, 1; section foremen, 1; other trackmen, 6; total, 17, 



'Deficit. 



KIIVSTON CAKOLINA RAILROAD 



193 



Kiiistoii Carolina ailroad Company 

HISTORY 

Organized January 25, 1910, under laws of North Carolina; State of North Carolina, especially 
provisions of sections 1238-39-40-41 of Pell's Revisal of 1908 N. C, page 641. 



OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




G. R. Loyall 


Norfolk, Va. 


Superintendent 

Secretary 


J. C. Poe 

M. S. Hawkins 

J. F. George 

J. F. Dalton 


Kinston, N. C. 
Norfolk, Va. 


General Freight 


and Paseenger Agent 


Norfolk, Va. 



DIRECTORS 

G. R. Loyall, Norfolk, Va.; C. I. Millard, Norfolk, Va.; L. C. Millard, Norfolk, Va.; C. W. Akers, 
Princeton, W. Va. 

ROAD OPERATED 




Kinston, N. C 



30.47 



CAPITAL STOCK. ETC. 



I 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue... 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile . 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, N. C 



1920 



1921 



i 35,000.00 


$ 35,000.00 


1,149.33 


1,149.33 


none 


33,750.00 


none 


1,187.64 


57,866.39 


57,871.86 


1,899.13 


1,899.30 


33,861.80 


33.261.80 


1,111.32 


1,091.62 


3,010.44 


2,990.93 


62,943.74 


75,874.78 


60,415.42 


55,461.97 


2,528.32 


20,385.81 


2,065.76 


2,489.26 


1,982.78 


1,820.21 


52,374.29 


64,750.39 


8,704.49 


10,616.16 


1,718.88 


2,125.05 


19,313 


12,728 


285.67 


$ 348.41 


1,864.97 


481.23 


.014 


.03397 


817.45 


2.306.17 



Employees: Number general officers, 5; office clerks, 2; station agents, 2; enginemen, 1; firemen, 1; 
conductors, 1; other trainmen, 2; machinists, 1; other shopmen, 2; section foremen, 2; other traek- 

men, 8; total, 27. 



194 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



Laiirinburg and Southern Railroad Company 



HISTORY 

Organized March 8, 1909, under laws of North Carolina; Private Laws 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




John F. McNair 












C. E. Beman 






Z. V. Pate __ 




Traffic Manager 


G. Y. Jones 


Laurinburg, N. C. 



DIRECTORS 

John F. McNair, Laurinburg, N. C; N. G. Wade, Jacksonville, Fla.; A. A. James, Laurinburg, 
N. C.; D. M. Flynn, Jacksonville, Fla.; A. M. Fairley, Laurinburg, N. C; Jas. L. McNair, Laurin- 
burg, N. C.; John Blue, Laurinburg, N. C. 

ROAD OPERATED 





From 


To 


Miles 




N. C. 


Total 


Johns, N. C 


Raeford, N. C 


30 


30 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Taxes paid, N. C. 



1920 



225.000.00 

12,, 500. 00 

119.000.00 

6,611.11 

161.079.10 

8.948.83 

45.134.95 

2.507.50 

11.456.33 

116.734.19 

72.835.30 

43.898.86 

6,485.23 

4,046.40 

115,828.49 

905. 70 

6,434.91 

50.31 

1,477.02 



1921 



225.000. 

7.500. 

119.000. 

3.966. 

226.079. 

7.535. 

45.134. 

1,504. 

9.040. 

106.744. 

68,939. 

37,804. 

3,558. 

2,297. 

105.744. 

999. 

3,524. 

33. 

1,881. 



82 



Employees: Number general officers, 5; office clerks, 2; station agents, 3; other station men, 
riigincrnen, 2; firemen, 2; conductors 1 ; other trainmen, 2; section foremen, 3; other trackmen, 
total, 46. 



LAWNDALE RAILWAY AND INDUSTRIAL COMPANY 



195 



Lawndale Railway and Industrial Company 



HISTORY 

Organized January, 1904, under laws of North Carolina; under amended charter of Cleveland 
Cotton Mills by Legislature 1901. 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President 


John F Schenck, Sr 


Lawndale, N C 


General Manager or Superintendent 


John F Schenck Sr 


Lawndale, N C 


JohnF. Schenck, Sr 

John F. Schenck, Jr. 




Secretary 

Traffic Manager 


Shelby, N. C. 


Carme Elam 


Lawndale, N. C. 



DIRECTORS 

John F. Schenck, Sr., Lawndale, N. C; Hal E. Schenck, Lawndale, N. C; John F. Schenck, Jr. 
Shelby, N. C; F. C. Reynolds, 70 Thomas St., New York, N. Y.; Geo. W. Morgan, 70 Thomas St. 
New York, N. Y. 

ROAD OPERATED 



From 


To 


Miles 




N. C. 


Total 


Lawndale, N. C 


Shelby, N. C 


11 


11 



CAPITAL STOCK. ETC. 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile . 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included). 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Taxes paid, N. C 



1920 



60,000.00 
6,465.52 

57,296.67 
6,174.21 

22,132.73 
2,384.99 
8.559.20 

18,350.70 

27,224.65 

*8.873.95 
1.660.69 
2,463.77 

17.340.75 

1.009.95 

1,569.30 

91.40 



284.68 



60,000.00 

6,465.52 

57,451.02 

6.191.58 

22,275.58 

2.400.04 

8.591.62 

18,951.67 

18,507.30 

447.37 

1.715.08 

1.674.87 

18,480.24 

471.43 

1.672.42 

42.66 

ine 

353.84 



Employees: Number general officers, 2; office clerks, 2; station agents, 2; enginemen, 1; conduct" 
tors, 1; other trainmen, 2; machinists, 1; carpenters, 1; other shopmen, 2; section foremen, 1; other 
trackmen, 7; total, 23. 



We own 9.28 miles and use 1.77 miles of Seaboard Air Line Railway Company' 
miles operated. 



track, making 11.05 



'Deficit. 



196 



N. C. COKPORATION COMMISSION 



Linville River Railway 



HISTORY 

Originally incorporated as the "LINVILLE RIVER RAILROAD COMPANY" under the general 
laws of the State of North Carolina, by letters of incorporation bearing date of July 30, 1896. 

The said Linville River Railroad Company, after having begun construction of a railroad in Mitch- 
ell County, North Carolina, became involved in debt and failed, and pursuant to a decree of the Superior 
Court of Mitchell County at the April, 1898, term, was sold to Isaac T. Mann. 

The Linville River Railway Company was issued a Certificate of Incorporation by the Secretary 
of State of North Carolina under date of August 29, 1899, and by virtue of deed bearing date of Septem- 
ber 22, 1899, acquired the railroad property of the sdd Isaac T. Mann. 

This railroad is a narrow (36") gauge single track line, extending from Cranberry, North Carolina, 
to Pineola, North Carolina, a distance of about 12 miles, and from Montezuma, N. C, to Boone, N. C, 
a distance of about 22 miles — total length about 34 miles. 

The line was partially constructed between Cranberry and Pineola in the years 1897-8 by the Lin- 
ville River Railroad Company, and completed between those poinfs by Isaac T. Mann, during the year 
1899. The line was extended from Montezuma to Shulls Mills in 1916, and from Shulls Mills to Boone 
in 1918. 

OFFICERS 





Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President 




Edgar P. Earle 


Johnson City, Tenn. 


Vice-President 


Aria Pardee 


Johnson City, Tenn. 


Secretary 

Treasurer 

General Manager 


A. H.Fisher 

J.E.Vance 

Geo. W. Hardin 


Johnson City, Tenn. 
Johnson City, Tenn. 
Johnson City, Tenn. 



DIRECTORS 

Frank P. Howe, Philadelphia, Pa.; Edgar P. Earle, Philadelphia, Pa.; Henry Lewis, Philadelphia, 
Pa.; Aria Pardee, Philadelphia, Pa.; Geo. W. Hardin, Johnson City, Tenn.; J. E. Vance, Johnson 
City, Tenn.; J. H. Epps, Jonesboro, N. C; D. W. Mackie, Cranberry, N. C. ' 

ROAD OPERATED 



From 


To 


Miles 


N. C. 


Total 


Cranberry, N. C 

Montezuma, N. C. 


Pineola, N. C 

Boone, N. C 


12 
22 


34 







rJiNVri.F.E RIVER RAILAVAY 



197 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included). 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, N. C 



450,000.00 


% 4.50.000.00 


13,235.29 


13.235.29 


none 


none 


none 


none 


86,054.36 


87,096.74 


2,531.01 


2,561.66 


51,433.57 


83,680.48 


1.512.75 


2.461.19 


4,043.76 


5,022.85 


181,480.48 


125,193.27 


146,001.13 


112,682.98 


35,479.35 


12,510.29 


5,337.66 


3,682.15 


4,294.15 


3,314.20 


145,669.78 


94,737.49 


33,764.10 


29,104.43 


4,284.40 


2.786.39 


83,460 


67,010 


993.06 


$ 856.01 


2.046.60 


1,351.35 


.0320 


.02529 


2,381.32 


1.548.03 



Employees: Number general officers, 4; office clerks, 3; station agents, 7; other station men, 2; 
enginemen, 3; firemen, 3; conductors, 3; other trainmen, 6; machinists, 1; other shopmen, 1; 
section foremen, 5; other trackmen, 23; other employees, 3; total, 64. 



198 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



Louisville and Nashville Railroad Company 

HISTORY 

Organized March 5, 1850, under laws of Kentucky; acts of Kentucky Legislature, approved 
March 5, 1850 (Acts 1849-50, page 427), and numerous amendments. 

OFFICERS 



Title 



President 

General Manager or Superintendent- 
Secret ary 

Treasurer 

Comptroller 



Name 



VV. L. Mapother 
B. M. Starks.-__ 

E. S. Locke 

J. H. Ellis 

A. J. Pharr 



Official Address 



Louisville, Ky. 
Louisville, Ky. 
Louisville, Ky. 
Louisville, Ky. 
Louisville, Ky. 



DIRECTORS 

August Belmont, New York; John L Waterbury, Morristown, New Jersey; H. Walters, Baltimore, 
Md.; Edw. W. Sheldon, New York; L. W. Botts, Louisville, Ky.; W. L. Mapother, Louisville, Ky.; 
F. B. Adams, New York; Geo. C. Jenkins, Baltimore, Md.; Geo. B. Elliott, Wilmington, N. C.; Lyman 
Delano, Wilmington, N. C; J. J. Nelligan, Baltimore, Md.; J. R. Kenly, Wilmington, N. C; Fred- 
erick \V. Scott, Richmond, Va. 

ROAD OPERATED 



From 


To 


Miles 




N.C. 


Total 


Georgia-North Carolina State Line 


Murphy, N. C 


13.20 


5.038.19 



1 



LOUISVILLE AND NASHVILLE RAILROAD 



199 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of eciuipment, per mile__ 
Cost of road and equipment, 

per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest 
on bonds not included) _ 

Net operating revenue. i 

Operating revenue, per mile 
Operating expenses, per mile_ 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service 

revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile . _ _ 
Total number passengers car- 
ried earning revenue 

Passenger service train rev- 
enue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources. 
Average receipts per passen- 
ger, per mile 

Taxes paid, N. C 



Entire Line 



1920 



$ 72.000.000.00 

14,395.19 

183,266,170.00 

36,641.00 

234,035,186.87 

48.442.96 

77,979,210.78 

15,929.63 

64,372.59 
127.297.531.52 

123.860,800.13 

3,436,731.39 

25,250.68 

24,568.97 

91,633,679.13 

33,714.042.55 
18,176.42 

17,482,098 

S 6,687.50 

1,949,809.84 

3.109 
5,203.66 



1921 



$ 72,000,000.00 

14,427.61 

191,991,995.00 

38,472.03 

242,052.184.68 

48.581.05 

91,071,505.74 

18,636.91 

67,217.96 
117,138.366.64 

108,667,628.11 

8,470,738.53 

23,234187 

21,554.67 

87,132.963.75 

28,240,637.10 
17,283.18 

14,054,496 

$ 5.601.64 

1,764,755.79 



North Carolina 



1920 



3.382 
6,224.06 



190, 010. iO 

14,395.19 
483.661.20 

36,64L00 
639,447.07 

48.442.96 
210,271.11 

15,929.63 

64,372.59 
333.308.97 

324,310.40 
8,998.59 
25.250.68 
24,. 568. 97 

239,928.74 

88,275.00 
18,176.42 



6,687.50 
5,105.22 



3.109 



1921 



190,444.4.1 

14.427.61 
.507,830.79 

38.472.03 
641,269.86 

48. ,581. 05 
246,007.21 

18,636.91 

67,217.96 
306,700.28 

284,521.64 
22.178.64 
23.234.87 
21,, 554. 67 

228,137.97 

73,941.64 
17,283.18 



5,601.64 
20.67 



3.382 



Employees: Number general officers, 460; office clerks, 5,112; station agents, 382; other station 
men, 2,268; enginemen, 1,424; firemen, 1,520; conductors, 1,289; other trainmen, 3,762; machinists, 
1,388; carpenters, 4,666; other shopmen, 6,326; telegraph operators, 866; section foremen, 982; o!h<"r 
trackmen, 9,504; other employees, 5,880; total, 45,829. 



200 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



Maxton, Alma and Southbound Railroad Company 



HISTORY 

Organized June, 1911, under laws of North Carolina; Chapter 
N. C, Session 1911. 

OFFICERS 



Page 199, Private Laws 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President 

General Manager or Treasurer 

Secretary 


A. J. McKinnon 

Morrison Peterson 

C. J. Cottingham 

Morrison Peterson 


Maxton, N. C. 
Alma, N. C. 
Alma, N. C. 
Alma, N. C. 







DIRECTORS 

A. J. McKinnon, Maxton, N. C; C. J. Cottingham, Alma, N. C; John W. Ward, Rowland, N. C. 
A. L. Bullock, Rowland, N. C; Morrison Peterson, Alma, N. C. 





ROAD OPERATED 






From 


To 


Miles 
N. C. Total 


Alma, N. C._-- 




Rowland, N. C 


15.15 





CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Capital stock . 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

C ost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue... 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, N. C 



1920 



1921 



$ 


75,000.00 


$ 


75,000.00 




4,950.43 




4,950.43 




none 




none 




none 




none 




116,508.38 




116.508.38 




7.690.32 




7,690.32 




21,027.25 




21,027.25 




1.387.92 




1,387.92 




3,078.24 




9,078.24 




34.871.98 




32,999.25 




48.212.18 




31,361.42 




*13,340.20 




1.637.83 




2,301.78 




2.178.17 




3,182.32 




2.070.06 




27,828.38 




29,370.42 




4,539.47 




1,308.00 




1,836.85 




1,938.64 




1.^07,500 




4,360 


$ 


299.63 


$ 


86.34 




2.504.13 




2,320.83 




.0314 




.036 




'100.00 


. 








Employees: Number general officers, 3; office clerks, 2; station agents, 3; other station men, 1; 
enginemen, 1; firemen, 1; conductors, 1; other trainmen, 1; section foremen, 1; other trackmen, 7; 
total, 21. 



*Dpfi( 



NAERON CENTRAL RAILROAD 



201 



Narron Central Railroad Company 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




Wiley Narron 

J. O. Narron 

J. F. Hill 

J. F. Hill 


Gladys, N. C. 


General Manager or Superintendent 

Secretary and Treasurer 

Traffic Manager 


Kenly, N. C. 
Kenly, N. C. 
Kenly, N. C. 



DIRECTORS 

J. R. Johnson, Kenly, N. C, Route 2; W. M. Johnson, Kenly, N.C.,Route2; S. A. Boyett, Kenly, 
N. C, Route 2. 

ROAD OPERATED 



From 


To 


Miles 


N. C 


Total 


Kenly, N. C 


Dixie, N. C 


10 





CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Taxes paid, N. C 



1920 


25,000.00 


2,500.00 


12.000.00 


1,200.00 


3,000.00 


300.00 


7,000.00 


700.00 


1,000.00 


3,500.00 


3,500.00 


3.50.00 


.350 


103.00 



202 



X. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



Norfolk and Western Railway Company 

HISTORY 

Organized under Act of General Assembly of Virginia, approved January 15th, 1896, entitled, 
"An Act authorizing the purchasers of the railroads and property of the Norfolk and Western Railroad 
Company, sold by foreclosure of a deed of trust or mortgage thereon, to become and be a corporation, 
to adopt a name therefor, and to possess and exercise general and other power." 

PRINCIPAL GENERAL OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President 

Vice-President 


N. D. Maher 

A C Needles 


Roanoke, Virginia 
Roanoke, Virginia 
Roanoke, Virginia 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Philadelphia, Pa 


Vice-President 

Vice-Presi dent 

Secretary 


Chas. S. Churchill 

E. H. Alden 

I. W. Booth 


Assistant Secretary 


L. W. Cox 


Philadelphia, Pa 


Treasurer 


Jos. B. Lacy 

W. S. Hurt '. 

Theo. W. Reath 

F. M. Rivinus 

Joseph W. Coxe 

W. H. Wilson 

Gooch Vaughan 

J. S. Wynn 

Walter Macdowell 

Chas. E. Harris 

I. V. Jessee 

B. F. Pence 

W. J. Jenks 

Jos. E. Crawford 

A. Kearney 

E. A. Blake 

J. T. Carey 

J. R. Ruffin 


Roanoke, Virginia 


Assistant Treasurer 


Roanoke, Virginia 


General Counsel 

General Solicitor 

Comptroller 


Philadelphia, Pa. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Roanoke, Virginia 


Assistant Comptroller 

Assistant to Comptroller 

Assistant to Comptroller 

Auditor of Receipts 

Assistant Auditor of Receipts 

Auditor Disbursements 

Tax and Insurance Agent 

General Manager 

Chief Engineer 

Superintendent of Motive Power 

General Superintendent 

General Superintendent 


Roanoke, Virginia 
Roanoke, Virginia 
Roanoke, Virginia 
Roanoke, Virginia 
Roanoke, Virginia 
Roanoke, Virginia 
Roanoke, Virginia 
Roanoke, Virginia 
Roanoke, Virginia 
Roanoke, Virginia 
Roanoke, Virginia 
Bluefield, W. Va. 




B. W. Herrman 






W. B. Bevill 

W. C. Saunders 













DIRECTORS 



Victor Morawetz, New York, N. Y.; John P. Green, Philadelphia, Pa.; Joseph Wood, Pittsburg, 
Pa.; W. W. Atterbury, Philadelphia, Pa.; M. C. Kennedy, Philadelphia, Pa.; David W. FHckwir, 
Roanoke, Virginia; Samuel Rea, Philadelphia, Pa.; N. D. Maher, Roanoke, Va.; Childs Frick, 
Roslyn, L. I., N. Y.; E. H. Alden, Philadelphia, Pa.; A. C. Needles, Roanoke, Virginia; 
F. S. Royster, Norfolk, Virginia. 



NORFOLK AND WESTERN 



2oa 



COMPARATIVE GENERAL BALANCE SHEET 



Balance at 

Beginning of 

Year 1920 


Assets 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1920 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1921 


$ 298 620 458.24 


Investments: 


1 312,791,863.30 

24,645.39 

3,180,234.91 

1,434,241.42 

303,359.50 

3,652,647.70 

4,706.40 
9,815,244.23 


S 318.089.258.27 


8,233.32 
2,801,425.02 

1 592,106.56 


Deposits in lieu of mortgaged property sold 
Miscellaneous physical property 

Investments in affiliated companies: 

Stocks .- . 


19,925.68 
3,564,776.76 

1,4.52,471.42 


280 965.00 




211,122.00 


4 089 315.69 


Advances 


3,603,889.75 


4,806.40 

8,703,213.64 

103.15 


Other investments: 
Stocks - -- 


4,696.40 


Bonds 


12.396,968.98 




Total investments 






$ 316,100,627.02 


% 331,206,942.85 


S 339,343,109.26 




Current Assets: 
Cash 

Spec al deposits 




$ 1,766,644.73 


$ 2,221,481.95 


$ 5,591,626.87 
600,000.00 


12,743.16 
29,666.46 

41,752,819.57 

848,448.24 

17,603.39 


Loans and bills receivable 

Traffic and car-service balances receivable. _ 
Net balance receivable from agents and 

conductors 

Miscellaneous accounts receivable 

Material and supplies 

Interest and dividends receivable 


540,770.52 
3,444,769.34 

1,250,534.09 

31,319,853.43 

14,287,476.12 

38,263.43 

51,526.64 


678,633.86 
2,463,764.78 

648,803.70 

3,260,212.39 

12,702,711.40 

46,852.26 




Other current assets 


37,883.00 




Total current assets 

Deferred Assets: 
Working fund advances 




$ 44,427,925.55 


$ 53,154,675.52 


$ 26,030,488.26 


$ 18,997.25 


S 21.214.25 


$ 14.771.87 




U. S. Government deferred assets 


49,894,954.33 


39,260,560.49 


Other deferred assets 


47,506,927.21 


17,640,080.00 




Total deferred assets 

Unadjusted Debits: 
Rents and insurance premiums paid in 
advance 

Other unadjusted debits 




$ 39,279,557.74 


$ 47,528,141.46 


$ 67,549,806.20 


$ 6,495.88 
78,177.69 


S 49,271.64 
865,408.59 


$ 16,784.57 
1,055,129.01 




Total unadjusted debits 




S 84,673.57 


$ 914,680.23 


S 1,071,913.58 


$ 399,'892,783.88 


$ 432,804,440.06 


$ 4.33,995,317.30 









204 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



COMPARATIVE GENERAL BALANCE SHEET— Continued 



Balance at 

Beginning of 

Year 1920 


Liabilities 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1920 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1921 . 


$ 144,399,100.00 


Stock: 
Capital stock 


1 144,473,400.00 


$ 144,512,000.00 




Total stock 

Long-term Debt: 
Funded debt unmatured 




$ 144,399,100.00 


$ 144,473,400.00 


$ 144,512,000.00 


$ 105,973,300.00 


$ 114,241,000.00 


$ 113,111,900.00 


$ 105,973,300.00 


$ 114,241,000.00 


$ 113,111,900.00 




Current Liabilities: 

Traffic and car-service balances payable 

Audited accounts and wages payable 

Miscellaneous accounts payable 




1 . 48,685.06 
75,671.56 
90,840.31 


8 380,285.37 

6,682,530.08 

483,266.03 

549,225.00 

15,513.00 

6,000.00 

229,923.00 

1,299,540.83 


$ 107,359.48 

2,859,350.25 

421,870.19 


617,717.38 


Interest matured unpaid 


524,368.50 


14,792.00 


Dividends matured unpaid 


20,926.00 


6,000.00 


Funded debt matured unpaid 


6,000.00 


229,923.00 


Unmatured dividends declared 


229,923.00 


1,105,307.66 


Unmatured interest accrued 


1,277,996.33 




Total current liabilities 




$ 2,188,936.97 


$ 9,646,283.31 


$ 5,447,793.75 




Deferred Liabilities: 








$ 40,301,386.36 


$ 46,320,672.33 




$ 55,778,168.81 


17,647,023.42 








$ 46,320,672.33 


$ 55,778,168.81 


$ 57,948,409.78 




Unadjusted Credits: 
Tax liability 




$ 1,765,406.36 


$ 2,185,537.18 

13,275.00 

530,536.15 

402,507.42 

7,037,780.75 

22,098,460.76 

116,697.20 

523,020.40 

32,907,814.86 


$ 2,045.525.56 


14 000.00 


Premium on funded debt 








486,713.31 


279,360.11 


Operating reserves 




3,414,898.32 


Accrued depreciation—road 


8.268,205.01 


14,861,854.62 




24,006,869.69 


97,297.76 


Accrued depreciation— miscellaneous phy- 
sical property 


172.615.77 




U. S. Government unadjusted credits 

Other unadjusted credits 




10,499,113.95 


1,252,923.99 








$ 30,931,931.12 




$ 36,232,853.33 




Corporate Surplus: 
Additions to property through income and 
surplus 

Total appropriated surplus 






S 38,150,835.60 


$ 40,768,084.09 


$ 41,217,989.81 


$ 38,150,835.60 
31,928,007.86 


$ 40,768,084.09 
34,989,688.99 


$ 41,217,989.81 
35,524,370.63 




Total corporate surplus 

Grand total 




$ 70,078,843.46 


$ 75,757,773.08 


$ 76,742,360.44 


S 3S9 £92 7^3 S8 


$ 432,804,440.06 


$ 433,995.317.30 









I 



NORFOLK AND WESTERN 



205 



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if 



I r^ 



e =3 c 
O aa 



oc 




o 




H 








OC 




DC 




liJ 




H 




Q 




Z 




< 




CO 


^ 


UJ 


a 


< 


-S 


1- 


o 


O) 


a 






> 


(^ 


1 


>i 


cc 


XI 



eS-rJ 



05 .— I <>).—( C^ 

00 lO ' ' ' 

CO O '-I n 



y-l t- 



05 lO C^ o o o 

00 CO CO -^ '—I r^ 

CO C^ ^ CO <M I>- 






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CO '-< I c^ 



O »0 00 »o 



CO O lO t^ 



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Oi t^ lO CO 



73 c3 
c3 O 



U-g 



>H 'Ei 



M h != G .i 



f> ^.g ^ t^ o 



206 



N. C. COKPORATIOX COMMISSION 



RAILWAY OPERATING REVENUES— ENTIRE LINE 



Class of Operating Revenues 



Freight 

Passenger 

Excess baggage 

Mail 

Express 

Other passenger-train . . _ 
Switching 

Special service train 

Other freight-train 

Water transfers — freight 



Total rail-line transportation revenue__ 

Total water-line transportation revenue 

Dining and buffet 

Hotel and restaurant 

Station, train, and boat privileges 

Parcel room 

Storage — freight 

Storage — baggage 

Demurrage 

Telegraph and telephone 

Grain elevator 

Stockyard 

Power 

Rents of buildings and other property 

Miscellaneous 

Total incidental operating revenue 

Joint facility — Cr 

Joint facility — Dr 

Total joint facility operating revenue _ . 

\ 

Total railway operating revenues 



1920 



Total 

Amount of 

Revenue for 

the Year 



$73,918,301.04 

10,374,128.93 

60,906.01 

1,471,606.72 

935,541.78 

95,907.49 

386,526.82 

30,323.29 

7,337.02 



$87,280,579.10 



267,629.56 

61,519.35 

47,020.66 

16,871.21 

91,397.62 

3,910.24 

116,082.33 

649.33 

3,341.38 

19,807.01 

82,377.87 

69,591.66 

425,628.48 



$1,205,826.70 



$ 10,706.73 
*7,756.50 



2,950.23 



$88,489,356.03 



Comparison 

With Total 

Revenue of 

Preceding 

Year 



$11,237,273.06 

*450,334.01 

1,071.47 

998,522.52 

99,977.18 

70,979.59 

*4,013.81 

1,346.20 

1,568.77 

*378.81 



$11,756,057. 



11,113.74 

16,441.00 

*1,718.54 

1,316.92 

*72,910.88 

*335.53 

*252,539.53 

649.33 

*71.71 

541.50 

21,610.20 

6,631.12 

77,004.08 



$ *192,268.30 



$ *1,207.92 
1,175.22 



*32.70 



$11,563,756.! 



1921 



Total 

Amount of 

Revenue for 

the Year 



$67,294,971.72 

10,077,887.07 

70,064.63 

995,686.57 

782,994.43 

96,876.96 

295,227.18 

31,689.73 

3,077.01 



$79,648,475.30 



205,529.07 
50,891.30 
46,171.49 
15,891.62 
91,574.88 
4,749.20 

291,519.96 

123.07 

10,515.62 

10,389.68 

31,114.01 

*31,683.91 

387,098.16 



$1,113,884.15 



$ 5,958.30 
*7,728.78 



1,770.48 



$80,760,588.97 



Comparison 

With Total 

Revenue of 

Preceding 

Year 



"6,623 

*296 

9 

475 

*152 

91 
1 
4 



,329.32 
,241.86 
,158.62 
,920.15 
,547.35 
969.47 
,299.64 
.366.44 
,260.01 



$*7,632,103. 



♦62,100.49 

no, 628. 05 

*849. 17 

*979..59 

177.26 

838.96 

175,437.63 

*526.26 

7,174.24 

*9,417.33 

*51,263.86 

"101,275.57 

♦38,530.32 



"91.942.55 



$ *4,748.43 
27.72 



$ *4,720.71 
$*7, 728, 767.06 



^Denotes decrease. 



NOKFOLK AND AVESTERN 



207 



RAILWAY OPERATING REVEN UES-WIT H IN THE STATE 



Class of Operating Revenues 


Total Revenue 

For Year 

1920 


Total Revenue 

For Year 

1921 




1 983,430.71 

201,610.43 

1.995.22 

54,986.49 

27,104.28 

1,068.45 

17,508.16 

906.93 

563.17 


$ 836,455.56 




191,206.80 


Excess baggage 

Mail 


2,039.97 

38,762.12 




21,938.56 




4,394.29 




16,525.50 








402.98 






Total rail-line transportation revenue 


$ 1,289,173.84 


$ 1,111,725.78 




S 31.05 

1,276.43 

5,999.77 

78.37 

9,989.01 

169.51 

317.00 

100.00 




Station, train, and boat privileges 


$ 1,695.94 
6,129.94 


Storage— baggage 


83.42 
7,685.00 




*99.27 


Rents of buildings and other property 


*515.00 




7,004.18 






Total incidental operating revenue 


S 17,961.14 


$ 21,984.21 


Joint facility— Cr. . 


S 490.62 


$ 509.24 






Total joint facility operating revenue 

Total railway operating revenues 


$ 490.62 
% 1,307,625.60 


$ 509.24 
$ 1,134,219.23 



208 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES 



Name of Operating Expense Account 



, Maintenance of Way and Structures : 

Superintendence 

Roadway maintenance — yard 

Roadway maintenance — other 

Roadway depreciation — other 

Tunnels and subways — yard 

Tunnels and subways — other 

Bridges, trestles, and culverts — yard 

Bridges, trestles, and culverts— other 

Bridges, trestles, and culverts— deprecia- 

ciation — other 

Ties — yard 

Ties — other 

Rails — yard 

Rails — other 

Other track material— yard 

Other track material— other 

Ballast — yard 

Ballast — other 

Track laying and surfacing— yard 

Track laying and surfacing— other 

Right-of-way fences— yard 

Right-of-way fences— other 

Crossings and signs — yard 

Crossings and signs — other 

Station and office buildings 

Station and office buildings — depreciation 

Roadway buildings 

Water stations 

Water stations— depreciation 

Fuel stations.- 

Fuel stations— depreciation 

Shops and enginehouses 

Shops and enginehouses — depreciation 

Gr ai n elevators— depreciati on 

Storage warehouses 

Wharves and docks 

Wharves and docks — depreciation 

Coal and ore wharves 

Coal and ore wharves — depreciation 

Telegraph and telephone lines 

Signals and interlockers 

Power plant dams, canals, and pipe lines . 

Power plant buildings 

Power plant buildings — depreciation 

Power substation buildings 

Power transmission systems 

Power transmission systems — depreciation 

Power distribution systems 

Power distribution systems — depreciation . 

Power line poles and fixtures 

Power line poles and fixtures — depreciation 

Miscellaneous structures 

Paving 

Roadway machines 



Entire Line 



1920 



; 604,457.59 

431,874.47 

1,257,230.52 

401,257.92 

12,116.92 

56,188.47 

16,829.73 

367,589.30 



211, 
694, 

1,023, 
122, 
410, 
241, 
501, 
1, 
499, 
641, 

2,249, 

53, 
14, 
91, 

345, 

176, 
44, 

236, 
45, 
86, 
15, 

394, 



29. 

21, 
182. 

45. 
114, 
655. 



856.04 
044.60 
038.42 
783.14 
774.22 
383.27 
716.26 
884.82 
780.43 
531.73 
448.12 
602.01 
415.46 
257.43 
533.73 
834.48 
680.16 
225.67 
821.19 
639.96 
956.60 
964.08 
132.10 
236.04 
400.00 
268.42 
772.19 
319.92 
217.58 
999.96 
212.18 
466.22 



11,719.70 

13,418.40 

101.97 

1,623.45 

6,918.60 

60,367.24 

11,236.68 

22,781.11 

8,323.32 

5.05 

2,104.47 

100,780.51 



1921 



I 564,352.12 

331,480.17 

759,535.36 

401,257.92 

6,274.29 

70,126.95 

19,818.31 

389,379.42 

211,856.04 

881,199.89 

1,630,069.28 

142,056.03 

767,275.40 

219,225.64 

595,218.77 

881.81 

163,059.61 

562,342.37 

1,574,264.46 

86.92 

53,775.89 

12,197.87 

92,196.03 

212,271.78 

176,679.96 

6,955.52 

175,710.17 

45,639.96 

75,944.47 

15,964.08 

222,691.46 

96,236.04 

2,400.00 



33,649.80 

21,319.92 

119,897.46 

45,999.96 

122,900.72 

528,634.77 

25.49 

8,481.18 

13,418.40 

358.45 

9,684.59 

6,918.60 

48,654.57 

11,274.38 

22,401.65 

8,323.32 



1,475.94 
100,417.48 



Within the State 
1920 1921 



$ 15,939.40 
3,676.79 
40,327.72 
15,253.64 



674.43 

23.56 

17,710.19 

4,631.87 
25,868.04 
38,079.40 

4,631.14 
17,688.74 

7,284.52 
16,088.36 



8,574.45 

1,940.96 

60,005.01 



1,472.28 



5,671.72 

10,455.98 

2,854.80 

970.25 

3,272.98 

89.04 

2,574.04 

67.20 

5,344.57 



2,351.89 
7,865.09 



.56 



1.74 
113.98 
112.88 



3,029.54 



$ 14,151.86 

1,616.84 

30,962.75 

15,253.65 



629.40 



16,193.84 

4,631.87 
27,044.70 
56,677.97 

6,121.19 
32,232.45 

5,408.45 
18,084.39 

5,426.73 



809.78 
49,817.81 



1,411.27 



6,470.98 
8,366.36 
2,854.80 

168.08 

2,218.11 

89.04 

2,187.40 

167.90 
1,896.17 



4,788.44 
6,084.72 



24.61 



36.25 
42.44 
68.29 



2,987.44 



NORFOLK AND WESTERN 



209 



RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES— Conhnued 



Name of Operating Expense Account 



Entire Line 



1920 



1921 



Within the Statt 



1920 



L*21 



L Maintenance of Way and Structures 
— Continued 

Small tools and supphes 

Removing snow, ice, and sand 

Assessments for public improvements 

Injuries to persons 

Insurance 

Stationery and printing 

Other expenses 



238,719.55 
28,787.99 
1,152.56 
25,152.61 
55,880.65 
11.018.64 
222.03 



196,722.08 

26,296.89 

4,604.21 

78,776.25 

72,455.48 

7,594.91 

*837.34 



% 6,678.39 
363.02 

660.09 

569.69 

259.37 

14.00 



4,976.65 

700.38 

1,345.96 

3,381.47 

678.72 

164.00 

15.89 



Total 

Maintaining joint tracks, yards, and other-. 

facilities — Dr 

Maintaining joint tracks, yards, and other 

facilities — Cr 



$13,000,055.88 
62,848.99 
251,377.40 



$11,967,880.15 
84,762.69 
273,660.23 



$ 333,238.23 

521.57 

10,060.66 



% 336,189.05 

952.82 

10,885.36 



Total maintenance of way and structures 

II. Maintenance of Equipment: 

Superintendence 

Shop machinery 

Shop machinery — depreciation 

Power plant machinery '. 

Power plant machinery — depreciation 

Power substation apparatus 

Steam locomotives — repairs 

Steam locomotives — depreciation 

Steam locomotives — retirements 

Other locomotives— repairs 

Other locomotives — depreciation 

Other locomotives — retirements 

Freight-train cars — repairs 

Freight-train cars — depreciation 

Freight-train cars — retirements 

Passenger-train cars — repairs 

Passenger-train cars — depreciation 

Passenger-train cars— retirements 

Floating equipment — repairs 

Floating equipment — depreciation 

Work equipment — repairs 

Work equipment — depreciation 

Work equipment — retirements 

Miscellaneous equipment — repairs 

Miscellaneous equipment — depreciation ,.. 

Injuries to persons 

Insurance 



$12,811,527.47 



$11,778,982.61 



$ 323,699.14 



,256.51 



542,950.01 
524,459.95 
137,056.15 
161,592.08 

23,319.98 

2,194.17 

,912,560.20 

944,280.76 

85,320.25 
708,300.04 

28,800.00 



Stationery and printing. 
Other expenses 



,413,014.53 

,676,378.20 

8,187.93 

975.449.75 

129,702.89 

2,497.22 

21,312.29 

943.30 

288,203.83 

54,691.45 

3,124.33 

14,175.62 

1,593.24 

37,090.87 

60,517.59 

65,397.16 

375.79 



I 489, 

232 

158 

128 

23 

7. 

6,432 

915 

456 

32 

3 

7,240 

1,698 

388 

634 

128 

1 

5 

90 

54 

5 

7 

1 

43 

76 

45 



,566.87 
,608.75 
,088.53 
,641.67 
,445.25 
,920.84 
,471.42 
,559.68 

812.87 
,230.10 
,252.29 
,854.88 
,224.84 
,537.74 
,372.68 
,942.03 
,418.87 
,185.07 
,942.93 

750.51 
,716.55 
,857.04 
,734.70 
,740.-52 
,593.24 
,424.22 
,742.27 
,982.92 

915.18 



9,798.33 
9,374.00 
2,521.55 
1,624.28 



8,149.23 
3,858.16 
2,727.26 
1,017.14 



319,222.96 

27,767.89 

1,973.43 



171,568.45 

24,463.44 

23.08 



213,730.80 

20,008.29 

338.39 

37,077.90 

4,900.92 

89.39 



115,666.44 

27,099.19 

6,386.41 

24,131.13 

4, 829.. 30 

45.90 



5,366.02 

999.90 

54.23 

259.65 

29.13 

299.54 

664.07 

1,007.12 

24.21 



1,470.38 
930.03 
251.45 
128.96 

26.88 
380.55 
814.59 
757.45 

15.73 



Total 

Maintaining joint equipment at terminals 
Dr 

Maintaining joint equipment at terminals 
Cr 



129,652,849.08 
62,054.98 
11,045,09 



Total maintenance of equipment. 



$29,703,858.97 



$19,307,534.46 

38,389.63 

3,387.83 



$ 662,185.22 
1,469.95 



% 394.741.15 



282.31 



$19,342,536.26 



1,715.27 



$ 394,458.84 



210 



N. C. .CORPORATION COMMISSION 



RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES— Continued 



Name of Operating Expense Account 



III. Traffic: 

Superi ntendence 

Outside agencies 

Advertising 

Traffic associations 

Fast freight lines 

Industrial and immigration bureaus. 

I ns urance 

Stationery and printing 

Other expenses 



Total . 



IV. Transportation— Rail-line: 

Superintendence 

Dispatching trains 

Station employees 

Weighing, insp'ct'n, and demurrage bureaus 

Coal and ore wharves 

Station supplies and expenses 

Yardmasters and yard clerks 

Yard conductors and brakemen 

Yard switch and signal tenders 

Yard enginemen 

Fuel for yard locomotives 

Water for yard locomotives 

Lubricants for yard locomotives 

Other supplies for yard locomotives 

Enginehouse expenses — yard 

Yard supplies and expenses 

Train enginemen 

Train motormen 

Fuel for train locomotives 

Train power produced 

Water for train locomotives 

Lubricants for train locomotives 

Other supplies for train locomotives 

Enginehouse expenses — train 

Trainmen 

Train supplies and expenses 

Operating sleeping cars 

Signal and interlocker operation 

Crossing protecti on 

Drawbridge operation 

Telegraph and telephone operation 

Operating floating equipment 

Stationery and printing 

Other expenses 

Insurance 

Clearing wrecks 

Damage to property 

Damage to live stock on right of way 

Loss and damage — freight 

Loss and damage — baggage 

Injuries to persons 



Total 



Entire Line 
1920 



266,340.38 

270,630.47 

21,686.38 

38,013.37 

1,871.48 

13,294.98 

71.02 

159,380.25 

21.75 



$ 771,310. 



653, 

4,160 

66 

238 

200 

947 

2,050 

194 

956 

1,407 

50 

2 

31 

646 

96 

4,130 

128 

10,745 

494 

532 

214 

189 

2,157 

3,686 

1,380 



,154.30 
,895.45 
,788.75 
,084.05 
,456.67 
,314.93 
,922.88 
,235.96 
,087.19 
,603.90 
,862.55 
,155.82 
,388.64 
,849.70 
,807.01 
,723.76 
,434.20 
,308.54 
,137.29 
,500.35 
,078.03 
,409.66 
,271.18 
,558.79 
,948.95 
,331.22 



426,726.92 
206,478.07 

14,551.26 

77,850.04 

1.511.32 

195,962.23 

106,945.14 

49,542.50 
611,089.85 
128,242.72 

51,742.09 

925,522.20 

2,962.94; 

668,949.29 



1921 



259,963.50 

385,476.41 

20,904.35 

17,438.50 

371.25 

13,456.08 



145,433.00 



$ 843,043.09 



I 771 

589, 

3,607, 

49, 

171 

184 

811 

1,424 

171 

■ 689 

924 

41 

*3 

17 

499 

88 

2,982 

97, 

7,770 

373 

438 

255 

136 

1,858 

2,835 

980 

400 

202 

11 

83 

1 

163 
44 
37, 

346. 

118 
49, 

557, 
4, 

244, 



,971.41 
,004.17 
,078.16 
,698.31 
,759.88 
,361.01 
.980.18 
,924.32 
,927.30 
.845.85 
,376.85 
,340.53 
,065.28 
,516.48 
,075.25 
,747.68 
,491.66 
,062.76 
,814.39 
,986.23 
,630.06 
,010.33 
,688.32 
,958.94 
,420.60 
,248.94 

*35.10 
,807.88 
,197.93 
,579.75 
,059.16 
,001.83 
,379.01 
,133.81 
,278.92 
,815.04 
,887.60 
.400.48 
.562.64 
,074.47 

897.07 



.-__ $39,670,386.34 $30,034,894.82 $ 1,185,846.79 



Within the State 
1920 1921 



4,963.62 

5,084.42 

441.94 

2,690.44 



248.31 
1.37 

2,994.50 

.42 



5,425.02 



15,001.41 

14,609.09 

171,655.55 

2,667.67 

.14 

7,987.93 

17,161.44 

27,346.87 

231.38 

17,446.87 

34,062.41 

774.23 

51.54 

271.09 

10,615.31 

841.64 

148,873.68 



352,629.37 



13,112.25 
7,571.78 
5,114.37 

71,029.21 
121,410.75 

33,197.35 



10,409.23 
5.040.32 



1,570.92 



6,348.59 

667.82 

524.20 

12,810.48 

2,899.23 

1,317.96 

45,225.31 

129.66 

25,239.74 



4,366.04 

6,525.06 

365.29 

516.02 

7.16 

227.34 



2,415.21 



14,422.12 

12,652.75 

12,951.13 

153,373.89 

2,157.43 



8,333.98 

15.383.44 

22.204.99 

92.40 

14.027.57 

19,316.50 

572.41 

*31.09 

119.93 

8,477.87 

745.79 

105,599.61 



234,436.13 



11.566.25 

7.693.80 

3,711.92 

62,131.51 

92,291.67 

22,614.43 

*.68 

12,022.02 

5,498.71 



1,655.39 



5,427.74 

41.19 

577.51 

6,455.44 

9,348.03 

1.048.11 

21,761.25 

85.03 

*5,479.68 



!79.813.73 



NOKFOLK AND WESTERN 



211 



RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES— Conhnapri 



Name of Operating Expense Account 


Entire Line 


Within the State 


1920 


1921 


1920 


1921 


IV. Transportation— Rail-line— 
Continued 
Operating joint yards and terminals— Dr. _ 
Operating joint yards and terminals— Cr. _ 
Operating joint tracks and facilities— Dr.. 
Operating joint tracks and facilities— Cr. . 


% 680,602.38 

789,009.04 

40,095.27 

73,985.78 


$ 496,426.67 

479,475.90 

43,860.96 

77,547.76 


$ 43,281.70 
75,416.78 


$ 5,001.47 
49,578.50 


26.89 


287.58 


Total transportation— rail line 


$39,528,089.17 


$30,018,158.79 


$1,153,684.82 


% 834,949.12 


V. Miscellaneous Operations: 


% 274,429.01 
50,295.48 
14,561.04 
40,280.67 
80,317.18 
349.80 


$ 232,574.80 
43,400.30 
11,016.34 
11,106.60 
31,813.74 
380.40 


$ 6,031.79 


$ 4,426.81 












Stockyards 

Producing power sold 

Other miscellaneous operations 


143.18 
195.22 


9.50 

231.63 

7.39 








Total miscellaneous operations 


$ 460,233.18 


$ 330,292.18 


$ 6,370.19 


$ 4,675.33 


VI. General: 
Salaries- and expenses of general officers - - 
Salaries and expenses of clerks and attend- 


$ 259,283.14 

959,530.40 
50,052.58 

204,166.00 
931.23 

100,342.98 

113,947.37 
79,698.91 

112,173.14 
57,433.98 


$ 202,687.16 

900,898.41 
44,682.26 

202,108.99 

996.74 

97,342.04 

182,769.86 
63,621.66 
70,047.91 
70,293.37 


$ 4,919.57 

18,216.43 

951.38 

4,805.57 

10.94 

1,885.97 

2,126.32 

1,511.83 

2,143.57 

994.56 


$ 3,441.39 
15,474.49 


General office supplies and expenses 

Law expenses 

Insurance 


757.52 

5,966.09 

8.56 


Relief department expenses 

Pensions 


1,688.45 
3,109.16 


Stationery and printing 


1,065.26 


Valuation expenses 


1,172.03 


Other expenses 


1,239.04 






Total 


$1,937,559.73 


$1,835,448.40 


$ 37,566.14 


% 33,921.99 








$ 2,040.16 
1,176.00 


$ 1,999.77 
462.00 


$ 47.31 
20.22 


$ 65.19 


General joint facilities — Cr 










$1,938,423.89 


$1,836,986.17 


$ 37,593.23 


$ 33,987.18 






VII. Transportation for investment — Cr 


$ 226.732.29 


$ 143,827.63 


$ 1,104.32 


$ 821.74 


Grand total railway operating expenses 


$84,986,710.47 


$64,006,171.47 


$2,197,383.35 


$1,607,927.36 


Operating ratio (ratio of operating ex- 
penses to operating revenues) 


96.04% 


79.25% 


168.04% 


141.77% 







EMPLOYEES AND THEIR COMPENSATION 





1920 


1921 


Number of employees 


32,129 
$54,346,740.56 


23,422 


Compensation 


$35,488,498.00 







212 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



RAILWAY FREIGHT CARR lED— ENTIRE LINE 



Commodity 


1920 


1921 


Carloads 


Tons 


Carloads 


Tons 


Products of Agriculture: 
Wheat .. 


5,868 
3,747 
2,325 

829 
7,381 
6,549 
19,374 
7,220 
2,269 

648 

736 
4,840 
3,470 
2,089 

576 
5,063 


232,084 

126,037 

68,456 

28,863 

184,987 

166,977 

243,827 

82,176 

29,174 

13,368 

10,961 

70,683 

62,750 

29,633 

12,336 

78,893 


3,500 
3,737 
1,806 

494 
7,961 
6,100 
15,600 
6,815 
2,197 
1,458 

924 
3,464 
3,350 
2,464 

320 
5,190 


130,375 




122,504 


Oats 


47,828 
13,791 




159,807 




127,852 




194,843 


Tobacco 

Cotton 

Cotton seed and products, except oil 


74,255 
29,342 
27,090 
13,412 




47,444 


Potatoes 


59,615 
31,256 


Dried fruits and vegetables 

Other products of agriculture 


6,412 

78,599 


Total 


72,984 


1,441,205 


65,380 


1.164,425 






Animals and Products: 

Horses and mules 

Cattle and calves 

Sheep and goats 


1,161 
5,240 

901 

1,289 

2,472 

1,071 

58 

321 

262 

48 

1,603 

521 


12,976 

58,509 

8,543 

11,987 

34,078 

14,610 

544 

3,433 

4,372 

591 

35,418 

13,036 


574 

5,257 

883 

1,197 

3,128 

418 

54 

284 

243 

155 

933 

519 


6.035 

59,206 

8,189 


Hogs 

Fresh meats 

Other packing-house products 

Poultry 

Eggs 


10,762 
44,078 

5,849 
663 

3,026 


Butter and cheese 


2,910 


Wool 

Hides and leather 


1.784 
19,930 


Other animals and products 


12,397 






Total 


14,947 


198,097 


13,645 


174,829 


Products of Mines: 


444 

464,491 

37,115 

26,791 

1,332 

70 

34,104 

60 

844 

1,753 

2,543 


21,227 

26,035,500 

1,378,739 

1,381,621 

66, 103 

3,042 

1,785,387 

2,022 

26,023 

52,377 

92.185 


277 

394,891 

8,492 

2,431 

488 

3 

22,598 

26 

827 

1,444 

1,177 


12,216 


Bituminous coal 

Coke 


21,766,196 
320,514 




149,737 




18,563 




151 




1,176,152 




867 




25,939 


Salt 


34,621 
42,485 






Total 


' 569,547 


30,844,226 


432,054 


23,547,441 



NORFOLK AND WESTERN 



213 



RAILWAY FREIGHT CARRIED— ENTIRE UNE— Continued 



Commodity 


1920 


1921 


Carloads 


Tons 


Carloads 


Tons 


Products of Forests: 
Logs, posts, poles, and cordwood 


16,164 
4,733 
3,920 

56,334 
5,634 


443,043 
140,466 
114,451 

1,474,496 
94,694 


10,626 
3,881 
1,599 

36,021 
2,578 


313,131 


Ties 


118,003 


Pulp wood 


46,547 


Lumber, timber, box shocks, staves, and 
headings 


914,336 


Other products of forests 


49,240 






Total 


86,785 


2,267,150 


54,705 


1,441,257 






Manufactures and Miscellaneous: 
Refined petroleum and its products 


7,127 
298 
2,572 
14 
15,793 
2,643 

16,342 
1,867 
6,120 
7,448 
9,192 
7,162 
1,283 

4,163 
11,773 
3,181 
2,231 

976 
973 
7,847 
1,668 
12,285 
2,020 
2,348 
57,416 


179,433 

8,460 

63,101 

283 

703,324 

110,071 

522,783 
65,407 
113,804 
286,082 
344,884 
210,477 
31,458 

66,022 
72.811 
25,663 
19,562 
19,887 
16,372 

213,214 
38,127 

397,536 

22,141 

52,108 

1,482,024 


7,033 
96 

2,001 
19 

2,828 

1,710 

7,331 
890 
3,086 
6,821 
7,352 
5,780 
1,134 

1,986 

10,030 

1,641 

1,871 

676 

1,011 

6,640 

792 

6,734 

1,241 

1,794 

29,210 


180,208 
2,204 


Sugar, sirup, glucose, and molasses 

Boats and vessel supplies 


46,362 

209 

131,425 




71.444 


Bar and sheet iron, structural iron, and 
iron pipe 

Other metals, pig, bar, and sheet 

Castings, machinery, and boilers 


206,570 
29.679 
55,668 


Cement 

Brick and artificial stone 


241,679 
260,097 


Lime and plaster 


138,693 


Sewer pipe and drain tile 


19,994 


Agricultural implements and vehicles 
other than automobiles ... 


43.091 


Automobiles and autotrucks 


56.691 


Household goods andsec'nd hand furniture 

Furniture (new) 

Beverages _ 


13,596 
14,490 
13,784 


Ice 


16,608 


Fertilizers (all kinds) 


152,920 


Paper, printed matter, and books 


18,605 
201,208 


Textiles 

Canned goods (all canned food products) 
Other manufactures and miscellaneous, .. 


12,958 
37.099 
698,762 


Total 


184,742 


5,065,034 


109,707 


2,664,044 


Grand total, carload traffic 


929,005 


39,815,712 
870,031 


676,091 


28,991.996 


Merchandise— all L. C. L. freight 


692,939 










Grand total, carload and L.C.L.traflac 


929,005 


40,685,743 


676,091 


29,684,935 



214 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— ENTIRE LINE 



Item 


Amount 1920 


Amount 1921 


Average mileage of road operated miles 

Train-miles: 

Freight — ordinary.. . 


2,200.33 

9,612,336 
172,847 


2,225.94 
8,054,888 


Freight— light 


105,724 






Freight— total... . 


9,785,183 


8,160,612 








4,735,163 

206,381 

6,366 


4,696,087 


Mixed 


210,195 


Special 


5,400 






Total transportation service 


14,733,093 


13,072,294 






Work service ._. . _ 


394,234 


226,847 






Locomotive-miles : 
Freight— principal . ._ 


9,875,183 

2,708,775 

543,500 


8,160,612 


Freight— helper _ . . 


1,776,955 


Freight— Hght 


368,859 






Freight— total .. _. 


13,037,458 


10,306,426 






Passenger — principal . 


4,735,163 
128,777 
125,637 


4,696,087 


Passenger — helper . . 


93,165 


Passenger — light 


108,538 






Passenger — total . 


4,989,577 


4,897,790 






Mixed train — principal . 


206,381 

1,191 

10,382 


210,195 


Mixed train — helper. ... 


23 


Mixed train — light., . 


16,169 






Mixed train— total 


217,954 


226,387 






Special— principal . 


6,366 
867 
326 


5,400 


Special— helper 


602 










Special— total 


7,559 


6,002 






Train switching. ._ _. . 


443,738 


359,056 






Yard switching— freight . 


3,452,700 
230,761 


2,432,808 


Yard switching— passenger.. ... 


215.311 






Yard switching— total.. . 


3,683,461 


2,648,119 






Total transportation service ... 


22,379,747 


18,443,780 






Work service 


395,932 


227,458 






Car-miles: 
Freight train — loaded 


276,726,120 
163,906,679 


220,615,144 


Freight train — empty. .. 


158,084,477 






Sum of loaded and empty . 


440,532.799 


378,699,621 







NORFOLK AND WESTERN 
RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— ENTIRE LINE— Continued 



21i 



Item 


Amount 1920 


Amount 1921 


Cab.-mil,es— Continued. ■ 
Freight train — caboose 


9,738,300 


8,124,680 


Freight train — exclusive work equipment 


488,774 








Freight train — total 


450,271,099 


387,313,075 






Passenger train — passenger 


13,371,763 
6,084,643 
1,091,279 

10,773,173 


12,895,854 


Passenger train — sleeping, parlor, and observation 


5 839 722 


Passenger train — dining 


1 000 842 


Passenger train — other 


10 175 390 








31,320,858 


29,911,808 






Mixed train — freight — loaded 


470,404 
135,061 


456 998 


Mixed train — freight — empty 


157 905 




2,997 




345,461 
106,952 


358,213 




159,796 








1,057,878 


1,135,909 








73,177 

66 

5,814 

12,159 
9,198 
1,973 


58 330 








5 098 


Special train — passenger 


3 836 


Special train— sleeping, parlor, and observation 

Special train— other passenger-train . ... 


16,335 






Special train— total 


102,387 


83 599 






Total transportation service 


482,752,222 


418,444,391 




Work service 


1,654,460 


516,791 




Freight Service: 
Tons — revenue freight 


40,685,743 
4,111,499 


29 684 935 


Tons— nonrevenue freight 


3,415,332 


Tons— total 


44,797,242 


33,100,267 




Ton-miles— revenue freight 

Ton-miles— nonrevenue freight 


11,063,033,480 
596,802,543 


8,382,095,487 
494,911,176 


Ton-miles — total 


11,659,836,023 


8,877,006,663 


V 


Passenger Service: 
Passengers carried — revenue 


7,376,109 
346,264,412 


6,514,948 
292,222,528 


Passenger-miles— revenue .. 




Revenues and Expenses: 
Freight revenue 


1 73,918,301.04 
10,374,128.93 
12,938,090.93 


1 67,294,971.72 
10,077,887.07 
12 023 509 66 


Passenger revenue 


Passenger service train revenue 






Operating revenues . . 


1 88,489,356.03 
84,986,710.47 


$ 80 760 588 97 


Operating expenses 


64,006,171.47 




Net operating revenues 


1 3,502,645.56 


1 16 754 417 50 







216 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS-ENTIRE UtiE~Co7itinued 



Item 



Averages per Mile of Road: 

Freight-train miles 

Passenger-train miles 

Mixed train miles 

Special-train miles 

Transportation service train-miles 

Work-train miles 

Locomotive-miles — transportation 

Freight service car-miles 

Passenger service car-miles 

Freight revenue 

Passenger service train revenue 

Operating revenues 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenues 

Ton-miles — revenue freight 

Ton-miles' — all freight 

Passenger- miles — revenue 



Amount 1920 



Amount 1921 



Averages per Train-mile: 

Loaded freight car-miles— freight trains 

Loaded freight car-miles — mixed trains 

Empty freight car-miles— freight trains 

Empty freight car-miles— mixed trains 

Ton- miles— revenue freight 

Ton-miles— all freight 

Passenger train car-miles — passenger trains . 

Passenger train car-miles — mixed trains 

Revenue passenger-miles 

Freight revenue 

Passenger service train revenue 

Operating revenues 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenues 



Averages per Locomotive-mile: 

Train-miles — freight trains 

Car-miles — freight trains 

Train-miles — passenger trains - . 

Car-miles — passenger trains 

Train-miles — mixed trains 

Car-miles — mixed trains 

Train-miles — special trains. .' 

Car-miles — special trains 



Averages per Loaded Freight Car-mile: 

Ton-miles— revenue freight 

Ton-miles — all freight 

Freight revenue 



Averages per Car-mile — Passenger: 

Passenger-miles — revenue 

Passenger revenue 



4,447 

2,152 

94 



179 

10,171 

204,949 

14,451 

33,594.19 

5,880.07 

40,216.40 

38,624.53 

1,591.87 

5,027,897 

5,299,131 

157,369 



28.28 

2.28 

16.74 

.65 

1,107.24 

1,166.97 

6.61 

2.19 

70.07 

7.40 

2.62 

6.01 

5.77 

.24 



.75 
34.54 

.95 
66.28 

.95 
4.85 

.84 
13.55 



39.91 

42.06 

26,666.00 



17.49 
52,390.00 



NOKFOLK AND WESTERN 
RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— ENTIRE LINE— Continued 



217 



Item 



Amount 1920 



Amount 1921 



Miscellaneous Averages: 

Miles hauled — revenue freight 

Miles hauled^nonrevenue freight 

Miles hauled — all freight 

Miles carried — revenue passengers 

Revenue per ton of freight 

Revenue per ton-mile of freight. . 

Revenue per passenger 

Revenue per passenger-mile 

Operating ratio 



271.91 


282.37 


145.15 


144.91 


260.28 


268.19 


46.94 


44.85 


1.81681 


$ 2.26697 


.00668 


.00803 


1.40645 


1.54689 


.02996 


.03449 


96.04 


% 79.25 



218 X. C. COKPORATION 

STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATl 



COMMISSION 

ONS— WITHIN THE STATE 



Item 


Amount 1920 


Amount 1921 


Average mileage of road operated miles 

Train-miles: 


131.17 

298,161 
3,164 


131.17 
262 017 


Freight— light .. .. . _ _ . 


1,280 






Freight— total 


301,325 


263 297 








205,983 

30,545 

262 


206,017 


Mixed 


30,727 




211 








538,115 


500,252 








8,422 


3,578 






Locomotive-miles: 

Freight— principal 

Freight— helper 

Freight— hght 


301,325 

186,371 

12,351 


263,297 

117,673 

7,861 


Freight— total .- . . . . . . . 


500,047 


388,831 






Passenger- — principal 


205,983 
3,135 

2,258 


206,017 


Passenger — helper 


1,042 


Passenger — light 


1,343 








211,376 


208,402 






Mixed train— principal 

Mixed train— helper 

Mixed train— light 


30,545 

118 

2 


30,727 
9 
5 


Mixed train— total 


30,665 


30,741 




262 
55 
39 


164 




84 


Special — light 








Special — total 


356 


248 






Train switching 


24,368 


20,484 








47,233 
3,158 


47,082 




4,571 








50,391 


51,653 








817,203 


700,359 








8,558 


3,601 






Car-miles: 


5,147,567 
1,924,764 


3,810,591 


Freight train— empty 


1,694,128 


Sum of loaded and empty 

Freight train— caboose 

Freight train — exclusive work equipment 


7,072,331 
300,903 


5,504,719 

263,231 

26.050 








■ Freight train— total . a 


7,373,234 


5.794,000 



NOKFOLK AND WESTERN 
STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— WITH IN THE STATE— Continued 



210 



Item 


Amount 1920 


Amount 1921 


Car-miles— Continued; 
Passenger train — passenger 


584,203 
33,941 


576,076 


Passenger train — sleeping, parlor and observation 


33,736 


Passenger train — dining 


40 


Passenger train — other 


349,460 


338,200 






Passenger train — total 


967,604 


948,052 






Mixed train — freight — loaded 


58,251 
5,096 


71,088 


Mixed train — freight — empty 


4,015 


Mixed train — exclusive work equipment 


47 


Mixed train — passenger 


65,963 
29,953 


62,968 


Mixed train — other passenger train 


43,708 






Mixed train— total 


159,263 


181,826 


Special train— freight— loaded 

Special train — freight — empty 


2,720 

7 

222 

665 

199 


1,653 


Special train- — caboose 


235 


Special train— passenger 

Special train— sleeping, parlor, and observation 


101 
169 


Special train— total 


3,813 


2,158 




8,503,914 


6,926,036 






Work service 


28,958 


10,432 


Freight Service: 

Tons— revenue freight 

Tons— nonrevenue freight 


2,223,924 
45,968 


1,436,133 
51,407 


Tons— total 


2,269,892 


1,487,540 






Ton-mil^s— revenue freight 

Ton-miles— nonrevenue freight 


101,494,753 
1,651,395 


72,821,509 
1,808,568 


Ton-miles— total 


103,146,148 


74,630,077 


Passenger Service: 

Passengers carried — revenue 


311,608 
6,882,131 


250,842 


Passenger-miles— revenue 


5,638,450 


Revenues and Expenses 
Freight revenue 


$ 983,430.71 
201,610.43 
286,764.87 


1 836,455.56 
191,206.80 




258,341.74 






Operating revenues 

Operating expenses 


$ 1,307,625.60 
2,197,383.35 


% 1,134,219.23 
1 607 927 36 






Net operating revenues 


$ *889,757.75 


$ *473,708.13 


Averages per Mile of Road: 
Freight-train miles 


2,297 

1,570 

233 

2 


2 007 


Passenger-train miles 


1 571 


Mixed-train miles 


234 


Special-train miles 


2 







'Deficit 



220 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— WITHIN THE STATE— Conhnwed 



Item 



Averages per Mile of Road — Continued: 

Transportation service train- miles 

Work-train miles 

Locomotive-miles — transportation 

Freight service car-miles 

Passenger service car-miles 

Freight revenue 

Passenger service train revenue 

Operating revenues 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenues 

Ton- miles — revenue freight 

Ton-miles— all freight 

Passenger- miles — revenue 

Averages per Train-mile: 

Loaded freight car-miles — freight trains 

Loaded freight car-miles — mixed trains 

Empty freight car-miles — freight trains 

Empty freight car-miles — mixed trains 

Ton-miles — revenue freight 

Ton-miles — all freight 

Passenger train car-miles — passenger trains 

Passenger train car-miles — mixed trains 

Revenue passenger-miles 

Freight revenue 

Passenger service tr ai n revenue 

Operating revenues 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenues 

Averages per Locomotive-mile: 

Train-miles — freight trains 

Car-miles — freight trains 

Train-miles — passenger trains 

Car- miles — passenger trains 

Train-miles — mixed trains 

Car-miles — mixed trains 

Train-miles — special trains 

Car-miles — special trains 

Averages per Loaded Freight Car-mile: 

Ton-miles — revenue freight 

Ton-miles — all freight 

Freight revenue 

Averages per Car-mile— Passenger : 

Passenger-miles — revenue 

Passenger revenue. : 

Miscellaneous Averages: 

Miles hauled — revenue freight 

Miles hauled — nonrevenue freight 

Miles hauled — all freight 

Miles carried — revenue passengers 

Revenue per ton of freight 

Revenue per ton-mile of freight 

Revenue per passenger 

Revenue per passenger-mile _ 

Operati ng ratio 



Amount 1920 



% 



4,102 

64 

6,230 

56,717 

8,115 

7,497.38 

2,186.21 

9,968.94 

16,752.18 

*6,783.24 

773,765 

786,355 

52,467 



17.08 

1.91 

6.39 

.17 

305.83 

310.80 

4.70 

3.14 

29.10 

2.96 

1.21 

2.43 

4.08 

*1.65 



14.75 

.97 

4.58 

1.00 

5.19 

.74 

10.71 

19.50 

19.81 

18,891.00 

10.06 
29,471.00 



45.64 
35.92 
45.44 
22.09 
.44221 
.00969 
. 64700 
.02929 
168.04 



Amount 1921 



^Deficit 



NORFOLK AND WESTERN 



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222 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 







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NOEFOLK AND WESTERN 223 

EQUIPMENT OWNED OR LEASED IN SERVICE OF COMP ^NY-Con(inued 





Available for Service Close of Year 
1920 


Available for Service Close of Year 
1921 


Class of Equipment. 


Number 
Fully 
Owned 


No. Held 

under 

Equipment 

Trust 


Total 
Number 


Number 
Fully 
Owned 


No. Held 

under 

Equipment 

Trust 


Total 
Number 


Company Service 

Equipment: 
Officers' and pay cars 


9 

237 

21 

11 

22 
928 










9 

237 

21 

11 

22 

928 


8 

231 

21 

11 

25 

911 










8 
231 




21 


Steam shovels 


11 


Wrecking cars (tool) 

Other company service cars 


25 
911 


All classes of company ser- 
vice cars 


1.228 





1,228 


1,207 





1,207 






Floating Equipment: 
Barges, car floats, and 
canal boats 


10 





10 


9 





9 


Total floating equipment 


10 





10 


9 





9 



TAXES ON RAILWAY PROPERTY 



Name of State 


Amount Paid 
in Year 1920 


Amount Paid 
in Year 1921 


Virginia 


$ 1,718,710.83 

846,479.01 

16,535.50 

44,171.78 

378,838.98 

5, 500. CO 


$ 1,817,006.68 


West Virginia 


942,798.48 


Maryland 


15,710.59 


North Carolina 


65,868.50 


Ohio 


716,546.87 


Kentucky 


14,628.94 


Georgia 


533 


Missouri 




387 








Total 


$ 3,010,236.10 


$ 3,572,569.32 






U. S. Government Taxes: 

U. S. Income Tax 1 

Capital Stock 


$ 1,247,920.90 
141,843.00 


$ 1,027,482.68 
129,948.00 






Total 


$ 1,389,763.90 


$ 1 157 430 68 






Grand total 


$ 4,400,000.00 


$ 4 730 000 00 







224 



N. C. CORPOKATION COMMISSION 



Piedmont and Northern Railroad Company 

HISTORY 

Organized under laws of State of South Carolina, Act 214, Volume 27, Statute of 1913, amendment 
authorizing increase of capital stock from 15,000,000 to $15,000,000 granted by Secretary of State, Jan- 
uary 28, 1914. 

Consolidation: Greenville, Spartanburg and Anderson Railway Company, chartered under 
chapter L of the Code of Laws of South CaroHna 1902, March 10, 1910, amendment May 9, 1911, and 
February 20, 1914. 

Piedmont Traction Company, chartered under laws of North Carohna Revisal of 1905— amended 
February 9, 1914. 

The properties of the above companies were purchased by the Piedmont and Northern Railway 
Company, in accordance with a resolution by the stockholders of the Piedmont Traction Company, 
April 25, 1914, and of the G. S. & A. Railway Company, April 24, 1914, and the Piedmont and Northern 
Railway Company, May 18, 1914. 

The purchase and consolidation of the above two companies into the Piedmont and Northern Rail- 
way Company, was effected pursuant to the authority contained' in the charter of the Piedmont and 
Northern Railway Company. 

PRINCIPAL GENERAL OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President 


W. S. Lee 

J. B. Duke 

N. A. Cocke 


Charlotte, N C 


Vice-President 

Vice-President and Treasurer 


New York, N. Y. 
Charlotte, N. C 


Vice-President and General Manager 

Secretary 


E. Thomason 

J. C. McGowan 

W. S. O'B. Robinson 

J. M. Martin 


Charlotte, N. C. 
Charlotte, N. C. 


General Solicitor 

Auditor 


Charlotte, N. C. 
Charlotte, N. C. 


Superintendent of Motive Power 


A. D. Frye 


Greenville, S. C. 



DIRECTORS 



J. B. Duke, New York, N. Y.; Pierpont V. Doris, New York, N. Y.; W. S. Lee, Charlotte, N. C; 
E. Thomason, Charlotte, N. C; S. W. Cramer, Charlotte, N. C; A. J. Draper, Charlotte, N. C; 
W. S. Montgomery, Spartanburg, S. C; V. M. Montgomery, Spartanburg, S. C; A. W. Smith, 
Greenville, S. C; John A. Law, Spartanburg, S. C; C. E. Hutchison, Mount Holly, N. C; E. A. 
Smythe, Greenville, S. C; W. E. Beattie, Greenville, S. C; B. B. Gossett, Anderson, S. C; J. R. 
Vandiver, Anderson, S.C.; J. T. Woodside, Greenville, S. C; J. P. Gossett, WiUiamston, S. C; L. D. 
Blake, Belton, S. C; J. C. Self, Greenwood, S. C; J. D. Hammett, Anderson, S. C; J. W. Arrington, 
Greenville, S. C; A. F. McKissick, Greenville, S. C; B. E. Geer, Greenville, S. C; J. H. Separk, 
Gastonia, N. C, C. C. Armstrong, Gastonia, N. C. 



PIEDMONT AND NORTHERN 



225 



COMPARATIVE GENERAL BALANCE SHEET— ASSET SIDE 



Balance at 

Beginning of 

Year 1920 


Item 


Balance at 

Beginning of 

Year 1921 


Balance at 

Close of Year 

1921 


$ 15,589,648.25 
7,476.90 

11,500.00 


Investments: 
Investment in road and equipment 


$ 15, 3i7, 167.86 
2,874.37 

11,500.00 
14,582.25 


$ 15 516 072 26 


Deposits in lieu of mortgaged property sold 
Other investments: 
Stocks -- ------ 


553.60 
11,500.00 


14,582.25 


Notes -- - -- 










$ 15 623 207.40 


$ 15,376,124.48 


$ 15,528,125.86 




Current Assets: 
Cash ---- 




$ 1,468.66 


1 400,862.42 

166,277.52 

5,000.00 

101,709.00 

330,592.51 

6,174.48 

25.00 


$ 297,098.96 


160,349.70 




168,855.02 


5,000.00 




5,741.71 


30 285.80 




85,974.53 


4,999.56 


Material and suppHes 

Interest and dividends receivable 


292,525.90 
1,350.00 




Other current assets 


25.00 




Total current assets 

Deferred Assets: 

U. S. Government deferred assets 

Other deferred assets 




$ 202M03.72 


$ 1,010,640.93 


1 851,571.12 


$ 616,615.19 


1 1,331,500.67 
940.00 


$ 1,332,142.88 
13,773.15 




Total deferred assets 




1 616,615.19 


$ 1,332,440.67 


1 1,345,916.03 




Unadjusted Debits: 
Rents and insurance premiums paid 

in advance 

Discount on funded debt 




$ 1,422.37 
3,763.75 


$ 23,602.65 


$ 12,807.69 


689,578.67 


U. S. Government unadjusted debits 






165,432.26 


Other unadjusted debits 


220,476.47 


79 197.27 








$ 860,197.05 


$ 244,079.12 


$ 92 004 96 




Grand total 




S 17,302,123.36 


$ 17,963,285.20 


$ 17,817,617.97 



226 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



COMPARATIVE GENERAL BALANCE SHEET-LIABILITY SIDE 



Balance at 

Beginning of 

Year 1920 



Item 



Balance at 

Beginning of 

Year 1921 



Balance at 

Close of Year 

1921 



8,584,600.00 



$ 


8,584,600.00 


$ 


6,137,000.00 


% 


6,137,000.00 



463,873.03 
2,521.49 
4,942.81 

160,377.85 
2,965.00 

149,900.00 



784,580.18 



1,105,816.25 



1,105,816.25 



6,000.00 
3,116.98 

76,266.08 
347.77 

11,871.22 



97,602.05 



592,524.88 



$ 592,524.88 

$ 17,302,123.36 



Stock: 
Capital stock . 



$ 8,584,600.00 



Total stock 



Long-term Debt: 
Funded debt unmatured . 



Total long-term debt . 



Current Liabilities: 

Loans and bills payable 

Audited accounts and wages payable- 
Miscellaneous accounts payable 

Interest matured unpaid 

Dividends matured unpaid 

Funded debt matured unpaid 

Unmatured interest accrued 



Total current liabilities . 



Deferred Liabilities: 
Other deferred liabilities 

U. S. Government deferred liabilities. 

Total deferred liabilities 



Unadjusted Credits: 

Tax liability 

Operating reserves 

Accrued depreciation— road and equipment 

U. S. Government unadjusted credits 

Other unadjusted credits 



Total unadjusted credits. 



Corporate Surplus: 
Profit and loss balance- 



Total corporate surplus. 
Grand total 



$ 232,189.18 

293,488.10 
200,018.13 
166,277.52 



50,100.00 
6,947.04 



$ 1,310.83 

31,484.06 
94,704.56 



25,097.39 



152,596.84 



653,987.46 



653,987. 



!, 584, 600. 00 



$ 


8,584,600.00 


$ 


8,584,600.00 


$ 


6,232,800.00 


$ 


6,241,200.00 


$ 


6,232,800.00 


$ 


6,241,200.00 



121,430.84 
114,968.66 
184,432.18 
168,855.02 



41,700.00 
9,641.63 



$ 


949,019.97 


$ 


641,028.33 


$ 


305.00 
1,389,975.93 


$ 


816.71 
1,401,519.37 


$ 


1,390,280.93 


$ 


1,402,336.08 



14,932.13 
120,166.34 



26,766.15 



161,864.62 



$ 786,588.94 
$ 786.588.94 



$ 17,963,285.20 



$ 17,817,617.97 



I 



PIEDMONT AND NORTHERN 



227 



MILES OF ROAD AT CLOSE OF YEAR— BY STATES AND TERRITORIES 





Road Operated By Respondent— Close of Year 1920 


State or Territory 


Line Owned 


Line Operated 

Under Trackage 

Rights 


Total Mileage 




Main Line 


Branch Lines 


Operated 


North Carolina.- . 


30.39 
101.20 


22.63 
41.23 


3.29 
7.58 


56.31 




150.01 






Total mileage (single track) 


131.59 


63.86 


10.87 


206.32 





Road Operated By Respondent— Close of Year 1921 


State or Territory 


Line Owned 


Line Operated 

Under Trackage 

Rights 


Total Mileage 




Main Line 


Branch Lines 


Operated 


North Carolina 

South Carolina 


30.39 
101.20 


22.27 
41.22 


3.29 
7.58 


55.95 
150.00 






Total mileage (single track) 


131.59 


63.49 


10.87 


205.95 



^28 



]S". C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



RAILWAY OPERATING REVENUES 





1920 


1921 


• 


Amount of 

Revenue for 

the Year 


Comparison 

With Revenue 

'of Preceding 

Year 

Increase 


Amount of 

Revenue for 

the Year 


Comparison 

With Revenue 

of Preceding 

Year 

Increase 


I. Revenue from Transportation: 


S 678,269.96 

1,593.17 

309.18 

244.99 

1,607.55 

1,026,734.58 

13,331.36 


$ 58,964.08 

*52.27 

309.18 

94.96 

755.77 

373,073.99 

1,803.72 


$ 464,071.52 

1,607.51 

576.73 

23,268.96 

1,139.78 

1,215,512.20 

8,780.00 


$ *214, 198.44 




14.34 




267.55 




23,023.97 




*467.77 




188,777.62 




*4,551.36 






Total revenue from transportation 


$ 1,722,090.79 


$ 434,949.43 


$ 1,714,956.70 


$ *7,134.09 


II. Revenue from Other Rail- 
way Operations: 


$ 6,785.35 

2,594.09 

18,614.04 

7,882.93 

44,154.48 

158,966.16 

471.90 

15.00 


$ 2,506.64 

1,176.02 

12,367.04 

1,667.25 

37,496.98 

*92,079.57 

471.90 

*29.00 


$ 4,408.00 
2,550.94 
12,342.30 
8,494.14 
43,720.21 
5,648.96 
644.40 


$ *2,377.35 


Storage 


*43.15 

*6,271.74 


Rent of tracks and facilities 


611.21 
*434.27 


Rent of bui Idi ngs and other property 


64,615.12 
172.50 


Miscellaneous 


*15.00 








Total revenue from other rail- 
way operations 


$ 21,551.63 


$ *36,152.74 


$ 77,808.95 


$ 56,257.32 


Total operating revenues 


$ 1,743,642.42 


$ 398,796.69 


$ 1,792,765.65 


$ 49,123.23 



*Denotes decrease. 
fDenotes Debit 



PIEDMONT AND NORTHERN 
RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES— ENTIRE LINE 



229 



Name of Railway Operating Expense Account 



Amount of 
Operating Ex- 
penses for the 

Year 1920 



Amount of 
Operating Ex- 
penses for the 
Year 1921 



I. Way and Structures: 

Superintendence of way and structures 

B alias t 

Ties 

Rails 

Rail fastenings and joints 

Special work 

Track and roadway labor 

Miscellaneous track and roadway expenses. 

Paving 

Cleaning and sanding track 

Removal of snow and ice 

Bridges, trestles, and culverts 

Crossings, fences, and signs 

Signal and interlocking apparatus 

Telephone and telegraph lines 

Miscellaneous way expenses 

Poles and fixtures 

Distribution system 

Miscellaneous electric line expenses 

Buildings, fixtures, and grounds 



Total way and structures . 



II. Equipment: 
Superintendence of equipment- - 
Passenger and combination cars. 
Freight, express, and mail cars__ 

Service equipment 

Electric equipment of cars 

Locomotives 

Shop equipment 

Shop expenses 

Vehicles and horses 

Depreciation of equipment 

Equipment retired 



Total equipment . 



III. Power: 

Superintendence of power 

Power plant buildings, fixtures, and grounds 

Substation equipment 

Transmission system 

Miscellaneous power plant supplies and expenses . 

Substation employees 

Substation supphes and expenses 

Power purchased 

Power exchanged^balance 

Power transferred — credit 



Total power . 



15,071.93 

1,740.75 

103,065.93 

*509.88 

790.42 

1,214.56 

91,905.21 

903.34 

*42.50 

1,002.80 

201.29 

11,039.15 

8,433.04 

488.03 

3,502.34 

*175.77 

17,277.93 

43,270.19 

162.09 

.18,314.03 



317,654.88 



11,337.98 
48,543.63 
18,462.79 
4,779.70 
11,474.66 
29,695.30 
160.37 
10,800.48 



27,062.29 
*4, 017.67 



158,299.53 



5,560.70 

33.30 

5,905.95 

537.69 



31,498.70 

872.80 

139,179.76 

170.65 

*5,943.91 



177,815.64 



14,725.14 

2,350.16 

105,079.51 

*63.13 

640.94 

1,677.34 

58,398.15 

*374.49 

215.34 

808.91 

204.60 

9,248.07 

9,486.90 

324.52 

2,680.46 



18,302.64 

20,810.08 

38.00 

9,541.49- 



254,094.63 



10,425.48 
35,320.14 
22,785.59 

2,308.55 

14,173.88 

24,140.58 

241.86 

9,509.62 

147.36 

27,080.40 



146,133.46 



6,376.61 

197.45 

6,262.26 

60.16 

9,000.00 

20,308.35 

1,611.73 

136,593.67 

1,076.40 

♦7,025.61 



174,461.02 



"Denotes debit 



230 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES— ENTIRE L\NE~Continued 



Name of Railway Operating Expense Account 


Amount of 
Operating Ex- 
penses for the 
Year 1920 


Amount of 
Operating Ex- 
penses for the 
Year 1921 


IV. Conducting Transportation: 


$ 24,834.48 

64,448.25 

100,507.65 

6,767.29 

112,458.86 

19,290.18 

32,650.68 


$ 24 167 50 


Passenger conductors, motormen, and trainmen 


52 501 87 


Freight and express conductors, motormen, and trainmen 


76,330.08 
6 832 37 




93 194 11 




17 127 07 




21,850.36 




3.50 




6.98 

2,179.96 

29,500.39 

7,411.69 






2,611.59 


Loss and damage 


21,345.26 
8 215 48 


Other transportation expenses 






Total conducting transportation 


% 400,056.41 


$ 324 179 19 






V. Traffic: 


$ 31,542.57 

1,101.36 

75.00 

1,398.56 


1 35 786 60 




2 585 96 








2,837.56 






Total traffic _ 


$ 34,117.49 


$ 41,210.12 






VI. General and Miscellaneous: 

Salaries and expenses of general officers 

Salaries and expenses of general office clerks 

General office suppHes and expenses 

Law expenses 


$ 34,617.92 

58,983.26 

5,015.76 

7,596.90 


$ 33,149.53 

57,007.89 

4,884.89 

9 177 20 


Pensions and gratuities 


25 00 


Miscellaneous general expenses 


8,128.59 

30,150.69 

11,515.30 

23,262.87 

4,578.07 

850.27 

35,038.39 

138,349.29 


6 872 58 


Injuries and damages 


13 186 64 


Insurance 


13,253 24 


Stationery and printing 


29,192.91 


Store expenses 


4,095.40 


Garage and stable expenses 


355.04 


Rent of tracks and facilities 


31,421.52 


Rent of equipment 


148,936.77 






Total general and miscellaneous 


$ 358.087.31 


$ 351,558.61 


Recapitulation of Expenses: 

I. Way and structures 


$ 317,654.88 
158,299.53 
177,815.64 
400,056.41 
34,117.49 
358,087.31 


$ 254,094.63 
146,133.46 


III. Power 


174,461.02 
324,179.19 


V. Traffic 

VI. General and miscellaneous 


41,210.12 
351,558.61 


Grand total operating expenses 

Operating ratio (ratioof operatingexpenses to operating revenues) 


$ 1,446.031.26 

% 82.91 


$ 1,291.637.03 
% 72.00 



PIEDMONT AND NORTHERN 



^^31 



RAIL-LINE STATISTICS— ENTIRE LINE 



Item 



Passenger car mileage 

Freight, mail, and express car mileage 

Total car mileage 

Regular fare passengers carried 

Total revenue passengers carried 

Passenger revenue* 

Average fare, revenue passengers 

Average fare, all passengers 

Total revenue from transportation 

Revenue from transportation per car-mile 

Total revenue from other railway operations 

Revenue from other railway operations, per car-mile 

Total operating revenues 

Operating revenues, per car-mile 

Total operating expenses 

Operating expenses , per car-mile 



1920 


1921 


Number 


Number 


or 


or 


Amount 


Amount 


1,051,648 


934,941 


1,296,500 


2,047,192 


2,348,148 


2,982.133 


1,595,517 


1,234,131 


1,595,517 


1,234,131 


$ 678,269.96 


$ 464,071.52 


.42511 


.37603 


.42511 


.37603 


1,722,090.79 


1,714,956.70 


.73338 


.57508 


21.551.63 


77,808.95 


.00918 


.02609 


1,743,642.42 


1,792,765.65 


.74256 


.60177 


1.446,031.26 


1,291,637.03 


.61582 


.43312 



232 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



Raleigh and Charleston Railroad Company 

HISTORY 

Organized December 2, 1905; chartered December 5, 1905, under laws of South Carolina and act of 
General Assembly entitled "An Act to provide for the formation of railroad, steamboat, street railway, 
and canal companies, to define the powers, and amend the charters thereof," approved February 28, 
1899. 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President 


S. Davies Warfield 

C. Lane 

Robt. L. Nutt 


Baltimore, Md 


Superi ntendent 


Marion, S C 




New York, N. Y 









DIRECTORS 

S. Davies Warfield, Baltimore, Md.; Chas. R. Capps, Norfolk, Va.; M. J. Caples, Norfolk, Va.; 
Robt. L. Nutt, New York, N. Y.; Geo. F. Armstrong, Savannah, Ga.; A. P. McAllister, Lumberton, 
N.C.; F. Sitterding, Richmond, Va.; W. Stockhouse, Marion, S. C.; R. J. Blackwell, Marion, S. C. 

ROAD OPERATED 





To 


Miles 




N.C. 


Total 


Lumberton, N. C. 


Marion, S. C 


22.24 


43.00 







KALEIGH AND CHARLESTOlvr 



233 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC.— ENTIRE LINE 



1920 



1921 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue... 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, N. C 



574,500.00 

13,360.46 

550,000.00 

12,790.70 

1,093,300.17 

25,425.59 

19,231.31 

447.24 

25,872.83 

110,207.51 

140,818.57 

*30,611.06 

2,562.96 

3,274.85 

84,135.54 

22,821.12 

1,956.64 

49,092 

530.72 

3,200.85 

.03296 

2,010.92 



574,500.00 

13,360.46 

550,000.00 

12,790.70 

1,094,607.61 

25,455.99 

20,049.70 

466.27 

25,922.26 

127,901.81 

93,040.74 

34,861.07 

2,974.46 

2,163.74 

106,074.42 

19,164.35 

2,466.85 

31.786 

445.68 

2,663.04 

.03612 

1,640.72 



Employees: Number general officers, 1; office clerks, 3; station agents, 9; other station men, 4; 
enginemen, 3; firemen, 3; conductors, 3; other trainmen, 5; carpenters,!; other shopmen, 38; section 
foremen. 2; other trackmen, 21; other employees, 1; total, 62. 

CAPITAL STOCK, ETC.-NORTH CAROLINA 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt , 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road •. 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revepue, per mile 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 



1920 



277,363.16 

13,360.46 

265,534.93 

12,790.70 

527,835.25 

25,425.59 

9,284.70 

447.24 

25,872.83 

53,207.05 

67,975.88 

*14,768.83 

2,562.96 

3.274.85 

40,619.94 

11,017.74 

1,956.64 

530.72 

1,569.47 

.03296 



1921 



297,136.63 

13,360.46 

284,465.17 

12,790.70 

566,141.22 

25,455.99 

10,369.84 

466.27 

25,922.26 

66,151.99 

48,121.57 

18,030.42 

2,974.46 

2,163.74 

54,862.74- 

9,911.92 

2,466.85, 

445.68 

1,377.31 

.03612 



'Deficit. 



-26 



234 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



Randolph and Cumberland Railway Company 

HISTORY 

Organized June 30, 1906, under laws of North Carolina. Charter amended private act of General 
Assembly, 1907; Private Laws, Chapter 442. Charter amended private act of General Assembly, 
N.C., 1911. 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President 


S. P. McConnell 


Carthage N C 


General Manager or Superintendent 


S. P. McConnell 


Carthage N C 


Secretary and Treasurer 


B. M. Fellows 


New York N Y 









DIRECTORS 

B. M. Fellows, 949 Broadway, New York, N. Y.; Mayo McConnell, Carthage, N. C; T. C. Sin- 
clair, Carthage, N. C; D. A. McDonald, Carthage, N. C; S. P. McConnell, Carthage, N. C; T. B. 
Tyson, Carthage, N. C; W. G. Jennings, Carthage, N. C. 

ROAD OPERATED 



From 


To 


Miles 




N.C. 


Total 


Cameron, N. C 


McConnell, N. C 


22.5 


22.5 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue. -. 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 



1920 



1921 



1,000,000.00 


$ 1,000,000.00 


44,444.44 


44,444.44 


138,000.00 


138,000.00 


6,133.33 


6,133.33 


1,203,854.32 


1,259,423.47 


53,504.63 


55,974.20 


29,479.71 




1,310.21 




54,814.84 




37,317.88 


40,058.55 


95,132.03 


46,146.79 


57,814.15 


♦6,088.24 


1,658.57 


1,780.38 


4,228.09 


2,050.96 


31,834.48 


33,088.03 


1,886.83 


1,927.01 


1,414.86 


1.470.57 


6,289 


6,302 


83.86 


$ 84.06 


3,596.57 


5.043.51 


.03 


.03057 



Employees: Numberigeneral officers, 1; office clerks, 1; 
enginemen, 2; firemen, 2;i conductors, 1; other trainmen, 1; 
other employees, 1; totalj29. 



station agents, 4; other station men, 1; 
section foremen, 3; other trackmen, 12; 



"Deficit. 



KOANOKE RAILWAY 



235 



Roanoke Railway Company 



HISTORY 

Organized August 30, 1910, under laws of North Carolina; section No. 2549, of the Revisal of North 
Carolina. 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President 




Franklin, Va. 


General Manager or Superintendent . 


P.R.Camp 


Franklin, Va. 




J. L. Camp, Jr., and B. J. Ray. 
Vaughan Camp.- 


Franklin, Va. 


Traffic Manager 


Franklin, Va. 



DIRECTORS 

J. L. Camp, Franklin, Va.; P. D. Camp, Franklin, Va.; J. L. Camp, Jr., Franklin, Va.; B.J.Ray, 
Franklin, Va.; P. R. Camp, Franklin, Va.; J. M. Camp, Wallace, N. C; T. D. Savage, Norfolk, Va. 

ROAD OPERATED 



From 


To 


Miles 




N.C. 


Total 


Thelma, N. C. 


Virginia state line 


5.64 






Brunswick, Virginia 


15.00 











236 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt ..- 

Funded debt, per mile -. 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue.. 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, N. C 



1920 



50,000.00 
8,865.25 
none 
none 

130,441.18 

23,127.90 

6,050.00 

1,063.84 

24,191.74 

27,044.88 

34,117.90 

*7,073.02 

4,795.19 

6,049.30 

27,044.88 

none 

4,795.19 
none 
none 
none 
none 
1,307.83 



1921 



50,000.00 

3,333.33 

none 

none 

130,744.69 

8,716.31 

1,867.00 

124.47 

8,840.78 

41,258.79 

45,236.19 

*3,977.40 

2,748.39 

3,015.74 

41,258.79 

none 

2,748.39 
none 
none 
none 
none 

1,461.98 



Employees: Number general officers, 5; office clerks, 2; station agents, 1; enginemen, 1; firemen, 
1; conductors,!; other trainmen, 1 ; section foremen, 1; other trackmen, 8; total 21. 



^Deficit. 



BOCKINGHAM RAILROAD 



237 



Rockingham Railroad Company 



HISTORY 

Organized 1910, under laws of North Carolina. 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President 


T. C. Leak 

J. L. Hawley 

J. LeGrand Everett 


Rockingham, N. C. 


General Superintendent 

Secretary and Treasurer 


Rockingham, N. C. 
Rockingham, N. C. 







DIRECTORS 

Williams Entwistle, Rockingham, N. C; W. L. Parsons, Rockingham, N. C.; John L. Everett, 
Rockingham, N. C; T. C. Leak, Rockingham, N. C.; H. C. Wall, Rockingham, N. C; J. LeGrand 
Everett, Rockingham, N. C. 

ROAD OPERATED 



From 


To 


Miles 




N. C. 


Total 


Leak, N'. C. .. 


Gibson, N. C.-.- - 


21.4 











CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue. -. 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, N. C 



1920 



1921 



72,000.00 


$ 72,000.00 


3,364.48 


3,364.48 


250,000.00 


250,000.00 


11,682.24 


11,682.24 


301,078.93 


301,078.93 


14,069.11 


14,069.11 


18,863.04 


18,863.04 


881.45 


881.45 


14,950.56 


14,950.56 


57,965.51 


65,376.79 


72,745.78 


54,519.32 


*14,780.27 


10,857.47 


2,798.66 


3,054.98 


3,399.33 


3,547.63 


57,213.47 


64,545.89 


752.04 


830.90 


2,673.52 


3,016.16 


1,470 


1,467 


35.14 


$ 38.82 


.23 


.26 


1,376.14 


1,031.40 



Employees: Number general officers, 3; office clerks, 2; station agents, 2; other station men, 2; 
enginemen, 1; firemen, 1; conductors, 1; other trainmen, 2; machinists, 1; other shopmen, 1; section 
foremen, 2; other trackmen, 12; other employees, 2; total 32, 



'Deficit. 



238 



U. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



Smoky Mountain Railway Company 

HISTORY 

Organized August 2, 1905, under laws of North Carolina. Private Laws of North Carolina, 1909, 
Chapter 151. Charter amended by act ratified February 26, 1909. 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President 


W. M. Ritter 


Columbus, Ohio 


Superi ntendent 


E. E. Ritter 


Asheville, N. C. 


Secretary 


James L. Hamil 


Columbus, Ohio 


Treasurer 




C. B. Weakley 


Columbus, Ohio 


Traffic Manager 


W. E. Weakley 


Columbus, Ohio 









DIRECTORS 

W. M. Ritter, Columbus, Ohio; James L. Hamil, Columbus, Ohio; C. B. Weakley, Columbus, 
Ohio; Landon C.Bell, Columbus, Ohio; R. E. Pendleton, Columbus, Ohio; S. G. Bernard, Asheville, 
N. C. 

ROAD OPERATED 





To 


Miles 




N. C. 


Total 


Ritter, N. C 


Bone Valley, N. C 


9.6 


9.6 









i 



SMOKY MOUNTAIN RAILWAY 



239 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



1920 



1921 



Capital stock.- 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost oi equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, N. C 



50,000.00 


$ 50,000.00 


5,208.33 


5,208.33 


23,000.00 


23,000.00 


2,395.83 


2,395.83 


10,132.59 


8,526.62 


1,055.47 


888.11 


4,369.30 


3,811.55 


455.13 


397.04 


1,510.61 


1,285.15 


29,219.97 


40,760.19 


48,868.27 


33,965.86 


*9, 648.30 


6,794.33 


4,085.41 


4,245.85 


5,090.44 


3,538.11 


38,327.98 


40,283.69 


891.99 


476.50 


3,992.49 


4,196.22 


5,133 


2,704 


92.91 


$ 49.64 


.043 


.042 


431.20 


686.49 



Employees: Number general officers, 2; office clerks, 5; station agents, 2; enginemen, 1; firemen, 
1; conductors, 1; other trainmen, 1; section foremen, 1; other trackmen, 8; other employees, 1; total, 23. 



'Deficit. 



240 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



Tennessee and North Carolina Railway Company 

HISTORY 

The present company was organized on June 26, 1920, to succeed the Tennessee and North 
Carolina Railroad Company, and is a merged corporation. The Tennessee and North Carolina 
Railway Company, a North Carolina corporation, and the Tennessee and North Carolina Railway 
Company, a Tennessee corporation, were merged on June 28, 1920, to form one of hke name. The old 
company, known as the Tennessee and North Carolina Railroad Company, was incorporated in 
the states of Tennessee and North Carolina about March 6, 1903. On June 27, 1911, these two 
corporations were merged into the Tennessee and North Carolina Railroad Company. On Sep- 
tember 13, 1916, company went into the hands of a receiver and was operated until June 7, 1920, at 
which time the road was sold by foreclosure proceedings at public auction, and was purchased on 
.behalf of the bondholders, and was reorganized on June 26, 1920, under the present name. 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President T 

Vice-President 

Secretary and Treasurer 

Traffic Manager 


C. Boice 

W. J. Parks . 

J.W.Bell 

W. J. Parks 


Newport, Tenn. 
Newport, Tenn. 
Newport Tenn. 
Newport, Tenn. 



DIRECTORS 

C. Boice, Newport, Tenn.; J. W. Bell, Newport, Tenn.; W. J. Parks, Newport, Tenn.; F. E. Alley, 
Waynesville, N. C; D. R. Noland, Waynesville, N. C; D. L. Boyd, Waynes ville, N. C; H.S.Man- 
tooth, Newport, Tenn. 

ROAD OPERATED 





To 


Miles 




N. C. 


Total 




Crestmont, N. C 

Spruce, N. C 


2.00 
14.95 


22.16 


West Canton, N. C 


14.95 









TENNESSEE AND NORTH CAROLINA RAILAVAY 



241 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of eciuipment ^ 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of>road and equipment, per mile. _, 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not 

included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning 

revenue 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile. 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 
Taxes paid, N. C 



All mileage in N. C 
is leased and these 
figures do not apply 
to any part of leased 
lines. 



Applicable N. C. 



1920 



r $ 250,000.00 


$ 250,000,00 


12,400.00 


12,400.80 


none 


none 


none 


none 


i 170,911.89 


220,911.89 


1 8,477.77 


10,957.93 


19,650.00 


19,550.00 


974.70 


969.74 


L 9,452.47 


11,927.67 


86,736.63 


61,166.74 


66,063.72 


49,450.32 


20,672.91 


11,716.42 


5,117.20 


3,608.66 


3,897.56 


2,917.42 


72,243.21 


53,596.35 


< 8,804.91 


5,436.43 


4,439.13 


3,162.03 


2,201,200 


14,132 


$ 519.47 


$ 320.73 


2,688.51 


4,704.75 


.024 


.023 


L 981.74 


1,430.97 



1921 



Employees: Number general officers, 4; office clerks, 3; station agents, 5; other station men, 1; 
enginemen, 2; firemen, 2; conductors, 2; other trainmen, 3; machinists, 2; carpenters, 2; other shop- 
men, 5; section foremen, 4; other trackmen, 18; total, 53. 



242 



N. C. CORPORATIOSr COMMISSION 



The Pigeon River Railway Company 

(Leased to Tennessee and North Carolina Railroad Company) 

HISTORY 

Organized November 2, 1906, under laws of North Carolina; Chapter 61 entitled "Railroads, 
Vol. 1, Revisal of 1905, of North Carolina. 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




A.J.Stevens 


Philadelphia, Pa. 




W. J. Parks 






D. G. Wilson 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


Traffic Manager .. .. . 


W. J. Parks 











DIRECTORS 

A. J. Stevens, Philadelphia, Pa.; E. M. Bechtel, Philadelphia, Pa.; Fred H. Ely, Philadelphia. 
Pa.; R. G. Rogers, Sunburst, N. C; E. A. Gaskill, Sunburst, N. C. 

ROAD OPERATED 



From 


To 


Miles 




N.C. 


Total 


West Canton, N. C 


Spruce, N. C 


14.95 


14.95 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



1920 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile . 



40,000.00 

2,675.59 

867,494.54 

58,026.39 

337,186.24 

22,554.27 

2,758.30 

184.50 

22,738.77 



40,000.00 

2,675.59 

867,494.54 

58,026.39 

337,186.24 

22,554.27 

1,654.98 

110.70 

22,664.97 



TOWNSVILLE RAILKOAD 



243 



Townsville Railroad Company 



HISTORY 

Organized July 2, 1921, under laws of North Carolina. North Carolina Revisal, 1905, Section 2548 
and following. 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




J. R. Paschall 

S. R. Adams 

W. F. Kinsey 

R. B. Taylor. 


Norlina, N. C. 


General Manager or Superintendent 


Townsville, N. C. 
Norlina, N. C. 


Traffic Manager 


Townsville, N. C. 







DIRECTORS 

J. R. Paschall, Jr., NorUna, N. C. ; R. B. Taylor, Townsville, N. C. ; S. R. Adams, Townsville, N. C . 
J. E. Kimball, Townsville, N. C; C. S. Taylor, Townsville, N. C; E. M. Thorpe, Townsend, Ga. 

ROAD OPERATED 



^ From 


To 


Miles 




N.C. 


Total 


Mason, N. C. 


Townsville, N C 


12 


12 









CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



1921 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included). 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile i 

Revenue from other sources 

Taxes paid, N. C 



210,000.00 

17,500.00 

40,000.00 

3,333.33 

242,458.22 

20,204.85 

19,973.19 

1,664.43 

21,889.28 

3,813.71 

4,000.87 

187.16 

317.81 

333.41 

3,551.21 

295.93 

262.50 



210,000.00 

17,500.00 

49,000.00 

3,333.33 

249,564.62 

20,797.05 

20,673.19 

1,722.76 

22,519.81 

6,973.24 

5,600.44 

1,372.80 

581.10 

466.70 

6,413.69 

534.47 

559.55 

575.92 



Employees: Number general officers, 4; 
foremen, 1; other trackmen, 3; total 13. 



station agents, 3; enginemen, 1; firemen, 1; section 



244 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



Virginia and Carolina Southern Railroad Company 

HISTORY 

Organized January 11, 1907, under laws of North Carolina. Private Acts 1903; Private Acts 1907 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




A. W. McLean . 






J. Q. Beckwith . _. -. 












A. T. McLean . ... ._ 






W.W.Davis - 











DIRECTORS 

A. W. McLean, Lumberton, N. C; F. P. Gray, Lumberton, N. C; A. T. McLean, Lumberton, 
N. C; H. B. Jennings, Lumberton, N. C; L. H. Caldwell, Lumberton, N. C; A. E. White, Lumberton, 
N. C. 

ROAD OPERATED 





To 


Miles 




N. C. 


Total 


Hope Mills, N. C. . .- 




25.23 
27.70 


52.935 


St. Paul, N. C. 


EHzabethtown, N. C. . - 











J 



VIKGI^s^IA AND CAKOLINA SOTJTHEKN RAILKOAD 



245 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



1920 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt , per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue. __ 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, N.C 



141,000.00 

2.663.39 

524,000.00 

9,899.30 

651,682.58 

12,312.88 

74,145.17 

1,400.68 

13,714.08 

174,979.48 

123,074.52 

51,904.96 

3,305.55 

2,325.01 

134,747.89 

30.174.46 

2.545.53 

58.268 

570.00 

10,057.13 

.110 

3,414.90 



141,000.00 

2,663.39 

524.000.00 

9,899.30 

653,614.23 

12,345.96 

76,285.23 

1,441.11 

13,787.07 

162,309.70 

107,007.55 

55,302.15 

3,066.20 

2,019.60 

128,985.13 

28,671.70 

. 2.436.67 

39,432 

543.51 

4,652.67 

.079 

4,339.83 



Employees: Number general officers, 5; office clerks, 4; station agents, 4; other station men, 6; 
enginemen, 3; firemen, 3; conductors, 3; other trainmen, 5; machinists, 2; carpenters, 1; section fore- 
men, 5; other trackmen, 22; total, 63. 



246 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



Warrenton Railroad Company 

HISTORY 

Organized April 21, 1876, under laws of North Carolina. Battle's Revisal. 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




J. M. Gardner 

B. P. Terrell . 


Warrenton, N. C. 




Warrenton, N. C. 


Secretary and Treasurer 


C. L. Rodwell 


Warrenton, N. C. 



DIRECTORS 

W. B. Boyd, Warrenton, N. C; R. B. Boyd, Warrenton, N. C; R. T. Watson, Warrenton, N. C; 
C. E. Jackson, Warrenton, N. C; M. P. Burwell, Warrenton, N. C; W. G. Rogers, Warrenton, N. C. 

ROAD OPERATED 



From 


To 


Miles 




N.C. 


Total 


Warrenton, N. C. 


Warren Plains, N. C. 


3.00 


3.00 









CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 





1920 


1921 


Capital stock 


% 66,000.00 

22,000.00 

none 

none 

67,575.57 

22,525.19 

6,463.85 

2,154.62 

24,679.81 

32,959.45 

22,169.81 

10,789.64 

10,986.48 

7,389.94 

30,877.29 

1,701.45 

10,292.43 

2,308 

$ 567.15 

388.71 

.06 

346.11 


$ 66,000.00 


Capital stock, per mile 


22,000.00 


Funded debt I 


none 


Funded debt, per mile 


none 


Cost of road 


68,075.57 


Cost of road, per mile 


22,691.86 


Cost of equipment 


6,463.85 


Cost of equipment, per mile 


2,154.62 


Cost of road and equipment, per mile 


24,846.48 


Operating revenue 


35,947.09 


Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 


26,156.41 


Net operating revenue 


9,790.68 


Operating revenue, per mile 


11,982.36 


Operating expenses, per mile 


8,718.80 


Total freight revenue 


34,032.15 


Total passenger train service revenue 


1,914.94 


Freight revenue, per mile 


11,344.05 


Total number passengers carried earning revenue 


1,142 


Passenger service train revenue, per mile 


$ 638.31 






Average receipts per passenger, per mile 


.07 


Taxes paid, N. C 


561.77 



Employees: Number general officers, 5; station agents, 1; other station men, 4; enginemen, 1; 
firemen, 1; other trainmen, 1; total, 13. 



WASHINGTON AND VANDEMERE RAILROAD 



247 



Washington and Vandemere Railroad Company 

HISTORY 

Organized December 5, 1903, under laws of North Carolina. Chartered by Act of General Assembly- 
Chapter 245, Private Laws of 1903. Amended by Act of General Assembly, Chapter 40, Private Laws 
of 1907. 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President 


A. D. McLean 


Washington, N. C. 


General Manager or Superintendent 


P. R. Albright 


Wilmington, N. C. 


Secretary and Treasurer 


Jno. T. Reid 


Wilmington, N. C. 









DIRECTORS 

A. D. McLean, Washington, N. C; Geo. T. Leach, Washington, N. C; Lyman Delano, Wilming- 
ton, N. C; R. D. Cronly, Wilmington, N. C. 

ROAD OPERATED 



From 


To 


Miles 




N.C. 


Total 


Washington Junction, N. C . ... 




40.94 


40.94 









248 



N. C. CORPOEATION COMMISSION 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Capital stock .* 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile : 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue. .- 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, N. C 



1920 



125,000.00 

3,117.67 

1,176,857.90 

28,745.89 

766,680.45 

18,726.93 

76,825.60 

1,876.54 

20,603.47 

87,116.68 

91,817.87 

*4,701.19 

2,127.91 

2,242.74 

62,446.91 

23,202.73 

1,525.33 

32,565 

566. 75 

1,467.04 

.0293 

3,469.96 



1921 



125,000.00 

3,124.22 

,201,594.23 

30,032.35 

766,820.89 

19,165.73 

76,420.60 

1,910.31 

21.076.04 

74,079.75 

124,508.30 

*50,428.55 

1,809.47 

3,041.23 

56,003.78 

16,231.67 

1,367.95 

17,745 

396.47 

1,844.30 

.0330 

3,994.90 



Employees: Number general officers, 1 
firemen, 1; conductors, 1; other trainmen, 3; 
10; total, 40. 

Number of officers serving without compensation, 6 



station agents, 3; other station men, 1; enginemen, 2; 
section foremen, 4; other trackmen, 14; other employees. 



'^Deficit. 



WATAUGA AND YADKIN RIVEK RAILROAD 



249 



Watauga and Yadkin River Railroad Company 

HISTORY 

Organized March 6, 1905, under laws of North Carolina. Chapter 411, Private Laws 1905, Chapter 
408, Public 1909. Chapter 37, Private Laws 1908, Chapter 316, Private Laws, 1911, Chapter 2, Private 
Laws, 1913. 

ROAD OPERATED 





To 


Miles 




N. C. 


Total 


North Wilkesboro, N. C. - 


Darby and Grandin, N. C 


30.20 









CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Road not operated. 





1920 


1921 


Cost of road 


$ 


616,040.76 

20,398.70 

52,057.51 

1,723.75 

22,142.45 




Cost of road, per mile .. .. 




Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 




Cost of road and equipment, per mile 









-27 



250 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

Wellington and Powellsville Railroad Company 



HISTORY 

Organized October 20, 1893, under laws of North Carolina. Chartered under Public Laws 1883, 
Chapter 258. Amended under Public Laws 1897. Chapter 21. 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President and Treasurer 

Superi ntendent 

Secretary 


A. T. Baker 

W. M. Corwin 

Elizabeth Branning Baker 


Ahoskie, N. C. 
Ahoskie, N. C. 
Ahoskie, N. C. 



DIRECTORS 

A. T. Baker, Ahoskie, N. C; Elizabeth Branning Baker, Norfolk, Va.; Florence V. S. Chapin' 
Detroit, Mich.; A. E. Chapin, Detroit, Mich.; E. Schryver, Norfolk, Va.; J.H. Small, Washington, D.C" 

ROAD OPERATED 





To 


Miles 




N. C. 


Total 


Windsor, N. C 


Ahoskie, N. C 


22 


22 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operat i ng revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included). 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight re\ enue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Kevenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, N. C 



1920 



90,000.00 


$ 90,000.00 


4,090.91 


4,090.91 


95,766.74 


116.566.74 


4,353.03 


5,298.48 


191.869.05 


188,903.98 


8,721.32 


8,586.54 


73,893.60 


73.117.05 


74.285.63 


81,461.79 


*392.03 


*8,344.74 


3,358.80 


3,323.50 


3,376.62 


3,702.81 


60,581.97 


60,007.12 


11,133.85 


12,124.12 


2,753.72 


2,727.60 


20,060 


13,734 


506.08 


$ 551.09 


2,177.78 


985.81 


. 55502 


.041 


936.16 


1,256.47 



Employets: Number general officers, 3; office clerks, 3; station agents, .'" ; other ; tation men, 1 ; 
enginemen, 2; firemen, 2; conductors, 2; other trainmen, 6; machinists, Ir carpenters, 3; othershop- 
men, 4; section foremen, 3; other trackmen, 18; other employees, 2; total, 55. 



^Defi( 



WILMINGTON, BRUNSWipK AND SOUTHERN RAILROAD 



251 



Wilmington, Brunswick and Southern Railroad Company 

HISTORY 

Organized January 22, 1907, under laws of North Carolina. The railroad was originally built from 
Navassa to Bolivia by the Town Creek Railroad and Lumber Company. In 1911, the Wilmington, 
Brunswick and Southern Railroad was chartered under the corporation law and the road was, in 1912, 
completed to Southport. 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




M. J. Corbett 

M. W. Divine 

Walker Taylor 

H. C. McQueen 

C. J. Field 

F. J. SuUivan 


Wilmington, N. C. 




Wilmington, N. C. 


Secretary 


Wilmington, N. C. 
Wilmington, N. C. 


Traffic Manager 

Auditor 


Southport, N. C. 
Wilmington, N. C. 



DIRECTORS 

M. J. Corbett, M. W. Divine, Walker Taylor, H. C. McQueen, C. E. Taylor, Jr., Z. W. Whitehead, 
T. B. Gault, and J. W. Brooks, of Wilmington, N. C; J. A. Jones, Laurinburg, N. C. 

ROAD OPERATED 



From 


To 


Miles 




N. C. 


Total 


Navassa, N. C 


Southport, N. C 


30 









252 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



1920 



1921 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, N. C 



165,000.00 

5,500.00 

93,750.00 

3,125.00 

409,354.30 

13,645.14 

44,149.01 

1,471.61 

453,593.31 

77,107.19 

78,816.56 

*1, 709.37 

2,570.24 

2,627.22 

44,002.63 

21,250.00 

1,466.75 

37,550 

7,083.33 

11,854.56 

.566 

1,405.35 



165,000.00 

5,500.00 

93,750.00 

3,125.00 

431,867.21 

14,395.57 

44,149.01 

1,471.63 

15,867.21 

64,023.26 

78,613.59 

*14,590.33 

2,134.11 

2,620.45 

45,745.14 

11,072.27 

1,524.84 

18,117 

36,907.00 

793.00 

.02 

1,302.92 



Employees: Number general officers, 6; oftxce clerks, 1; station agents, 2; other station men, 2; 
enginemen, 2; firemen, 2; conductors, 1; other trainmen, 4; machinists, 1; other shopmen, 1; sec- 
tion foremen, 2; other trackmen, 16; total, 40. 



"Deficit. 



WINSTON-SALEM SOUTHBOUND RAILROAD 253 

Winston-Salem Southbound Railroad Company 

For the Year Ending December 31, 1921 
OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President 


H. E. Fries 


Winston-Salem, N. C. 


Vice-President 


J. R. Kenly 


Wilmington, N. C. 


Secretary 


J. F. Post, Jr. 


Wilmington, N. C. 


Treasurer 


John T. Reid 


Wilmington, N. C. 


Attorneys 


Craig and Vogler 

H. C. Prince 


Winston-Salem, N. C. 


General Auditor 


Wilmington, N. C. 


General Manager 

Chief Engineer 

General Superintendent 

Traffic Manager 


H.E. Fries 

J. E. Willoughby 

G. F. Turley 

S. P.Collier 


Winston-Salem, N. C. 
Wilmington, N. C. 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 



DIRECTORS 

H. E. Fries, Winston-Salem, N. C; N. D. Maher, Roanoke, Va.; J. R. Kenly, Wilmington, N. C. 
George B. EUiott, Wilmington, N. C; A. C. Needles, Roanoke, Va.; D. W. Flickwir,' Roanoke, Va. 

ROAD OPERATED 



From 


To 


Miles 


N. C. 


Total 


Winston-Salem, N. C. 


Wadesboro Junction, N, C 


87.70 
6.46 
6.65 








Trackage rights 












Total 




100 81 











CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue, .. 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, N. C 

Employees — number 

Compensation 



1920 



1921 



1,245,000.00 


$ 1,245,000.00 


13,251.73 


13,251.73 


5,000,000.00 


5,000,000.00 


53,219.79 


53,219.79 


5,865,604.03 


5,875,427.77 


66,882.20 


66,994.73 


1,139,484.54 


934,792.60 


1,081,005.87 


822,375.86 


58,478.67 


112,416.74 


11,306.65 


9,272.82 


10,726.39 


8,157.68 


966,893.93 


809,288.27 


159,060.65 


114,326.41 


9,594.11 


8,027.86 


137,750 


76,132 


1,578.30 


$ 1,134.08 


13,529.96 


11,177.92 


.02962 


.03310 


40,734.62 


30,844.62 


233 


220 


373,072.18 


$ 278,323.35 



254 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



EXPRESS COMPANIES 



American Railway Express Company 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


Chairman of the Board 


Burns D. Caldwell 


New York N Y 


President 


Geo. C. Taylor 


New York N Y 


Vice-President in Charge of Operations 


R. E. M. Cowie 


New York, N Y 


Vice-President in Charge of Operations 


E. A. Stedman 


Chicago, 111 


Vice-President in Charge of Operations 


C. D. Summy 


St. Louis, Mo 


Vice-President in Charge of Operations 


Wm. G. Smith 


Atlanta, Ga 


Vice-President in Charge of Operations 


A. Christison 


San Francisco, Cal 


Vice-President in Charge of Traffic 


D. S. ElUott 


New York, N Y 


Vice-President in Charge of Accounts 


Chas. A. Lutz 


New York, N Y 


Secretary 

Vice-President and Treasurer 

Assistant General Counsel 

General Auditor 

General Auditor 


F. P. Small 

F. S. Holbrook 

H. S. Marx 

J. F. Brizzie . 

Richard Burr 

H. D. Freeman 

T. Burroughs 


New York, N. Y. 
New York, N. Y. 
New York, N. Y. 
Chattanooga, Tenn. 
Chicago, 111 


General Auditor 

General Auditor 


Philadelphia, Pa. 
New York, N. Y. 



DIRECTORS 

J. S. Alexander, New York City; W. M. Barrett, New York City; B. D. Caldwell, New York City; 
H. W. DeForest, New York City; J. H. Harding, New York City; Chas. Hayden, New York City J 
G. A. Peabody, New York City; J. G. Milburn, New York City; Chas. D. Norton, New York City' 
Mortimer L. Schiff, New York City; G. C. Taylor, New York City; A. H. Wiggin, New York City' 



MILEAGE BY STATES AND TERRITORIES 



State or Territory 


Total Mileage 
1920 


Total Mileage 
1921 




4,377.50 

4,169.30 

2,133.63 

4,583.28 

8,844.74 

4,851.59 

1,011.51 

315.90 

34.30 

4,477.30 

6,875.80 

159.30 

2,821.78 

11,687.77 
7,027.39 

10,455.22 
9,457.68 
3,409.52 
4,559.75 
2,032.16 


2,877.90 


Alaska . . .. ... 


3,935.30 




2,133.63 




4,281.14 




8,982.31 




4.809.49 




1,011.51 




315.90 




38.30 


Florida - 


4,471.00 


Georgia - 


5,466.50 


Hawaii -. -- . 


351.30 


Idaho --- 


2,804.68 


Illinois - . - -- 


11,447.40 


Indiana .. .- 


6,634.94 


Iowa - . 


10.4.54.57 


Kansas . . 


9,443.88 


Kentucky 


3,061.02 


Louisiana . -. 


4,448.20 


Maine 


2,109.66 



AMERICAN RAILWAY EXPRESS COMPANY 
MILEAGE BY STATES AND TEBR\JOR\ES— Continued 



255 



State or Territory 


Total Mileage 
1920 


Total Mileage 
1921 




2,810.00 
2,066.17 
7,929.05 
8,274.30 
4,018.20 
8,095.49 
4,937.18 
6,174.20 
2,104.47 
1,210.22 
2.190.98 
2,849.18 
8.387.92 
4.493.65 
5,250.08 
9.442.63 
6,386.07 
3,255.64 
9,538.49 

213.50 
3,. 348. 80 
4.254.03 
3,581.28 
15.844.91 
2.079.79 

931.73 
4.854.25 
6.292.44 
2,640.00 
7,009.91 
1,842.04 


2,767.00 


Massachusetts 


2,066.17 
7,925.58 




8,274.30 




3.134.92 


Missouri 


8,066.52 


Montana 


4.937.18 


Nebraska 


6.174.20 


Nevada 


2,125.77 


New Hampshire 


1.193.86 
2,190.98 




2.849.18 




8.383.48 


North Carolina 

North Dakota .- 


3.065.09 
5.248.58 


Ohio 


9,405.63 


Oklahoma 


6,433.24 


Oregon 


3,269.14 


Pennsylvania 


9,515.78 


Rhode Island 

South Carohna 

South Dakota 


213.50 
2.320.30 
4,254.03 




2.540.18 


Texas 


15.864.84 


Utah 


2.083.47 




929.94 


Virginia.. 


3.974.90 


Washington 


6.294.74 


West Virginia 


2,640.00 


Wisconsin 


7,080.11 


Wyoming 


1.886.54 






Total, United States 


245,592.02 


236.187.78 






British Columbia ^ ... . _. 


432.40 
310.56 
958.62 
285.96 
669.00 
44.80 
20,355.00 


422.60 


Manitoba... .. .. .. 


310.56 


Ontario . 


958.62 


Quebec . . 


249.80 




669.00 




94.23 


Other coast-wise and trans-oceanic li nes 


19,066.00 




23.056.34 


21,791.11 


Grand total 


269.648.36 


257,9.58.89 







256 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

MILEAGE NOT ASSIGNABLE TO STATES OR TERRITORIES 



Name of Line 


Mileage 1920 


Mileage 1921 


Alaska Steamship Company '__ 


5,017.00 

997.00 

332.00 

50.00 

192.00 

49.00 

666.00 

2,389.00 

6,081.00 

87.00 

103.00 


5,017.00 
997.00 


Chesapeake Steamship Company 




Eastern Steamship Lines 




Inter-Island Steam Navigation Company . 




Maine Central Steamers __ .... 




New England Navigation Company . . . 




Northern Commercial Company 

Pacific Steamship Company 


2,389.00 
6 081 00 




87.00 


Union Pacific Steamers. . 






103.00 








Total 


15,963.00 


14 674 00 






Recapitulation 

Class of Carrier 
Steam roads 


237,699.45 
2,992.12 
16,301.62 
7,064.50 
4,392.00 
193.42 
5.25 


227 922 69 


Electric Lines 


3,172.81 
12,598.50 




9,382.92 


Trans-oceanic steamship lines 

Stage lines --_. , ... .___ 


4,392.00 
483.72 




6.25 






Total 


268,648.36 


257,958.89 



OPERATING REVENUES 



Account 


Amount of 
Revenue For 
the Year 1920 


Amount of 
Revenue For 
the Year 1921 


I. Transportation: 


$ 333,878.245.71 
11.780.25 


$ 294,659,525.51 


Miscellaneous 


4,061.95 




$ 333,890,025.96 


$ 294,663,587.46 






II. Contract Payments: 


$ 141,829,491.38 


$ 113,490,661.91 








$ 192,060 534.58 


$ 181,172,925.55 






III. Operations Other Than Transportation 


$ 211,093.78 

6,347.00 

445,031.30 

2,196,029.07 

7,862.77 

738,145.08 


$ 214,692.09 




3,540.73 


Rents of buildings and other property 

C. 0. D. checks 


450.534.45 

2.341,317.78 

16,538.11 




697,213.25 






Total other than transportation 


$ 3,604,509.00 


$ 3,723,836.41 


Total operating revenues 


$ 195,665,043.58 


$ 184,896,761.96 



AMERICAN RAILWAY EXPRESS COMPANY 



257 



OPERATING EXPENSES 



Account 



For Year 1920 



For Year 1921 



-repairs 

-depreciation 
-retirements.. 



, Maintenance: 

Superintendence 

Buildings and appurtenances- 
Buildings and appurtenances- 
Buildings and appurtenances- 
Cars — repairs 

Cars — depreciation 

Cars — retirements 

Horses — depreciation 

H orses — retirements 

Automobiles— repairs 

Automobiles— depreciation 

Automobiles — retirements 

Wagons and sleighs — repairs 

Wagons and sleighs — depreciation 

Wagons and sleighs — retirements 

Harness equipment— repairs 

Harness equipment— depreciation and retirements 

Office furniture and equipment — repairs 

Office furniture and equipment — depreciation and retirements 

Office safes— repairs 

Office safes — depreciation and retirements 

Trucks — repairs 

Trucks — depreciation and retirements 

Stable and garage equipment — repairs 

Stable and garage equipment — depreciation and retirements. , 

Line equipment — repairs 

Line equipment — depreciation and retirements 

Shop equipment — repairs 

Shop equipment — depreciation and retirements 

Miscellaneous equipment — repairs 

Miscellaneous equipment — depreciation and retirements 

Other expenses 



238,085.76 
448,256.12 
383,619.19 
6,080.83 
200,324.98 
55,905.12 



Total maintenance. 



II. Traffic: 

Superintendence 

Advertising . 

Stationery and printing. 
Other expenses 



584, 

203 

3,354 

924 

12 



197 
27 

321 
91 

218 

369 
20 
29 



,925.30 
,085.37 
,730.27 
,172.15 
,134.33 
,803.31 
,651.24 
,755.55 
,416.74 
,665.24 
,279.78 
,999.63 
,180.44 
,490.74 
,625.25 
,361.59 
,170.60 
,892.43 
,788.51 
,697.67 
,189.34 
,157.95 
464.33 
,284.31 
39.00 



229, 
278, 
404, 
9, 
168, 
55, 



183, 
2,998, 

733 

17 

1,954 

200, 
36 

237 
89 

193 

357 
18 
32 

570, 

196 
10, 
17, 
47 
49, 



753.24 
301.99 
050.73 
899.41 
699.19 
913.32 
775.20 
025.44 
362.41 
804.06 
784.75 
317.83 
115.80 
947.07 
318.86 
780. 16 
586.00 
679.50 
271.53 
814.07 
894.98 
694.66 
645.87 
800.68 
524.32 
751.53 
539.91 
879.27 
554.54 

78.58 
211.56 

80.00 



$ 10,643,533.07 


$ 


9,627,856.46 


$ 132,960.74 

28,600.75 

142,698.22 

128.98 


1 


159,342.52 

40,118.73 

222,380.49 

107.25 



Total traffic . 



304,; 



.69 



421, 



258 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



OPERATING EXPENSES— Conhnued 



Account 



III. Transportation: 

Superintendence — transportation 

Office employees 

Commissions 

Office supplies and expenses 

Rent of local offices -. -_ 

Vehicle employees 

Stable and garage employees 

Stable and garage supplies and expenses _ 

Dray age 

Train employees 

Train supplies and expenses 

Stationery and printing 

Loss and damage 

Damage to property 

Injuries to persons 

Other expenses 



Total — transportation . 



IV. General: 

Salaries and expenses of general officers 

Salaries and expenses of clerks and attendants . 

General office supplies and expenses 

Law expenses 

Insurance 

Fidelity bond premiums 

Pensions 

Stationery and printing. 

Other expenses 



Total — general . 



Recapitulation : 

I. Maintenance 

II. Traffic 

III. Transportation 

IV. General 



Total operating expenses 

Ratio of operating expenses to operating revenues. 



For Year 1920 For Year 1921 



6,584, 
80,009, 
13,607, 

3,872, 

3,802, 
34,964 

3,851 
10,214 

5,019 

14,522 

785 

4,325 

29.838 

131 

3,286 
416 



988.26 
827.50 
727.11 
018.52 
,282.76 
,957.95 
,446.42 
,281.10 
,390.51 
,207.60 
,849.44 
,942.59 
,919.42 
,556.72 
,120.15 
,329.76 



$ 215,503,845.81 



330,400.02 
,894,030.58 
311,402.10 
264,769.53 
668,670.25 
6,119.83 
372,705.27 
336,463.98 
173,210.76 



8,357,772.37 



$ 10,643,533.07 

304,388.69 

215,503,845.81 

8,357,772.37 



$ 234,809,539.94 



120.01 



6,100, 

61,568, 

11,567, 

3.547, 

4.883, 

30,649, 

3,684. 

7,452 

1,984 

12,508 

1,199 

2,742 

10,706 

104 

1,500 

274 



704.79 
896.93 
,099.66 
,109.19 
,005.72 
,814.88 
,837.59 
,120.20 
,177.51 
,906.88 
,940.96 
,827.88 
,385.43 
,769.18 
,000.00 
,971.90 



,475,568.70 



377,074.74 

9.280,103.59 

540,803.03 

234,449.02 

527,982.99 

5,165.20 

413.738.85 

320,273.77 

40,317.94 

11,739,909.13 



I 9,627,856.46 

421,948.99 

160,475,568.70 

11,739,909.13 



$ 182,265,283.28 



98.58 



AMERICAN RAILWAY EXPRESS COMPANY 



259 



COMPARATIVE GENERAL BALANCE SHEET 



Balance at 

Beginning of 

Year 1920 



Assets 



Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1920 



Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1921 



$ 33,284,724.07 

1,059,500.00 
12,000,000.00 
2,000,243.00 



$ 


48,344,467.07 


$ 


30,210,741.86 




85,076.50 




2,327.82 




239,354.75 




8,483,958.45 




18,579,049.60 




1,473,124.02 




126,621.44 




36,767.69 


$ 


59,237,022.13 


$ 


345,932.53 




67,902.39 




199,576.81 


$ 


613,411.73 



194,900.93 



Investment: 

Real property and equipment 

Notes (U. S. Treasury) 

Bonds 

U.S. Certificate of Indebtedness 
Time deposits 



S 34,691, 



).24 



1,032,500.00 
12,100,299.55 



Total investment . 



$ 47,823,998.79 



35,639,687.67 
9,900,000.00 
1.142,226.50 

10,901,888.75 
964.00 

57,584,766.92 



Current Assets: 

Cash 

Special deposits 

Loans and notes receivable 

Traffic balances receivable 

Net balances receivable from agents and 

messengers 

Miscellaneous accounts receivable 

Material and supplies 

Interest, dividends, and rents receivable 

Working fund advances 



$ 18,218,104.31 

85,076.50 

3,002,952.50 

3,488.23 

8,575,776.81 

14,465,340.03 

2,806,507.02 

286,469.61 

47,265.00 



,492,989.62 

457.00 

5,643.00 

198,398.21 

,860,570.39 
,807,582.60 
,134,328.66 
203,620.17 
32,365.00 



Total current assets . 



$ 47,490, 



1.01 



$ 35,735,954.65 



Unadjusted Debits: 
Rents and insurance premiums paid in advance 

Taxes paid in advance 

Other unadj usted debits 



481,421.86 

111,430.95 

1,399,466.39 



421,567.28 

94,989.59 

1,391,912.15 



Total unadjusted debits. 
Grand total 



% 1,992,319.20 



,469.02 



$ 97,307,298.00 



$ 95,229,190.59 



260 



N. C. CORPOEATION COMMISSION 



COMPARATIVE GENERAL BALANCE SHEET 



Balance at 

Beginning of 

Year 1920 



LlABILITJ^LS 



Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1920 



Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1921 



$ 34,642,109.64 



$ 34,642,109.64 



$ 223,571.95 

5,983,761.59 

5,555,296.89 

37,158,558.62 

1,097,674.65 



4,496,028.45 



$ 54,514,892.15 



51,999.47 



51,999.47 



$ 15,110,813.11 

539,830.28 

3,240,429.71 

94,826.57 



18,985,899.67 



1,194,900.93 



Stock : 
Capital stock . 



$ 34,642,000.00 



$ 34,642,000.00 



Total stock liabilities . 



$ 34,642,000.00 



$34,642,000.00 



Current Liabilities: 

Traffic balances payable 

Audited accounts and wages unpaid 

Miscellaneous accounts payable 

Express privilege liabilities 

Estimated tax liability 

Unmatured interest, dividends, and rents 

payable 

Other current liabilities 



$ 311,343.12 

5,075,276 24 

3,478,657.38 

11,602,266.61 

532,929.43 



5,779,1 



508,179.57 
5,538,290.70 

277,884.82 
16,519,340.40 

956,867.40 

71,730.00 
4,097,465.57 



Total current liabilities . 



Deferred Liabilities: 
Other deferred liabilities 



Total deferred habilities 



$ 26,780,371.66 


$ 


27,969,758.46 


$ 36,705.47 


$ 


15,293.87 


$ 36,705.47 


$ 


15,293.87 



Unadjusted Credits: 
Operating and insurance reserves . 
Accrued depreciation— buildings,. 
Accrued depreciation — equipment. 
Other unadj usted credits 



$ 27,609,546.27 

914,358.26 

5,519,209.89 

419,278.23 



$ 22,106,845.29 

1,294,461.10 

7,282,933.33 

399,658.66 



Total unadjusted credits. 



$ 34,462,392.65 



$ 31,083,898.38 



Corporate Surplus: 
Profit and loss balance . 



$ 1,385,828.22 



1,518,239.88 



Total corporate surplus. 
Grand total 



1,385,828.22 



1,518,239.! 



% 97,307,298.00 



$ 95,229.190.59 



I 



SOUTHEASTERN EXPRESS COMPANY 



261 



Southeastern Express Company 

For Year Ended December 31, 1921 
PRINCIPAL OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Officia' Address 


President 

Vice-President 

Secretary and Treasurer 

General Counsel 


Jno. B. Hockaday 

Chas. A. Lyerly 

F. W. Woods 

Sanders McDaniel 

A. T. Perry 


Atlanta, Ga. 
Chattanooga, Tenn. 
Atlanta, Ga. 
Atlanta, Ga. 




Atlanta, Ga. 


General Man ager 

Traffic Manager 

Assistant Traffic Manager 


J. E. Skaggs 

G. H. Kerr 

J. H. Barrett 


Atlanta, Ga. 
Atlanta, Ga. 
Atlanta, Ga. 



DIRECTORS 

Chas. A. Lyerly, Chattanooga, Tenn.; Robt. F. Maddox, Atlanta, Ga.; John B. Hockaday, Atlan- 
ta, Ga.; Geo. L. Baker, Columbia, S. C; H. C. Armstrong, Selma, Ala. 



MILEAGE BY STATES AND TERRITORIES 



State or Territory 


Steam Road 
Mileage 




1,596.85 


Florida _ _ _ _ 


194.17 




1,308.88 


Illinois 


318.86 


Indiana 


236.03 


Kentucky 


364.56 


Louisiana 


40.58 


Maryland 


281.87 


Mississippi 


771.78 


North Carolina 


1,490.0/ 


Ohio 


1.80 


Pennsylvania 


35.70 


South Carolina 


1 194 80 


Tennessee 


1 031 01 


Virginia 


1 328 88 


District of Columbia 


4.15 








Total 


10 199 99 








Recapitulation: 
Steam road 


9,5<j0.27 


Electric lines . . . 


^10.72 


Inland steamboat hnes 


569.00 








Total 


10,199.99 







262 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



OPERATING REVENUES 



I. Transportation: 

Express — domestic 

Miscellaneous 

Total transportation 

II. Contract Payments: 

Express privileges — Dr. 

Revenue from transportation 

III. Operations Other Than Transportation: 

Customs brokerage fees 

Rents of buildings and other property 

C. O. D. checks 

Total other than transportation 

Total operating revenues 



Amount of 

Revenue for 

the Year 



$ 4,374,018.00 
.50 



$ 


4,374,018.50 


$ 


1.649,332.11 


$ 


2,724,686.39 



$ 13.44 

631.00 

55,555.85 



56,200.29 



2,780,f 



OPERATING EXPENSES 



I. Maintenance: 

Buildings and appurtenances — repairs 

Buildings and appurtenances — depreciation 

Horses — depreciation 

Horses — retirements 

Autom obiles — repairs 

Automobiles — depreciation l. 

Wagons and sleighs — repairs 

Wagons and sleighs — depreciation 

Harness equipment — repairs 

Harness equipment — depreciation and retirements 

Office furniture and equipment — repa rs 

Office furniture and equipment — depreciation and retirements 

Office safes — repairs 

Office safes — depreciation and retirements 

Trucks — repairs 

Trucks — depreciation and retirements 

Stable and garage equipment — repairs 

Stable and garage equipment — depreciation and retirements. 

Line equipment — repairs 

Line equipment — depreciation and retirements 

Miscellaneous equipment — repairs 

Ot her expenses 

Total maintenanre 



Amount of 
Operating Ex- 
penses for 
the Year 



$ 


2.084.95 




3,518.51 




4,089.13 




1,001.56 




9,169.03 




38,324.55 




6.285.21 




5, 69.39 




830.65 




661.60 




797.68 




1,783.37 




443.47 




365.30 




9,821.58 




3,731.16 




41.52 




178.16 




947.07 




290.50 




8.59 




16.45 



.t, 759. 43 



SOUTHEASTERN EXPRESS COMPANY 
OPERATING EXPEHSES-Continued 



263 



Account 



II. Traffic: 

Superin endence — traffic 

Advertising 

Stationery and printing 

Other expenses 

Total— traffic -_ . 

III. Transportation: 

Superintendence — transport ati on 

Office employees 

Commissions 

Office supplies and expenses 

Rent of local offices 

Vehicle employees 

Stable and garage employees 

Stable and garage supplies and expenses 

Drayage 

Train employees 

Train supplies and expenses 

Stationery and printing 

Loss and damage 

Damage to property 

Injuries to persons 

Other expenses 

Total — transportation 

IV. General: 

Salaries and expenses of general officers 

Salaries and expenses of clerks and attendants 

General office supplies and expenses 

Law £ xpenses 

Insurance 

Fidelity bond premiums 

Stationery and printing 

Other expenses 

Total — general 

Recapitulation: 

I. Maintenance 

II. Traffic 

III . Transportation 

IV. General 

Total operating expenses 



Amount of 
Operating Ex- 
penses for 
the Year 



13,209.21 

7,930.15 

22, 366.. 58 

57.18 



$ 43,563.12 


$ 106,179.07 


884,199.42 


279,357.06 


55,310.81 


81,250.03 


324,040.08 


7,056.30 


116,177.94 


5,713.37 


356.092,64 


7,056.76 


123,121.76 


90,543.31 


1 373.79 


2,268.28 


82.31 


$ 2,439,822.93 


$ 22,571.82 


71,561.78 


2,848.40 


8,018.93 


24,657.90 


3,425.02 


12,526.45 


706.72 


1 146,317.02 


$ 89,759.43 


43,563.12 


2,439,822.93 


146,317.02 



2,719.462.50 



Ratio of operating expenses to operating revenues, 97.79 per cent. 



264 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 
COMPARATIVE GENERAL BALANCE SHEET— ASSET SIDE 



Item 




Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1921 


Investment: 
Real property and equipment. .. . . 


$ 


1 048 644 51 








$ 


1 048 644 51 






Current Assets: 
Cash 


$ 


635.032.14 




76 406.89 




50,083.34 




41,534.27 








8 


803,056.64 






Unadjusted Debits: 


$ 


12,326.33 




10.00 






Total unadjusted debits 


$ 


12,336.33 




$ 


1,864,037.48 







COMPARATIVE BALANCE SHEET— LI ABILITY SIDE 



Item 



Stock: 
Capital stock 

Total stock liabilities 

Current Liabilities: 

Loans and notes payable 

Traffic balances payable 

Audited accounts and wages unpaid 

Miscellaneous accounts payable 

Express privilege liabilities 

Estimated tax liability 

Unmatured interest, dividends, and rents payable 

Total current liabilities 

Unadjusted Credits: 

Operating and insurance reserves 

Accrued depreciation— buildings 

Accrued depreciation— equipment 

Other unadjusted credits 

Total unadjusted credits 

Grand total 

*Discrepancy original report, $46,700. 



Balance At 

Close of Year 

1921 



1,000,0 0.00 



1.000,000.00 



12,069.08 

78,759.49 

200,881.40 

244,367.14 

174,764.60 

3,492.02 

46,700.00 



761,033.73 



$ 44,492.51 

3,518.61 

54,785.46 

*46,907.17 



$ 103,003.75 

$ 1,864,037.48 



THE PULLMAN COMPANY 



265 



THE PULLMAN COMPANY 



OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Addresc 


President 

S CT3 ary 

General Counsel 


E. F. Carry 

J. F. Kane 

G. S. Fernald 


Chicago, 111. 
Chicago, 111. 
Chicago, 111. 



PROPERTY OPERATED 



Total length of main lines of railroads over which its cars are run 

(miles) 

Mileage in North Carolina 



1920 



203,718.00 
1,854.00 



1 6.322.00 
1,913.14 



CAPITAL STOCK 



Capital stock. 



1920 



S 120,000,000.00 



1921 



% 120,000,000.00 



— 28 



266 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



POSTAL TELEGRAPH -CABLE COMPANY 



OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 






New York N Y 


Vice-President and General Manager 


Edward Reynolds 


New York N Y 


Vice-President 


E. C. Piatt 


New York N Y 


Treasurer 


E. C. Piatt 


New York N Y 


Assistant Treasurer 


Joseph J. Cardona 


New York N Y 


Assistant Treasurer 


Robert J. Hall 


New York N Y 


Assistant Treasurer 


Milton W. Blackmar 

William B. Dunn 


New York N Y 


Secretary 


New York N Y 









RECEIPTS IN NORTH CAROLINA 





1920 


1921 


Commerci al telegraph tolls— interstate 

Local telegraph tolls— interstate 


$ 77,576.09 

70,065.78 

33,033.72 

1,062.10 

457.32 

402.01 

1,770.84 

1,631.78 

1,191.80 

1,780.87 

7,686.71 

1,172.38 

958.76 

18.00 

680. 12 

4,724.53 

3,156.72 

72.29 

500.89 

594.00 


$ 199,344.60 
37 697 07 


Government telegraph tolls — interstate . .. 




Local telegraph tolls — interstate .. - . 




Government telegraph tolls — intrastate 




Press telegraph tolls— interstate 




Local telegraph tolls— interstate 

Press telegraph tolls — intrastate 




Other telegraph transmission revenue 

Stock and commercial news 


1,596.84 
12 178 84 


Money transfer tolls . 


3,307.59 


Money transfer premiums 




Messenger service 

Telegraph tolls on cable messages 

Telephone receipts— interstate 


5.. 50 
1,034.02 








9,471.25 




2,184.35 




593.00 






Total 


$ 208,536.70 

- 


$ 267,416.06 



POSTAL TELEGRAPH-CABLE COMPANY 



267 



EXPENSES IN NORTH CAROLINA 



1921 



Testing and regulating 

Supervision of operations 

Wages— operators 

Wages— bookkeepers and clerks 

Commission 

Messenger services expenses 

Telephone service 

Rents of telegraph offices 

Miscellaneous expenses 

Stationery and printing 

Operating power 

Advertising 

Traffic damages 

Accidents and damages 

Law expenses connected with damages- 
Repairs of office equipment 

General law expenses 

Minor rents for property 

Salaries of general officers 

Salaries of general office clerks 

Expenses of general officers and clerks . 

General printing and stationery 

Other general office expenses 

Plant supervision expenses 

Supervision of maintenance 

Engineering expenses 

Repairs of aerial plant 

Motor vehicle expense 

Repairs of underground plant 

Other operating expenses 

Bad customers 

Pensions and relief 

Taxes 

Supply store — salaries and expenses 



187.60 

32,650.66 

37,346.66 

21,303.12 

7,694.53 

24,559.01 

1,779.16 

13,994.36 

3,834.31 

1,389.46 

1,292.27 



249.69 

357.60 
1,341.98 

297.03 
1,177.83 
1,617.84 
1,502.04 

260.59 



219.21 
645.68 
948.88 
33,872.95 
553.30 



2,970.12 
1,000.00 

597.07 
4,928.24 

121.43 



11.00 

33,540.96 

32,817.85 

17,508.35 

6,865.39 

21,935.78 

2,054.04 

15,078.56 

4,045.11 

1,467.08 

1,270.58 

175. 18 

317.45 

1,386.00 

798.81 

1,316.70 

79.13 

1,797.90 

1,647.44 

1,888.03 

300.13 

45.88 

1,091.15 

323.48 

642.88 

960.06 

36,456.35 

631.28 

65.43 

2,982.51 

1,454.00 

174.61 

1,377.15 



Total. 



199,549.56 



192,506.25 



268 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



WESTERN UNION TELEGRAPH COMPANY 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President 

District Commercial Supt. of N. C. 


Newcomb Carlton 

W. G Sale 


195 Broadway, New Y ork 

N. Y. 
Richmond, Va 


District Plant Supt. of N. C 


L. H.Beck 


Atlanta, Ga. 



PROPERTY OPERATED 



United States, under the high seas, and foreign countries (miles) 

Total length of wire in North Carolina (miles) 

Miles of pole-line and cables in North Carolina 




1921 



1,521,862 
25,467 
3,214 



CAPITAL STOCK 



Capital stock. 



1920-1921 



$ 99,817,100.00 



RECEIPTS IN NORTH CAROLINA 





1920 


1921 


Receipts from business wholly within North Carolina 

Receipts from state of North Carolina for interstate and miscel- 
laneous business 


$ 326,437.29 
954,184.19 


$ 300,106.49 
863,505.59 







WESTERN UNION TELEGRAPH COMPANY 



269 



EXPENSES IN NORTH CAROLINA 



Supervision 

Managers, operators, office and operating aids 

Clerks and office boys 

Other employees 

Messenger service 

Rent, light, and fuel 

Testing and regulating 

Telephone rentals 

Operators' schooling 

Operati ng power 

Miscellaneous 

Taxes 

Federal income taxes apportionable to North Carolina 

Legal expenses and damage claims 

Pro rata division expenses 

Pro rata expenses, general executive offices, employees, rent, etc. 
Depreci ation 



TotaL 



1920 



30,492.40 
129,598.07 
73,436.29 
3,536.02 
83,670.83 
31,828.73 



,853.47 



1,066.31 
45,604.78 
28,318.02 

5,066.47 

11,979.02 

372,681.00 

36,953.17 

88,844.86 



951,929.44 



1921 



48,903.69 

241,430.30 

65,749.51 

7,931.08 

58,968.48 

40,040.72 

52,663.97 

4,907.04 

8,964.83 

5,064.35 

4,554.38 

33,010.87 

4,603.55 

12,495.00 

86,080.43 

38,281.99 

87,996.28 



801,646.47 



270 



N. C. COBPORATION COMMISSION 



REPORT OF STREET 



FOR CALENDAR 



Name of Company 


Address 


Estimated Value 
Plant and 
Equipment 


Operating 
Revenues 


Alamance Railway Co. 


Burhngton, N. C 

Asheville, N. C 

Raleigh, N. C 

Durham, N. C. 


$ 60,000.00 
*2, 127,392.00 
*1, 017, 042. 00 
♦1,034,000.00 


$ 27,885.63 


Asheville Light and Power Co. 


376,558.02 


CaroUna Light and Power Co 


165,543.65 
154,947.12 


New Bern-Ghent Street Ry. 


New Bern, N. C. 


18,626.82 


North Carolina Public Service Co. 


Greensboro, N. C. 




204,336.21 


Salisbury and Spencer Railway Co 

Southern Public Utilities Co. 


Salisbury, N. C 

Charlotte, N. C. 




78,469.55 
435,842.84 


Southern Public Utilities Co 


Winston-Salem, N. C... 
Wilmington, N. C 


506,840.00 


250,355.08 


Tidewater Power Co 


401,598.98 











FOR 



Name of Company 


Address 


Estimated Value 
Plant and 
Equipment 


Operating 
Revenues 




Burhngton, N. C 

Asheville, N. C 

Raleigh, N. C 

Durham, N. C 

New Bern, N. C 

Greensboro, N. C 

Salisbury, N. C 

Charlotte, N. C 

Winston-Salem, N. C.-. 
Wilmington, N. C 


$ 60,000.00 

*2, 146,314.00 

*1, 044, 684.00 

*864,410.00 

30,000.00 

2,000,000.00 

400,000.00 

3,000,000.00 

506,840.00 

3,000,000.00 


$ 30,395.99 




416,962.80 


Carolina Light and Power Co 


183,381.79 
163,607.29 


New Bern-Ghent Street Ry. 


15,406.43 


North Carolina Public Service Co 

Salisbury and Spencer Railway Co 

Southern Public Utihties Co. 


217,664.79 

80,342.23 

512,127.69 


Southern Pubhc Utihties Co 

Tidewater Power Co 


268,647.11 

474,587.42 



*Figures based on reproduction cost. 
(D)— Deficit. 



STREET RAILWAY UTILITIES 



271 



RAILWAY UTILITIES 

YEAR 1920 




Operating 
Expenses 


Gain 


Miles of 

Track 

Operated 


Passengers 
Carried 


Passengers 

Carried per Mile 

of Track 


Number of 
Car Miles Run 


S 31,447.31 


$ (D) 1,051.32 


8.80 


316,403 


35,955 


151,537 


273,784.45 


143,178.35 


19.20 


6,957,953 


362,393 


993,223 


130,781.99 


52,599.80 


13.82 


3,262,823 


236,090 


538,782 


152,081.94 


11,525.35 


11.91 


2,521,950 


211,750 


724,707 


14,290.46 


1,115.97 


3.66 


301,108 


75,277 




140,691.53 


76,973.26 


18.50 


3,636,045 


196,543 


777,718 


57,633.99 


22,708.24 


9.71 


1,287.500 


132,595 


253,762 


460,408.11 


51,719.58 


26.75 


9,451,348 


351,351 


1,695,284 


212,258.94 


56,388.17 


9.94 


4,630,610 


521,465 


657,987 


445,152.85 


29,434.57 


33.20 

















272 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



REPORT OF ELECTRIC 



FOR CALENDAR 



Name of Company 


Address 


Revenue From 
Operations 


Revenue From 
Other Sources 


Asheville Power and Light Co. 


Asheville, N. C 

Bakersville, N. C 

Hendersonville, N. C... 
Brevard, N. C. 


$ 871,358.92 
3,885.00 
191,138.24 
16,268.61. 
13,757.06 
5,486.94 
32,184.80 




Bakersville Milling Light and Power Co. 




Blue Ridge Power Co. 


$ 21.00 


Brevard Light and Power Co. — 




Buffalo Power Co. 


Lenoir, N. C. 




Burnsville Electric Company 


Burnsville, N. C 

Canton, N. C. 




Canton Electric Company 






Wilmington, N. C. 






Maxton, N. C. 


14,614.36 

1,791,711.46 

5,488.00 

34,466.85 


482.60 




Raleigh, N. C. 


217,160.40 


Cascade Power Company= 

Catawba Valley Light and Power Co. 


Brevard, N. C. 




Morganton, N. C 

Lenoir, N. C. 




Citizens Light and Power Company... 
Connelly Springs Light and Power Co. 

Conover Electric Company 

Dallas Rural Light Co. 




Connelly Springs, N. C. 

Conover, N. C 

Dallas, N. C. 


402.50 

5,263.33 

145.69 








Dillsboro and Sylva Elec. Light Co. 


Dillsboro, N. C. 




Duplin Light and Power Co 


Wallace, N. C. 






Durham Public Service Co 


Durham, N. C 

Elizabeth City, N. C. _ _ 

Elk Park, N. C 

Elon College, N. C 

Franklin, N. C. 


604,354.12 
101,734.47 
1,245.65 
94,981.14 
11,834.25 
12,342.48 
12,014.20 
11,544.40 
18,139.65 


35,893.97 


Electric Light Co. of EHzabeth City 

Elk Park Elec. Light and Power Co. ... 

Elon College Electric Light Co 

Franklin Light and Power Co.= 






10,800.00 


Franklinton, N. C 

Hillsboro, N. C. 




Hillsboro Light and Power Co 


2.00 


Home Electric Company 

Laurinburg Light and Power Co 

Laurel Hill Electric Co 


Hendersonville, N.C 

Laurinburg, N. C 

Laurel Hill, N. C. 




222.50 


Leaksville Light and Power Co 

Madison Light and Power Co 


Leaksville, N.C 

Marshall, N. C. 


32,265.82 






Marion Light and Power Co 


Marion, N C 


13,971.08 
2,949.61 






Moravian Falls, N. C... 
Murphy, N C. 




Murphy Light and Power Co 




Newland Light and Power Co 


Newland, N.C 

NorHna, N C 


3,458.25 




Norhna Electric Light Co 

North Carolina Electrical Power Co 




Asheville, N C 


257,704.09 

1,165,886.59 

6,963.25 

578,261.39 


535.82 




Greensboro, N. C 

Norwood, N. C 

Raleigh, N.C 

Warrenton N C 




Norwood Power and Light Co 

Palmetto Power and Light Co 

Peck Manufacturing Company 

Piedmont Power and Light Co 

Public Service Company 

Roanoke Rapids Power Co 

Roseboro Light and Power Co 

Roxboro Light and Power Co 

St. Paul Power Co 

Sampson Power Company 

Sharpsburg Light and Power Co 

Smitherman Power Company 

Southern Power Company 

Southern Public Utihties Co 




99,098.30 


BurUngton, N. C 

Hayesville, N.C 

Roanoke Rapids, N. C. 

Roseboro, N. C 

Roxboro, N C 


207,876.97 

1,800.00 

139,559.20 

1,560.00 

21,056.08 

71,371.60 

29,880.73 

1,043.63 

187,451.46 

5,064.338.61 

1,294,747.52 






12,565.24 




St. Paul, N.C 

Clinton, N. C 

Sharpsburg, N. C 

Troy, N.C 

Charlotte, N. C 

Charlotte, N. C 








1,449.71 
3,428.61 
28.877.21 



ELECTRIC LIGHT COMPANIES 



273 



LIGHT COMPANIES 

YEAR 1921 



Total 
Revenue 


Operating 
Expenses 


Taxes 


Rentals 


Total 
Expenses 


Net 
Income 


$ 871,358.92 

3,885.00 

191,159.24 

16,268.61 

13,757.06 


1 485,404.52 

3,300.00 

168,040.25 

14,469.81 

11,142.50 

7,485.59 

24,734.53 


1 73,850.63 
222.00 
10,604.61 
634. 14 
327.20 
169.58 
1,096.59 


$ 382.50 
15.00 
180.00 


1 559,637.65 
3,537.00 
178,824.86 
15,103.95 
11,469.70 
7,655.17 
26,263.43 


$ 311,721.27 

348.00 

12,334.38 

1,164.66 

2,287.36 


5,486.94 




D2, 168.23 


32,184.80 


432.31 


5,921.37 


15,096.96 

2,008,871.86 

5,488.00 


10,807.22 

1,187,188.05 

4,406.35 

12,476.29 


298.83 

142,794.75 

318.81 

2,527.21 


750.00 
315,347.76 


11,856.05 

1,329,982.80 

4,725.16 

15,110.00 


3,240.91 

°678, 889.06 

762.84 


34,466.85 


106.50 


19,356.85 


402.50 
5,263.33 


30.00 

4,973.02 

126.40 


32.50 
84.38 
10.00 


15.00 


77.50 

5,057.40 

136.40 


325.00 
205.93 


145.69 




9.29 




















640,248.09 

101,734.47 

1,245.65 

105,781.14 


481,278.60 

88,420.90 

1,245.65 

107,899.16 

9,221.08 

10,474.15 

7,883.81 

6,455.56 

4,823.74 


32,612.55 

4,281.82 

41.34 


3,617.77 
210.00 


517,508.92 

92,912.72 

1,286.99 

107,899.16 

9,638.53 

10,950.40 

8,237.51 

6,655.56 

7,390.29 


122,739.17 

8,821.75 

D41.34 

D2, 118.02 


11,834.25 
12,342.48 


274.95 
476.25 
248.70 
200.00 
2,566.55 


142.50 


2,195.72 
1,392.08 


12.016.20 
11,544.40 


105.00 


3,778.69 
4,888.84 


18,362.15 




10,971.86 


32.265.82 


25,814.14 


643.28 


195.68 


26,653.10 


5,612.72 


13,971.08 
2,949.61 


8,676.17 
2,247.88 


622.29 
146.36 


340.00 


9,638.46 
2,394.24 


4,332.62 
555.37 








3,458.25 


2,986.30 


108.98 




3,095.28 


362.97 


258,239.91 

1,165,886.59 

6,963.25 


159,079.04 

794,613.28 

5,323.90 

353,585.66 


14,400.00 
20,395.04 

84.97 
49,281.43 


300.00 
6,649.46 


173,779.04 

821,657.78 

5,408.87 

402,867.09 


t84,460.87 

♦344,228.81 

1,554.38 


677,359.69 




X274,492.60 


12,044.21 






207,876.97 


195,997.87 

2,210.00 

122,477.23 

989.00 

15,779.82 

60,736.26 

26,372.54 

777.87 

165,659.48 

3,619,483.38 

810.432.88 


6,750.00 

127.00 

14,373.97 

45.00 

940.49 

1,852.14 




202,747.87 

2,337.00 

136,851.20 

1,034.00 

16,930.31 

62,588.40 

26,372.54 

851.79 

168,177.47 

3,886,693.84 

911,371.00 


5,129.10 


1,800.00 




D537.00 


152,124.44 




15,273.23 


1,560.00 
21,056.08 
71,371.60 

29,880.73 


210.00 


526.00 

4,125.77 

8,783.20 

A3, 508. 19 


1,043.63 

188,901.17 

5,067,767.22 

1,323,624.73 


73.92 

2,517.99 

264,025.85 

94,814.28 


3,184.61 
6,123.84 


191.84 

20,723.70 

1,181,073.38 

412,253.73 



274 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



REPORT OF ELECTRIC 
FOR CALENDAR 



Name of Company 


Address 


Revenue From 
Operations 


Revenue From 
Other Sources 


Tallassee Power Company 


Badin, N. C 

Wilmington, N. C 

Troutman, N. C 

Warren Plains, N. C 

Weaverville, N. C. 


S 20,468.21 

452,799.09 

1,523.39 

487.85 




Tidewater Power Company 

Troutman I^ight and Power Co. 


$ 547,660.57 


Warren Plains Electric Company 

Weaverville Electric and Tel. Co. 


329.00 


Yadkin Power Company 


Raleigh, N.C 


1,160,368.30 


18,016.64 



— This figure includes interest and depreciation to the amount of $315,347.76. 
t — This figure includes depreciation to the amount of $42,110.62. 

* —This figure includes bond interest, bad debts, and depreciation to the amount of $347,785.48. 
A — This figure includes $1,500.00 depreciation. 

B —This figure includes interest and depreciation in the sum of $323,790.21. 
D — Denotes deficit. 

X — This amount includes interest and amortization of bond discount in the sum of $216,059.95. 
= —Figures given are for year ended December 31, 1921. 
g —General expenses. 

h — Figures given are for year ended May 31, 1922. This company sells power at wholesale to towns 
of Norlina and Warrenton for retailing. 



REPORT OF 

FOR CALENDAR 



Name of Company 


Address 


Estimated Value 
Plant and 
Equipment 


Operating 
Revenue 


Asheville Light and Power Co 

Carolina Light and Power Co 


Asheville, N.C 

1 Durham, N. C 

1 Raleigh, N. C 


$ 593,805.72 
374,677.81 
552,376.68 
188,836.38 
127,428.42 
115,324.88 
204,819.23 
227,799.76 
497,123.26 
132,484.08 
343,945.37 
180,123.56 
229,210.15 
800,000.00 
725,000.00 
110,069.77 
764,416.95 


$ 74,033.85 
140,098.19 
194,933.05 


Concord and Kannapolis Gas Co 

Fayetteville Light and Power Co 

Gastonia and Suburban Gas Co 


Concord, N. C 

Fayetteville, N. C 

Gastonia, N. C 

Goldsboro, N. C 

New Bern, N. C 

r Greensboro, N. C 

< High Point, N. C 

[Salisbury, N.C 

j Elizabeth City, N.C... 
( Henderson and Oxford. 

Charlotte, N. C 

Wilmington, N. C 

Washington, N. C 

Winston-Salem, N. C... 


49,295.14 
40.649.67 
40,449.89 
68,405.11 




44,407.44 


No. Carolina Public Service Company 

Southern Gas and Improvement Co. ._ 
Southern Public Utilities Co. . _ 


234,228.83 
48,622.10 

102,370.17 
37.734.85 
40,217.42 

405,768.16 


Tidewater Power Co. 


057,454.69 




38,346.86 




ISO, 294.. 52 






Total _. - 


$ 6.067,442.22 


$ 2,797.309.94 









GAS UTILITIES 



275 



LIGHT COMPANIES— Conhnued 
YEAR 1921 



Total 
Revenue 


Operating 
Expenses 


Taxes 


Rentals 


Total 
Expenses 


Net 
Income 


20,468.21 

1,000,459.66 

1 523 39 


11,732.33 

579,918.75 

935.37 

490.35 


502. 14 

71,267.00 

34.54 

47.23 


gl63, 256.29 


12,234.47 

814,442.04 

969.91 

537.58 


8,233.74 

186,017.62 
553.48 


816.85 




279.27 








1,178,384.94 


480,159.62 


112,402.00 




592,561.62 


B585,823.32 



GAS UTILITIES 

YEAR 1921 



Operating 


Difference 


Cubic Feet 
Gas Sold 


Receipts From 
Sales 


Average 

PerM 
Feet Sold 


Expenses 


Loss 


Gain 


S 67,031.55 
118,149.10 




$ 7,002.30 
21,949.09 
30,322.38 


54,443.900 
18,225,000 
84,845,700 
23,010,700 
14,614,200 
15,814,600 
28,218,000 
18,968,200 
95,494,700 
19,136,700 
9,686,900 
14,852,300 
15,388,300 
193,278,800 
93,342,000 
14,545,700 
73,043,400 


$ 79,547.54 
35,749.08 

167,900.35 
41,790.44 
40,414.17 
38,508.60 
66,260.39 
44,677.03 

188,468.53 
39,597.77 
20,627.05 
37,734.85 
40,217.42 

338,817.76 

201,806.87 
34,003.00 

145,051.74 


$ 1.45 
1 96 


164,610.67 




1 97 


55,670.94 


6,375.80 


1.80 


36,780.80 


3,868.87 
3,046.23 
11,386.18 
^ 1,594.28 
68,902.09 
13,891.45 
13,020.26 
3,662.10 


2 76 


37,403.66 




2 44 


57,018.93 




2 34 


42,813.16 




2 35 


165,326.74 




1 92 


34,730.65 




2.15 


89,350.91 




2.13 


34,072.75 




2.45 


48,610.57 


8,393.15 


2.52 


380,982.96 


24,785.20 
280,659.38 


1.75 


776,795.31 




2 16 


41,914.17 


3,567.31 


2 41 


146,559.81 


33,734.71 


1 90 








2,297,822.68 


16,429.97 


517,824.52 


786,909,100 


1,561,172.59 





276 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



RECAPITULATION OF EARNINGS 

INTERSTATE AND 



Railroad 



Atlantic Coast Line R. R 

Norfolk and Southern R. R 

Norfolk and Western R. R 

Seaboard Air Line Ry 

Southern Railway 

Asheville and Craggy Mountain Ry 

Atlantic and Yadkin Ry 

Carolina and Tennessee Southern 

Danville and Western Ry 

High Point, Randleman, Asheboro, and Southern. 

Tallulah Falls Ry 

Yadkin R. R 



Totals 



Miscellaneous Roads: 

Aberdeen and Rockfish 

Appalachian Ry. Co 

Asheville and East Tennessee Ry 

Atlantic and Carolina R. R 

Atlantic and Western R. R. Co 

Black Mountain R. R. Co 

Bonlee and Western 

Carolina and North Eastern R. R. Co 

Carolina and Northwestern R. R. Co 

Carolina and Yadkin River R. R. Co 

Carolina, Clinchfield and Ohio R. R. Co. . 

Carolina Railroad Co 

CHffside R. R. Co 

Dover and Southbound R. R. Co 

Durham and South Carolina R. R. Co. ._ 
Durham and Southern R. R. Co 



Operating 
Revenue 



$18,623,234.36 
6,814,019.02 



13, fil5, 026.47 

32,284,011.82 

19,807.53 

860,250.68 

38,772.59 

85,184.31 

160,733.80 

49,806.78 

346,341.83 



$72,897,189. 



187,143.75 

79,517.05 

37,417.50 

17,560.74 

43,842.77 

109,737.22 

21,232.75 

26,314.10 

574,366.44 

149,915.83 

,546,031.04 

38,412.09 

28,167.83 

68,107.11 

112,692.42 

406,166.23 



Operating 
Expenses 



334,790 
029,593.02 



929,181.51 
207,042.50 

29,431.25 
981,874.93 

42,474.09 

69,269.33 
161,991.23 

77,599.65 
385,038.72 



$62,248,286.89 



$ 144, 
6L 
37. 
14, 
62, 

101, 
21, 
24, 

597, 

146, 
2,393, 
28, 
23, 
60, 
51, 

359, 



935.09 
831.09 
522.06 
941.53 
557.33 
124.82 
008.91 
402.01 
563.05 
114.86 
120.15 
140.28 
409.43 
458.68 
529.57 
637.34 



Net Operat- 
ing Revenue 



$1,288,443.70 
*215,574.00 



2,685,844.96 

7,076,969.32 

*9,623.72 

*121,624.25 

*3,701.50 

15,914.98 

*1,257.43 

*27,792.87 

*38,696.89 



$10,648,902.30 



42,208.66 

17,685.96 

*104.56 

2,619.21 

*18, 714.56 

8,612.40 

223.84 

1,912.09 

*23,196.61 

3,800.97 

152,910.89 

10,271.81 

4,758.40 

7,648.43 

61,162.85 

46,. 528. 89 



Denotes deficit. 



RECAPITULATION OF RAILROAD EARNINGS AND EXPENSES 



277 



AND EXPENSES, NORTH CAROLINA 

INTRASTATE— 1920 



Operating 

Revenue Per 

Mile of 

Road 


Operating 

Expenses Per 

Mile of 

Road 


Total 
Freight 
Revenue 


Total 
Passenger 
Train Ser- 
vice Revenue 


Freight 
Revenue 
Per Mile 
of Road 


Passenger 
Train Ser- 
vice Rev- 
enue Per 
Mile of 
Road 


Revenue 
From 
Other 

Sources 


Average 
lieceipts 
Per Pas- 
senger 

Per 

Mile 


S 17,541.94 


$ 16,307.55 


112,472,344.03 


$5,765,019.65 


$ 11,949.09 


$ 5,323.16 


$385,870.68 


$.02637 


8,362.30 


8,626.86 


4,528,503.29 


2,119,122.09 


8,362.30 


2,600.63 


166,393.64 


.02765 


21,704.17 


17,422.58 


9,478,998.01 


3,766,917.53 


15,110.79 


6,004.97 


369,110.93 


.02943 


26,473.15 


20,669.98 


21,768,453.63 


9,762,790.87 


17,850.31 


8,006.57 


752,767.32 


.03024 


4,461.16 


6,628.66 
6,020.07 


19,802.53 
544,449.13 




4,460.03 
3,338.13 




5.00 
16,569.07 




5,274.38 


299,232.48 


1,834.66 


.02944 


2,789.39 


3,055.68 


31,688.00 


5,935.64 


2,279.71 


427.09 


1,148.95 


.02392 


9,517.80 


7,739.59 


62,914.47 


20,843.30 


7,029.55 


2,328.86 


1,426.54 


.03159 


5,773.52 


5,818.65 


104,423.77 


49,624.48 


3,750.85 


1,782.49 


6,685.55 


.02956 


3,434.95 


5,351.70 


27,393.40 


20,072.79 


1,889.20 


1,384.33 


2,340.59 


.03013 


6,631.09 


7,371.99 


263,647.57 


78,928.86 


5,047.82 


1,319.72 


3,765.40 


.03098 






$49,302,617.83 


$21,888,487.69 






$1,706,083.67 










$ 3,143.17 


$ 2,434.25 


$ 165,771.46 


$ 11,145.55 


$ 2,784.37 


$ 187. IS 


$ 10,226.74 


$ .0294 


7,951.71 


6,183.10 


68,896.68 


9,519.61 


6,889.66 


951.96 


1,100.76 


.0277 


4, 300 .-86 


4,312.88 


4,305.10 


30,786.05 


3.494.84 


3,538.63 


2,326.35 


.0178 


1,756.07 


1,494.15 


13,262.08 


3,578.16 


1,326.20 


357.81 


720.50 


.0318 


1,826.75 


2,606.55 


35,492.15 


7,857.08 


1,478.84 


327.38 


493.54 


.0300 


4,303.42 


3,965.68 


91,281.78 


14,375.37 


3,579.68 


563.74 


4,080.07 


.0308 


2,047.51 


2,025.93 


19,497.25 


1,629.50 


1,880.16 


157.13 


106.00 


.0295 


1,754.27 


1,626.80 


25,569.96 


352.42 


1,704.66 


23.61 


391.72 


.0300 


5,951.99 


6,192.36 


425,576.15 


132,761.3a 


4,410.12 


1,375.77 


16,028.90 


.03049 


4,306.69 


4,197.49 


143,198.47 


41.24 


4,113.71 


1.63 


6,676.12 


.0250 


21,686.81 


20,384.33 


2,323,211.84 


198,230.22 


19,788.86 


1.688.50 


24,588.98 


.0309 


2,933.34 


2,148.93 


31,780.57 


5,076.17 


2,426.92 


387.76 


1,555.35 


.0240 


5,633.57 


4,681.89 
2,473.90 


25,996.46 
59,904.49 


2,171.37 
8,202.62 


5,199.29 
2,435.10 


434.27 
333.40 




.0300 


2,768.55 






3,004.27 


1,373.75 
6,098.64 


111,939.02 
339,063.90 


753.40 
59,593.07 


2,984.24 
5,766.72 


254.47 
1,010.56 




.1552 


6,887.67 


7,509.26 


.0312 



278 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



RECAPITULATION OF EARNINGS 
INTERSTATE AND 



Railroad 



Miscellaneous Roaps — Continued 

East Carolina Ry 

East Tennessee and Western N. C. R. R 

Elkin and Alleghany R. R. Co 

French Broad R. R. Co 

Kinston-Carolina R. R. Co 

Laurinburg and Southern R. R. Co 

Lawndale Ry. and Industrial Co 

Linville River R. R. Co 

Louisville and Nashville R. R. Co. (X) 

Maxton, Alma and Southbound R. R 

Narron Central R. R. Co 

New Hanover Transit Co. (NO) 

Norfolk and Western 

Piedmont Northern Ry. Co 

Raleigh and Charleston R. R. Co 

Randolph and Cumberland R. R. Co 

Roanoke Railway Co 

Rockingham R. R. Co 

Smoky Mountain Ry. Co 

Tennessee and N. C. Ry. Co 

Townsville R. R. Co 

Virginia-Carolina Southern R. R. Co. 

Warrenton R. R. Co 

Washington and Vandemere R. R. Co 6 

Wellington and Powellsville R. R. Co 

Wilmington, Brunswick, and Southern R. R. Co. 
Winston-Salem Southbound R. R. Co 



Operating 
Revenue 



186,590.07 

446,985.39 

17,535.99 

39,227.92 

62,943.74 

116,734.19 

18,350.70 

181,480.48 

333,308.97 

34,871.98 

3,500.00 



1,307, 

472, 
53, 
37, 
27, 
57, 
39, 
86, 
3, 
174, 
32, 
87, 
73, 
77, 
1,139, 



625.60 
999.90 
207.05 
317.88 
044.88 
965.51 
219.97 
736.63 
813.71 
979.48 
959.45 
116.68 
893.60 
107.19 
484.54 



,559,626.37 



,456,815.56 



Operating 
Expenses 



161,201.07 

305,698.35 

18,328.31 

60,325.42 

60,415.42 

72,835.30 

27,224.65 

146,001.13 

324,310.40 

48,212.18 

3,500.00 



2,197 
392 
67 
95 
34 
72 
48 
66 
4 
123 
22 
91 
74 
78 

1,081 



,383.35 
,266.34 
,975.88 
,132.03 
,117.90 
,745.78 
,868.27 
,063.72 
,000.87 
,074.62 
.169.81 
,817.87 
,285.63 
,816.56 
,005.87 



9,806,072.93 



72,054,359.1 



Net Operat- 
ing Revenue 



25,389.00 

141,287.04 

*792.32 

*21,097.50 

2,528.32 

43,898.89 

*8,873.95 

35,479.35 

8,998.57 

*13,340.20 



389,757.75 
80,733.56 

*14,768.83 

♦57,814.15 
*7,073.02 

*14,780.27 
*9, 648.30 
20,672.91 
*187.16 
51,904.86 
10,789.64 
*4,701.19 
*392.03 
*1,709.37 
58,478.67 



*246,446.56 



10,402,455.74 



* Denotes deficit. 

(X) Mileage basis. 

(NO) Denotes not operating. 

(NF) Information not furnished. 



RECAPITULATION OF RAILROAD EARNINGS AND EXPENSES 



279 



AND EXPENSES NORTH CAROLINA— Continued 
INTRASTATE— 1920 



Operating 

Revenue Per 

Mile of 

Road 


Operating 

Expenses Per 

Mile of 

Road 


Total 
Freight 
Revenue 


Total 
Passenger 
Train Ser- 
vice Revenue 


Freight 

Revenue 

Per Mi le 

of Road 


Passenger 
Train Ser- 
vice Rev- 
enue Per 
Mile of 
Road 


Revenue 
From 
Other 

Sources 


Average 
Receipts 
Per Pas- 
senger 
Per 
Mile 


$ 4,884.56 


$ 4,219.92 


$ 159,796.30 


$ 19,081.31 


$ 4,183.15 


$ 499.51 


$ 7,712.46 


$ 


12,354.48 


8,449.37 


359,737.12 


80,123.01 


9,942.98 


2,214.56 


7,125.26 


.0302 


1,169.06 


1,221.88 


14,573.70 


2,203.20 


1,171.58 


146.88 


759.09 




4,903.40 
2,065.76 


7 540.68 


39,227.92 




4,903.49 








1,982.78 


52,374.29 


8,704.49 


1,718.88 


285.67 


1,864.96 


.0140 


6,485.23 
1 669 69 


4,046.40 

2 463 77 


115 828 49 


905.70 


6,434.91 


50.31 






17 340 75 


1,009.95 


1,569.30 


91.40 






5,337.66 


4,294.15 


145,669.78 


33,764.10 


4,284.40 


993.06 


2,046.60 


.0320 


25,250.67 


24,569.00 


239,928.74 


88,275.00 


18,175.66 


6,687.50 


5,105.23 


.03109 


2,301.78 


3,182.32 


27,828.38 


4,539.47 


1,836.85 


299.63 


2,504.13 


.0314 


350.00 


350.00 


3,500.00 




350.00 


















9,968.94 


16,752.18 


983,430.71 


286,764.87 


7,497.38 


2,186.21 


37,430.02 


.02929 


8,921.16 


7,398.46 


278,523.60 


183,995.30 


5,253.18 


3,470.30 


10,481.00 


.04511 


2,563.00 


3,274.36 


40.619.84 


11,017.74 


1,956.64 


530.72 


1,569.47 


.03296 


1,658.57 


4,228.09 


31,834.48 


1,886.83 


1,414.86 


83.86 


3,596.57 


.0300 


4 795 19 


6 049 30 


27 044 88 




4 795.19 








2 708 66 


3 399 33 


57 213 47 


752 04 


2 673 52 


35 14 




.0230 


4,085.41 


5,090.44 


38,327.98 


891.99 


3,992.49 


92.91 




.0430 


5,117.20 


3,897.56 


75,243.2] 


8,804.91 


4,439.13 


519.47 


2,688.51 


.0240 


317.81 


333.41 
2,325.01 


3,551.21 

134,747.89 




295.93 
2,545.53 




262.50 
10,057.13 




3,305.55 


30,174.46 


570.00 


.011 


10,986.48 


7,389.94 


30,877.29 


1,701.45 


10,292.43 


567. 15 


380.71 


.060 


2,127.91 


2,242.74 


62,446.91 


23,202.73 


1,525.33 


566.75 


1,467.04 


.0293 


3,358.80 


3,376.62 


60,581.97 


11,133.85 


2,753.72 


506.08 


2,177.78 


.0550 


2,570.24 


2,627.22 


44,002.63 


21,250.00 


1,466.75 


7,083.33 


11,854.56 


.0566 


11,306.65 


10,726.39 


966,893.93 


159,060.65 


9,594.11 


1,578.30 


13,529.96 


.0296 






7,895,892.83 


1,465.316.27 






198,417.27 


















57,198,510.66 


23,353,803.96 






1,904,500.94 











I 



280 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



RECAPITULATION OF EARNINGS 
INTERSTATE AND 



Railroad 



Atlantic Coast Line R. R 

Norfolk and Southern R. R 

Norfolk and Western R. R 

Seaboard Air Line Ry 

Southern Railway _ J . . . 

Asheville and Craggy Mountain Ry 

Atlantic and Yadkin Ry _ 

Carolina and Tennessee Southern 

Danville and Western 

High Point, Randleman, Asheboro, and Southern. 

Tallulah Falls Ry 

Yadkin R. R 



Totals 



MiSCELLENEOUS ROADS: 

Aberdeen and Rockfish R. R. 

Appalachian Ry. Co. 

Asheville and East Tennessee R. R 

Atlantic and Carolina R. R 

Atlantic and Western R. R. Co 

Black Mountain R. R. Co 

Bonlee and Western R. R. Co 

Carolina and Northeastern R. R 

Carohna and Northwestern R. R. 

Carolina, Clinchfield, and Ohio R. R 

Carohna Beach Ry. (NO) 

Carolina R. R. Co 

Cliffside R. R 

Dover and Southbound R. R. 

Durham and Southern R. R 

East Carolina Ry 

East Tennessee and Western North Caroli 



Operating 
l;e\cnue 



$16,561,435.11 
6,929,298.03 



12,054,803.08 

28,263,509.44 

21,359.29 

846,798.61 

31,044.51 

63,300.23 

156,047.14 

172,544.48 

303,044.07 



166,537,403.22 



S 160,7£3.17 
72,752.63 
35,244.98 
18,963.26 
53,102.59 
89,224.78 
13,061.66 
24,596.52 
571,660.14 

3,204,676.16 



40,313.08 
32,847.81 
55,917.54 
497,400.06 
162,844.74 
24,298.41 



Operating 
Expenses 



$14,596,265.80 
5,855,949.82 



8,715,846.30 

21,101,765.54 

9,446.08 

816,485.61 

28,676.28 

48,874.85 

105,113.19 

230,411.99 

248,814.70 



153,365,577.52 



$ 127,213.69 
56,553.15 
40,028.42 
13,937.60 
55,403.51 
91,767.16 
15,038.84 
34,939.46 
477,786.93 

2,020,273.38 



30,737.43 
26,943.20 
45,248.6£ 
351,018.38 
155,977.6] 
18,207.5C 



Net Operat- 
ing Lovenuf 



$1,965,169.31 
1,073,348.21 



3,338,956.78 

7,161,743.90 

11,913.21 

30,313.00 

2,368.23 

14,425.38 

50.933.95 

*57,867.51 

54,229.37 



113,171,825.70 



5 33,579.48 
16,199.48 
*4, 783.44 
5,025.69 
*2,300.92 
*2,542.38 
*1,977.18 
*10.342.94 
93,873.21 

1,184,402.78 



9.575.65 
5,904.61 
10,668.89 
146,381.68 
6.867.13 
6,090.85 



* Denotes deficit. 

(NO) Denotes not operating m 1921. 

(NF) Denotes information not furnished. 



I 



RECAPITULATION OF RAILROAD EARNINGS AND EXPENSES 



281 



AND EXPENSES NORTH CAROLINA— Con^znued 
INTRASTATE— 1921 



Operating 

Revenue Per 

Mile of 

Road 


Operating 

Expenses Per 

Mile of 

Road 


Total 
Freight 
Revenue 


Total 
Passenger 
Train Ser- 
vice Revenue 


Freight 
Revenue 
Per Mile 
of Road 


Passenger 
Train Ser- 
vice Rev- 
enue Per 
• Mile of 
Road 


Revenue 
From 
Other 

Sources 


Average 
Receipts 
Per Pas- 
senger 
Per 
Mile 


$ 15,883.68 


$ 13,998.93 


$11,468,624.26 


$4,748,662.82 


$ 10,999.28 


$ 4,554.33 


$344,148.03 


$.03456 


8,352.07 


7,058.34 


5,284.502.91 


1,515,932.73 


6,369.56 


1,827.20 


128,862.39 


.03056 


8,646.94 


12,258.35 


836,455.56 


258,341.74 


6,376.88 


1,969.52 


39,421.93 


.03391 


19,216.97 


13,894.23 


8,591,274.78 


3,199,377.08 


13,695.64 


5,100.23 


264,151.22 


.03477 


23,176.31 


17,303.62 


19,462,335.52 


8,160,030.21 


15,959.27 


6,691.29 


641,143.71 


.03479 


4,810.65 


2,127.49 


21,359.29 




4,810.65 








5,191.90 


5,006.04 


545,719.67 


289,767.58 


3,345.92 


1,776.63 


11,311.36 


.03403 


2,233.42 


2,063.04 


25,489.21 


5,410.76 


1,833.75 


317.31 


144.54 


.03440 


8,274.54 


6,388.87 


47,957.39 


13,677.13 


6,268.94 


1,787.86 


1,665.71 


.02063 


5,605.14 


3,775.62 


107,555.96 


22,205.66 


3,864.03 


797.58 


26,285.52 


.03529 


3,016.51 


4,028.18 


97,540.09 


68,470.27 


1,705.25 


1,197.03 


6,534.12 


.03571 


5,802.10 


4,763.81 


240,405.53 


59,197.38 


4,602.82 


1,133.39 


3,441.16 


.03490 






$46,729,220.17 


$18,341,073.36 






$1,467,109.69 














$ 2,700.59 


$ 2,138.29 


$ 138,564.62 


$ 11,880.86 


$ 2,293.67 


$ 199.54 


$ 10,347.69 


$ .0294 


7,275.26 


5,655.32 


67,185.02 


4,301.93 


6,718.50 


430.19 


1,265.68 


.0324 


4,051.15 


4,600.97 


3,726.50 


28,818.45 


428.33 


3,312.47 


2,700.03 


.01809 


1,896.32 


1,393.76 


15,538.83 


2,718.30 


1,553.88 


271.83 


706.16 


.0356 


2,212.60 


2,308.48 


42,391.17 


9,669.79 


1,766.29 


402.90 


1,041.63 


.0360 


3,499.01 


3,598.71 


71,985.76 


14,116.80 


2,822.97 


553.60 


3,122.22 


.0350 


1,261.99 


1,453.03 


10,642.06 


963.11 


1,028.21 


93.05 


1,456.49 


.0310 


1,639.77 


2,329.30 


23,7.50.78 


394.71 


1,583.39 


11.16 


451.03 


.0170 


5,923.94 


4,951.16 


446,217.63 


111,808.98 


4,624.02 


1,158.64 


13,633.53 


.0351 


27,297.07 


17,208.46 


2,914,219.71 


263,673.99 


24,823.00 


2,245.95 


26,782.46 


.0353 


2,647.30 


2,018.48 


34,107.18 


5,277.52 


2,239.76 


346.57 


928.38 


.0369 


6,569.56 


5,388.64 
1,839.37 


31,063.03 
47,894.76 


1,784.78 
8,022.78 


6,212.60 
1,946.94 


356.95 
326.13 




.0300 


2,273.07 




(NF) 


8,434.80 


5,952.49 


435,602.21 


56,985.23 


7,386.84 


966.34 


4,812.62 


.0385 


4,262.95 


4,083.18 


143,696.97 


15,679.19 


3,761.70 


410.45 


3,468.58 


(NF) 


7,641.01 


5,725.65 


17,134.06 


6,586.22 


5,388.07 


2,071.14 


578.13 


.0301 



282 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



RECAPITULATION OF EARNINGS AND 
INTERSTATE AND 



Railroad 


Operating 
Revenue 


Operating 
Expenses 


Net Operat- 
ing Revenue 


Miscellaneous Roads — Continued 


$ 21,315.94 
29,374.72 
75,847.78 

106,744.48 
18,951.67 

125,193.27 

306,700.28 

32,999.25 

fl, 134,219.23 

t486,325.95 

t66, 151.99 
40,058.55 

115,513.27 
65,376.79 
40,760.19 
61,166.74 
6,973.24 

162,309.70 
35,947.09 
74,079.75 

t73, 117.05 

934,792.60 


$ 28,444.17 

33,058.31 

55,461.97 

68,939.81 

18,507.30 

112,682.98 

284,521.64 

31,361.42 

fl, 607,927.36 

t429,488.51 

t48, 121.57 

46,146.79 

tl7, 008.77 

54,519.32 

33,965.86 

49,450.32 

5,600.44 

107,007.55 

26,156.41 

124,508.30 

t81,461.79 

822,375.86 




Elkin and Alleghany R. R. 


$ *7, 128.23 


French Broad R. R. Co. 


♦3,683.59 




20,385.81 




37,804.67 


Lawndale Ry. and Industrial Co. 


444.37 


Linville River R. R. Co. 


12,510.29 


Louisville and Nashville R. R. 


22,178.64 


Maxton, Alma and Southbound R. R. 


1,637.83 


Norfolk and Western R. R. Co. 


*473,708.13 


Piedmont and Northern 


56,837.44 


Raleigh and Charleston R. R. Co. 


18,030.42 


Randolph and Cumberland R. R. Co. 


*6,088.24 


Roanoke Ry. Co. 


*1,495.50 


Rockingham R. R. Co. 


10,857.47 


Smoky Mountain Ry. Co. 


6,794.33 


Tennessee and North Carolina Ry Co 


11,716.42 


Townsville R R. Co. 


1,372.80 


Virginia Carolina Southern R. R. 


55,302.15 


Warrenton R. R. Co 


9,790.68 




*50,428.55 


WelHngton and Powellsville R. R 


*8,344.74 




112,416.74 






Total 


$ 8,971,617.09 


$ 7,647,791.42 


$ 1,323,825.67 








175,509,020.31 


$61,013,368.94 


$14,495,651.37 







* Denotes deficit. 

t Denotes mileage basis. 

(NO) Denotes not operating in 1921. 

(NF) Denotes information not furnished. 



RECAPITULATION OF RAILROAD EARNINGS AND EXPENSES 



283 



EXPENSES NORTH CAROLINA— Continued 
INTRASTATE— 1921 



Operating 

Revenue Per 

Mile of 

Road 


Operating 

Expenses Per 

Mile of 

Road 


Total 
Freight 
Revenue 


Total 
Passenger 
Train Ser- 
vice Revenue 


Freight 

Revenue 

■ Per Mile 

of Road 


Passenger 
Train Ser- 
vice Rev- 
enue Per 
Mile of 
Road 


Revenue 
From 
Other 

Sources 


Average 
Receipts 
Per Pas- 
senger 
Per 
Mile 


$ 1,421.06 


$ 1,896.28 


$ 14,929.14 


% 2,172.62 


$ 995.28 


$ 144.17 


$ 4,214.18 


(NF) 


3,671.84 


4,132.29 


29,374.72 




3,671.84 








2,489.26 


1,820.21 


64,750.39 


10,616.16 


2,125.05 


348.41 


481.23 


$ .0339 


3,558.14 


2,297.99 


105,744.89 


999.59 


3,524.82 


33.32 




(NF) 


1,715.08 


1,674.87 


18,480.24 


471.43 


1,672.42 


42.66 




(NF) 


3,682.15 


3,314.20 


94,737.49 


29,104.43 


2,786.39 


856.01 


1,351.35 


.0252 


23,234.87 


21,554.67 


228,137.97 


73,941.64 


17,283.18 


5,601.64 


4,620.67 


.03382 


2,178.17 


2,070.06 


29,370.42 


1,308.00 


1,938.64 


86.34 


2,320.83 


.0360 


9,968.94 


16,752.18 


836,455.56 


258,341.74 


7,497.38 


2,186.21 


39,421.93 


.03391 


9,172.50 


8,100.50 


329,733.50 


125,885.38 


6,219.04 


2,374.30 


30,707.07 


.0376 


2,974.46 


2,163.74 


54,862.74 


9,911.92 


2,466.85 


445.68 


1,377.33 


.0361 


1,780.38 


2,050.96 


33,088.03 


1,927.01 


1,470.57 


84.06 


5,043.51 


.0306 


2,750.58 


3,977.40 


15,400.91 




2,748.39 




112.36 




3,054.98 


2,547.63 


64,545.89 


830.90 


3,016.16 


38.82 




.0260 


4,245.85 


3,538.11 


40,283.69 


476.50 


4,196.22 


49.64 




.0420 


3,608.66 


2,917.42 


53,596.35 


5,436.43 


3,162.03 


320.73 


2,133.96 


.0230 


581.10 


466.70 


6,413.69 




534.47 




559.55 




3,066.20 


2,019.60 


128,985.13 


28,671.70 


2,436.67 


543.51 


4,652.87 


.0790 


11,982.36 


8,718.80 


34,032.15 


1,914.94 


11,344.05 


638.31 




.07 


1,809.47 


3,041.23 


56,003.78 


16,231.67 


1,367.95 


396.47 


1,844.30 


.0330 


3,323.50 


3,702.81 


60,007.12 


12,124.12 


2,727.60 


551.09 


985.81 


.0410 


9,272.82 


8,157.68 


809,288.27 


114,326.41 


8,027.86 


1,134.08 


11,177.92 


.0331 






$ 7,551,942.36 


$ 1,237,375.23 






$ 182,299.50 


















$54,281,162.53 


$19,578,448.59 






$1,649,409.19 











284 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



H 



u 
o 

H 
(/) 

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c 


c 
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i 




so 
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1 


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c 




y^ 


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t>i 


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COST OF EOAD, CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



285 



^ ■>* t^ t^ r^ •* 

(M 00 (M »0 (M 03 



O 05 05 Oi 
T*< -.:*< -^ CO 

r^ ic QO >o 



lo (M rv. 
Oi iO 15 
r^; >^ ^ 



oo ro 



Cc, »o c^ 
S 'S^, o 



03 O O O O 00 

t^ o ic o o ai 

<m' o o o »o o 

t^ O <M O <M lO 



<M O "5 •* 



CO CO 
^ OO 

CO 00 



8§S 


s 


s 


s 


s 


ss 


s 


s 


£SS 


»o 


s 


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s 


s? 


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1 i s 


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1 


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02 


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02 
00 


M 

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11 




?3 


^, 




§ 


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CO 




i 



eoo^rtc<ir-iioo-H 



CO CO 05 1—1 



O OS O lO CO Tti o 
O CO CD 00 05 ■* oo 



lO ■* CO 00 (M 00 05 

Tti »-i t^ lO <M T*f e^ 

lO l-H ■*! rt r-l t^ ■<tl 



t^ •>* 



CO CO >o 
CO CO t^ 
lO TH CO 



IC CO 02 T-i 



sss§s§ 


8538 


III 1 II 


is 1 


t^ o >o OS eo o 


§51 


«>© 


JT' '"' 



t>. 00 

oT ^ 

05 CO 



ooooooooooo 

OOOOOOOOOOOO 



88 



05 o o o o 
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8 8 



ooooooooo oo 

OOOOOOiOOO t^ 

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00 o o o o 
CO Ci o o o 
— 1 o o o o 



O --i O CO O lO 
lO CO O 00 ■* CO 



T^ lO 



CO CO »0 lO lO 
■* lO t^ CO C<1 



■-I O O 05 O 
CD O O CO --I 



CO »C <M CO O <M 



o o o CO 02 

OS lO O CO l^ 
IM O O oo O 



C<l lO »0 ■* »0 <© 03 



o o o ^ 



t^ lO •*! 



^ o 

O 00 



03 O 



rrt 



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■5 o » c 
2^1 ^ 



02 H >H 



C3 rt § 

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p^ .s 

p^s 



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p5 a 



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286 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



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o < 
o o 



CO 



CO. 



SB 



05 «0 



o o 



lO o 

CO CO 



ss 

lO o 



05 O CO CO 

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t-1 o 



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<m' 06 O CO 



10 10 -^ 



-H -^tl CO 



? s 


^ S^ s 


8?2 


D »0 


i i 5^ i 


i i 



02 t^ CJ O C<l CO 10 
<M »0 Tt< 10 ^ O O 

CO 00 10 CO CO ■>*< rt 



^ g 


§g sgg? 


^§ 


§i 


-H c^ C^ Cs) 
CO 10 t^ t^ 


ii 



■^ 05 CO CO 



s s 

o o 



CO o o o o 

CO (O O O O 

CO o o o o 



0000 

§ S 8 § 



§ § 



CO -H t^ o 10 CSI o 

lo o t^ o lO r^ 10 

CO CO oa o 

00 C^ T-i 



00 T-H CO UO 

TtH »-< r*< CO <N 

(M l-H rt 



CO -^ 



t^ CO (M CO -H 

CO o »o 

CO CD CO 



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■*! IC t^ CO o -^ 
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<M 


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lO 


to 


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COST OF KOAD, CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



287 



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CO ,— I --f IC 



tn oi <:<> CO <:D CO 

00 00 00 -^ t^ CO 

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S2 


g§ s ; 


ss ss 


g § 


s s^ s § 


s g 


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3,421 

38,774 
59,925 


lis 


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t^ ,—1 


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g 


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1 


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s 


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?? 


cq 



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cq 


s 


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cq to 



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o o t^ »o o 

d o >o t-I o 

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r^ o 03 o 



o o 
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d lo 



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o o o o o o -* 



s 


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CO 


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s 


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P4 

SI 









288 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



Q ^ 

CM 
Q 0> 












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05 


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CO 


10 




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0- 




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IC 





00 


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fC 






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CO 










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CO 


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t> 






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c^ 




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p!H 






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CC 


t-' 


«■ 


cr 




r- 


t^ CC 


C<1 




00" 


l>^ 


d 










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CSl 






















CO 












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§^ 






























































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^ 



















c 







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CO 











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02 











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1 


1 






i 


s 


11 


1 


d 

CO 






1 


d 

02 




11 






1 








































































10 05 


CO 


10 






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-* 




Tt 




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■>* 










CO 




CO 02 










Tj 






C«5 -"^i 





t- 






02 


»r 




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■^ 


(M 








•^ 






CO "—I 


















CO 


CO 










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CO 




















■-I 






* 




3 






















^ 




^ 




































^ 






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* 




































^ 

o 






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s 


s 


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s 


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Q 


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c 


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CO CC 


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c 




d 


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CC 







00 


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CO 




c 


tC 


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t^ CO CO CC 


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cr 




en ■ 


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CO 


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c 






















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C3 


























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r- 
























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CC 




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CO 





c 


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CO CO 






CO 


02 






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CO 


00 






Tt 




c 




IC <M 


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c 


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00 


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[^ 


jvj 


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CO 


CO c 


g^g? 


CC 




d 


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p:; 






CV 


CO 










t^ 


CO 


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02 


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CC 










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IC 




co 






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10 


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c 


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c 




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03 1— 


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05 






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C<l 


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P^ 

i 

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p:5 




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> 

c 

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Pi -3 




pi 
pi 




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3 







a; 




03 


pi 

03 


Pi 

Pi 


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1 




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C 






p^ 


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p: 




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ll 











3 





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o 


Q 
<! 


00 


1 

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C 


C 
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03 




-d 
c 

03 


c 





c 


2" 
6 




> 

P^ 


6 



pi 
pi 


pi 
pi 


3 



-a 


3 

C 
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> 

p: 

03 

c 


03 

C 

a 


C 

"c 

o3 

c 


Up= 
>> oi 

p:; .5 

Xi c 


3 G 

IS 

03 > 

3 ii 
JD 03 

G t3 


Pi 
Pi 


-d 

G 
o3 




03 
-0 
G 
03 

03* 
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< 






z 

d 

H 
^ 


^ 


c 


_o 


_o 


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03 


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c 


03 


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> 


03 

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a 


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a 

03 


a 




^ 


1 


a 


^ 


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a 



>i 






tf 


<; <tj m m 


'0 

6 


tf 


'0 



tf 


1 


tf 


1 

a 



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UOQ 


3 

Q 


1 


1 


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3 JS 

ca o3 

h-l h^l 


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3 






03 
IS 


tf 




S 





























































COST OF ROAD, CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



289 



65,868.56 
22.084.95 


(NF) 

1,640.72 

5,043.51 
1.4fi1 Q8 


1,031.40 
686.49 

1.4.S0.97 


575.92 

4,339.83 
.'i61 . 77 


3,994.90 
1,256.47 

.SO. 844. 62 




1 




cJ 


51,358.53 

31,932.46 
58,026.39 

12,790.70 

6,133.33 


to CO 
^ CO 


3,333.33 
9,899.30 


30,032.35 
5,298.48 

53,219.79 










65,649.97 

43,410.59 
2,675.59 

13,360.46 

44,444.44 
3,333.33 
3,364.48 
5,208.33 


17,500.00 

2,663.39 
22,000.00 

3,124.22 
4,090.91 

13,251.73 










144,503.92 

79,386.40 
22,554.27 

25,455.90 

55,974.20 

8,716.31 

14,069.11 

888.11 


20,797.05 

12,345.96 
22,691.86 

19,165.73 
8,586.54 

66,994.73 










*6, 714, 614. 21 

♦1,693,059.03 
867,494.54 

*284,465.17 

138,000.00 


88 
1 ?5 


40,000.00 
524,000.00 


1,201,594.23 
116,566.74 

5,000,000.00 




CO 

o 


*8, 583, 073. 08 

*2, 301, 629. 48 
40,000.00 

*297,136.63 

1,000,000.00 
18,799.98 
72,000.00 
50,000.00 


210,000.00 

141,000.00 
66,000.00 

125,000.00 
90,000.00 

1,245,000.00 


00 
00 


to 

CO 


♦18,892,442.50 

♦4,209,066.92 
337,186.24 

♦566,141.22 

1,259,423.70 

49,159.99 

301,078.93 

8,526.62 

(L) 
249,564.62 

653,614.23 
68,075.57 

766,820.89 
188,903.98 

5,875,427.77 


So 


i 


130.74 

53.02 
14.95 

22.24 

22.50 
5.64 

21.40 
9.60 

* 12.00 

52.93 
3.00 

40.94 
22.00 

100.81 




to 


Norfolk and Western R. R. Co... 
Piedmont and Northern R. R. 
Co 


Pigeon River R. R. Co 

Raleigh and Charleston R. R. 

Co 

Randolph and Cumberland R. 

R. Co 


Smoky Mountain Ry. Co 

Tennessee and North Carolina 


Townsville R. R. Co 

Virginia, Carolina Southern 
R. R 

Warrpntnn R R C.n 


Washington and Vandemere R. 
R 

Wellington and Powellsville R. R 
Winston-Salem Southbound 
R R 
















B " 



o <u 



_ O fo 
Q k5 ^ ^ 



290 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 








«o t^ 





■* 


CO 


^H 


Q 


10 


t>~ 


t^ 


t- 


00 


00 


CO 


CO 


02 


m r^ 


t^ 


r-5 (— 










s 'S 5 2; 


00 


t^ 00 










10 






CO 


r- 


«o 






-4 CD cr 


S S 06 io 




10 t^ 


CO 


00 00 


CO 


CO 


CT> 


CO 


02 


t- 


CD 


■* 


t^ 


-* 





t^ 


C<1 ^ — 


— tt ^ c^ 




«0 -.^■" -h" -h' 


CO 


CO 00 


CO 


■>»< 








t~- 


co 


02 


CO 


^ 




c^ 


§ 


00 -^ 00 


*-H CO 00 00 c^ 




t- I^ CD -^ 


00 


05 




CD 


CD 


t^ 




Tt< 




CD 


CO 






^ 00 


CO T-H S -H 


"cS 


CO -^ -^ ^ 


00 


»o 







CO 


r^ 


^ 


-^ 




CO 




<— 1 








-►J 






^ 




^ 


^ 

























o 




































H 


• 




































00 00 '^H 


-<*< 


CO "5 


o> 


QO 


~^ 


00 




cr 


OC 


JC 


02 




CD 


IM 


-H r^ CC 


t- 02 -H — 




e<3 M ec t^ 


CO 




CO 


C^ 








S 




^ 








02 


i^ e^ o- 






■* cc 


t^ 


CO 00 






00 


a 






s 




■^ 









00 CO «= 


02 CD 02 Z_ Jo 


£ >> 


g g§ ^" ij" 


<N 


IC -*' 


02 


00 


00 


00 




cr 


ir 


c 


,-H 




02 


IC 


CO ■^'' — 




q3 c3 


<M 


CD 


CO 




t^ 


o- 




t- 


C 


CC 





? 




C32 


CO CC 




Xi ^ 


■* M (N 


-^ 




cq 


»o 


























5'3 




































^^ 






































t^ t^ >* 


•* 


UO CO 


05 


•^ 


^ 


00 


<^ 


lO 


<N 




2 




-* 


02 


CD 00 C 


t^ 00 CO CO »o 




CD »0 t^ 05 


(M 


10 CO 


CO 


05 


00 






t- 


t- 










CO 


»o ^ 




-* >0 TtH Oi 


CD 


00 CO 





CD 




5 


-^ 


t- 


(M 




CO 




CO 


I>- 


^ t- ^ 


§ M § M 


-c « 


s" g s§ ^" 


10 


-^Jh' 


CO 


10 


t^ 





CO 


co 





CO 







lO 


00 


T-( ■<*< CD 


Tti c^ oq t>r 


tH c 




CD ^ 


■* 


00 


05 


■^ 


c< 


CD 


>o 




CD 








-H CO 


-* —1 


c3-= 












c^ 
























01-5 




































^ t- 




































cS-" 




































S<^ 




































CB 






































^^^tB 


~ 


t-. t- 


CO 


~ 


~ 






c 


CC 


CC 


CO 


~:^ 


CD 


~ 


CO t- oc 


Tf<-CO 05 ^ 






t-- cq 


t^ 






CO 




>c 


CO 


CC 




c 


t^ 






•-I T^ CO r^ 02 




Tt< 00 


OS 


CD 00 




"—I 


CO 


0- 




t- 


CD 


CC 


"^ 


(N 


02 


»o 


iO 02 c: 


CD lO -* CO »0 


^ C 


(m" CD 00 00 


'^ 


CD CO 


c^ 


05 


CO 


c 


c 


<N 


cr 


<> 


00 




cvT 


00 


00 ^ -* 


■* CO ->!<' 




CO (M CD <M 


00 


CD Tt< 


00 










CC 


(M 






•^ 




»o 


'-^ CC 




"o-o « 






i-H (N 




















-* 










'^ s^ 




































O c3 (u 




































^ ^ 






































00 CD I-- (TO 


>o 


cq 


10 


■^ 


C32 


CO 






(M 


e- 


^ 


Ic 


02 


■* 


00 CO ir 


m t>~ 


CO 00 




03 cc 00 


CO 


'^ CO 




00 




0- 




t- 


t> 




s 


10 


02 


10 


t- t^ ■* 


^ CO 


^ 




CO —1 00 rt 


CO 


10 OS 


00 




S 


CO 


oc 


CC 




s 




C<I 


(M 


T-H C^ 


t^ 




1.1 


r-T c>q 02 


c^ 


t>^ d 


^ 


00 







•<*< 


-* 


t-- 


0- 


00 


CC 


-^ 


(N 


^ 








C<1 


T— 1 10 


CO 




!>. 






t-. 








0=^ 




































CC 
















































O 03 3 






































^ .g 








































CO CD 00 00 


00 


00 


"00" 


M 


!M 






o- 


iC 


c^ 


csi 


ir 


^ 


~ 


<>5 lO ir- 


00 ^ 




] 




^ 05 t- 00 









OS 


>o 






a- 








li- 


c^ 




CO '* a- 








03^0 

IP 


10 CO »o 







ca 


00 


10 






<M 


5- 




05 


OQ 


CO 







>0 "S" 






^' CD' 


l>^ 


00 -rj^' 






rt 




c^ 


(N 






M 


c: 




rt 










(?« rt 


c^ 


(M 




















•— 






































l- 
























































CO CO 'O (M 


IM 


CO 00 


CD 


Oi 


CD 


c 










>o 


cc 


^ 


~ 


10 t^ c<- 


C<I t^ 00 iC 1 




CO ^ ca TtH 


CO 






CO 


cq 


cr 


CC 




CC 


=^ 


10 




t- 


Oi 


00 i^ ■* 


-H csi 1 




rt -^ CSI 




t^ 00 


t^ 


CD 




CO 


oc 


cr 


CC 




CO 




CO 


CO 


-H 00 I> 


CM t^ 02 lO 1 


u 


10 r-H 00 00 


o» 


rjl .— 1 





^ 


05 


CT 


»c 




CC 




02 


CC 


02 


•>*| 


<-< 00 u- 


CO ■* .-H 1 


■-3 -^ n. 


^ t- ^ 





CD 




CO 


<3i 






II- 


oc 




io 




cq 


<N 




IC 


C^fl 






-H (M 


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<N 


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^ 


c^ 










CC 










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30^ 




































< 






































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1 










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>> 






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2 


c 







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a 










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T3 








Si 


M 




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to lij 















2 


0. 


03 




t) 1 








3 


c 

c3 

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2 




iMMiliMi 

. . . -g T3 = 5 , [ ^S 
g^OOOP^OWHOOU 


a 

C 


1 

1 


I 

1 

c 


cr 

i 





1 




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CC 03 ., 

5 wo 


1 


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03 

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C 

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<3 

















SUMMARY REVENUE FREIGHT CARRIED 



291 



O O O O lO 



«0 i-H 05 t^ 



CO r^ -^ 



O 00 c^ >o -H 



1 


1 


O 


i 


§i 


-# 


(M 


00 


=r 


(M eo 



•»ti 00 t^ o 



CO M CO 
— I lO 00 
•* 00 CO 



0> CO 1^ 



CO 03 IC 02 CO 
l^ I>- IM O CO 

>0 O t^ >0 00 



CO 05 in 1-- 



•i -H Tj< 


t^ ^ 


>o 




r-H 05 




t< >0 CO 






S CO '— 1 


O <M 


»o 








D ca 




CO 









>0 CO CO 00 OO Tfi 

00 O »0 t^ C^ CO 

»0 CO t^ 00 -^ CO 

CO ■*' 00 CO l>^ ^ 



(M O CO (M O -^ 
(M lO C^ CO — 



t^ ca CO t^ lO 

C^ (N t^ OO 

O O CO — 1 



-— l»O00 — COCO>C<MCOC^(M 



CO CO <— i 



rH t- 



CO O --I CO ■* ^ 
CO CO O 00 cq t^ 



t^ t^ -^ >0 03 
<M 1— I »0 t^ CO 



-* CO 

lO oo 



Tfi "-i t^ CO CO 

TJH 02 C^ CO O 

lO CO 02 o o 



rt >o cq 



cq t^ <M lo 



^ g s 

05 03 03 
►J to t, 



g^ 3 



<j s 



_J3 


2? 


-C ' 


cl 




c 1 




m 




£3 
O 


a 


"O ! 


Tt 


c c: 




ri 








M 'J 










o 


12 


o 


3 
n 














>i 'S 



--: t^ a 



^^ a 



P T3 

§■2 
z a 

« T3 



£C 



~ o 



.S fi 

c o 



n > c 



a §1-? 



O pq O O ^ M O 



^ H Pm h-l o 






a; e3 






292 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 





T-l t^ -<^ 


^ 


_, 


,—1 




C5 


-^ 


o 


CO 


t- 


lO 


t^ 


CO en 


lO 


CO 


CM 


lO 


1 ■— 1 05 


Q 




02 »0 CM 


-H O 


en 




■* 








Oi lO -^ t^ 




03 










O 00 ^_ 


t^ 00 






CM 


o 


OO 


CO^ t^^ o 


^ t- OO cm 


l— 1 




CO 


05 CD 


»c 




CO CO ->*< 


05 CO 


d 




CM^ 


CD 


oo" 


TfT d ^' 


c^f cm" co" lo" 


■^ 


cm' 


d 


t^' d 


■<}•' 




^s§3 




o= 




lO 


CM 


• CD 


05 (- lO 


O O 00 »o 


C32 


»o 


Tjl 


O CO 




1 


05 CO 






CM 


CO 




CM 








o 


lO o 


»o 


^ 


r^ 














rjT ^ 




d 


■o 


co' d 


cm" 


o 
























CM 




CM 


H 
































t- T*< lO 


t- OX 


CM 




CM 


CD 


CO 


•«tl t^ 00 


CM i-H .^ CM 


05 


■* 


(^ 


CM CT> 


^ 




lO o ^ 


CJ CO 








CD 




C<l o o 


CD 1—1 00 lO 


CO 




00 


00 05 


00 




CO ^ o 


T(H lO 


05 




s 




CO 


lO Tl< ^ 


r^ CM Tt< CD 


lO 


s 


00 


00 '^ 


CO 


II 


CO o ci 


CO ■<1< 


^ 




^ 


d 


^ 


lO co" <S 


d lo oo" »o 


cm" 


CO 


■* 


■^ CO 


oo 




lO IC 


o 








CO 


CO CO 00 


CM CO -< CM 


05 


C5 


CD 


CV3 05 




(M "O 


r^ M 






"—I 


"—I 






lO CO ^ 




CO 


O 


-H t^ 


OS 


^'S 


















^ 




CO 


d 


d cm" 


CM 




























'i' 


&^ 
























1 








00 ^ (M 


00 00 


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~ 


~ 


CD 


CM 05 05 


O ^ CM IC 


^ 


CO 


CO 


00 CM 


o 




«0 -<*( 05 




t^ 










CM CM «: 


O C35 ^ t- 








CO rl< 






CM_ <^ Tl<^ 


cr> o; 


CM 




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o 


cq 




CM Oi CO CM 


o 


o 


c3 


OO CO 


CM 


T3 QJ 

C3 S 


CO ^ ci 


00 c^ 


co' 




!>■" 


■^ 


cm" 


TjT d' -^" 


(3 ^ j»^ CO 


co" 


^ 


»o 


d d 


■^ 


CT> OC 


c<i >o 


CM 




CM 


^ 


CM 


rH >*< 


Tt- -H -^ 00 


CO 


CD 


CD 


CM ^ 


CO 


















O CO - 




O 




■-I 00 


05 


o^ 






























X2 . 
03. S 


























cm" 


cm' 






















































1 








(^ ■>*< (M 


Tj< t— 


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tT t^ CD -H 


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CD 00 t^ 


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o 






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^ 




Tj^ S o 


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CM --1 >0 ^ 




o 


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t^ 


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lO CO CO 


-* d 


^ 




CD 


cm' 


ir: 


d d CO 


co" oo" t^" cm' 


cm' 


cm' 


»o 


lo d 


lo" 




to .-I 00 




CO 




CD 








-H CO 02 CM 


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lO 00 t- 


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00 


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CM 


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CD 




00 iC >— 1 


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CO 




05 






CM -H CM 


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05 


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CD 




CO o ^ 


00 CO 


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02 






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1^1 


05 00 


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■^ co" CM 


^ 


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CO 


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CM 


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CO TtH O 


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00 


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cm" 'H 


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CM 




00 


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CO 


r- 
























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CM 




00 




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CM CO ^ -^ 




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SUMMAKY REVENUE FREIGHT CARRIED 



293 



■■ — — - — C-1 05 ■»*< 05 

1— I U5 K5 !>. 



»C 05 C-1 05 



cot-»ooo5aspoioo50o 



OC00005I>--*Tt<»000C0 



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00 CO lO "5 



M O CO CO ■<*< 



COOOi-H0500CO<MCRir5 



CO t>. CO 00 
t^ lO OO 00 






0»«0>t^lO(M«Ot-COOO 
iOOO»OOt^cOt^-HOO^ 
C0»OC0»OTtlO500C<lCOC0 



O 05 -"ti CO »o 



^ M lO -<*< 



O03lC00^O5-^COC0 
■>**030-*«50^50CO 



t^ CO o> C<l ^ 



lO c^ -"ti ir^ CO CO 



»i5 CO O (M t^ 



O 05 i-H o 



J2 tH 



00 1— I t^ C<J CO 'O (M 
CO 03 O IC -^ «5 Tfi 
00 t^ 00 OO OO (M CO 



O C^ ■* »0 CO (M 02 

02 ,— I 1^ .— I lO .-( 03 

O •^ ■* CO C-5 Tf< «o 



§ 2 



CO CO o -^ o 



O 00 CO O OS 



00 CO 05 



CO C^ -^ '— I lO 



Tj^ ^ Oi t^ CO 
OS l^ C<) <M 



•^ >0 CO t^ 



05 OO o ■* »c 



CO C^4 ^ 05 (M 



O C3 Oi 



^- 1 



O CO CO -^ 



O eS 3 



CO cq 

00 lO 



02 -^ -*l 

rt CO -*i ■* cq "* M 



(M Tf lO CO lO CD "-I 



Cq Tti 05 t^ -^ CO 



O<MO-HC0'-l'-ll0 






CO ^ lO ■<*< 



CO t^ "5 O CO <— I 



»o 03 »c o 



rt CO (M 
1-H 05 t^ 

lO >C lO 



1-H 03 O -^ 00 
O CO CO -^ -^ 
1-1 <M O "-I 



Tti CO o oo r^ c<i oo 

CO CO IM O '^ ^ CO 



■^ Oi M 02 ■«*< 






J^-^ 



si I 

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fi 02 OJ 3 Q 



-« .^ 






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g « c3 oj a; <w 

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^ O O O (iH o Whoooo^oQo 






OQ ffi pi| O Ah W 



o g 



pq ^ 



M O 



294: 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 







CD 


,_, 


•* OO U-i 


CO 


lO Ir^ CO 


oo 


■>* 


OS 


■<*< O 05 


CO 00 


^ 


,_, _, 


C= QO 


QO QO 






r-( r^ o o — 1 


irq t^ O <M O (M 




S ^ o 






CO t^ CO cq 00 CO 






r-i ec O -«< 03 


CO O CO CO »0 -<}4 


CO 


5? s 


•>• 


O t^ -K »0 t^ ^ 






.-< t^ ifs o >-" 


^ >* CO -^ ^" t>^ 


oo 


CO 1— c 00 


t--r oi 


OJ 


O CO >0 oo' 00 o 






05 g CO O 00 


CO rt 03 t^ lO 




00 05 CO 






CO -H Tl< c» O C^ 




03 




CD ^ cq 




CD t^ CO 


CO cq 




o <M cq eo CO 




















*J 


CO 


CD (M 


CO 




oo 


CO 






O 


CO 




TlH 












H 








II 






1 






•O (M 05 O cc 


lO iO CO O CD »0 


CO 


'^ oo O 


(M eo 


t^ 


CD 00 CO CO oo lO 






OO CO C«5 t^ ■* 


t^ <M ^ O t^ CD 


c^ 


^ evj r^ 


t^ CO 


05 


CO CO CO CO lO CO 






oo en en .^ CO 


■>* CO t^ »o O J^ 




t- TJH CO 


-* CD 


kO 


Tj< CO 00 CD t^ CO 




II 


'* >0 O CO 02 


-^ »0 00 O CO 00 


00 


05 CI o 


lO 00 


CO 


t^ -* (33 -H CD 




— ( OO lO CO >o 


CD >* r^ 00 


<^q 


-H CJ T}< 


■* o 


CO 


CO O -H T*. 05 




Ttl rt 




CO 


O CO c^ 


^ -H 




00 ^ ^ ^ '-' 




"S'S 


05 


c^' 


M 






lO 






















^Pi 




















in o ^ »o CO 




CO «5 C<l t:^ (M 


CO 


O O 00 


O CO 


"~co 


r- en TtH o 03 uo 










02 OO —( OO CO 


<M 




05 (M 




»o en OS o T-H lo 






CO CO 05 (M CO 




CO t^ 05 O 05 




oo o >o 




iC 


O lO CJ5 l>. »C 00 




T3 aj 


CO tJh" 05 Im" CO 




00 00 lO ^ 


cvj 


ss 5' s 


cq en 


o 


en CO ocj rt o CO 




;h C 




CO cq CO 


<N 


00 CD 


o 


t^ CO CO CO T-H 




eS-r" 






00 Oi 


oo 


lO rH 






CO 




OI-5 




















-Q t- 








(M 




""I 


<M 






g< 




















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'« 




















QD 


















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CO CO ■* t- CO 
>— 1 Oa 1— 1 CO CO 


rt oj r^ Oi rt lo 






CO o 




§s s §s^ 


.S 




>0 »0 CO CO <M -* 


■* 




eo M< 


>o 




c<i ^ lo I-: uo 


r-i r-i oo 05 CO 00 


TJH 


T-H O »0 


CO <N 


cq 


CO cq CO CO Tj! ^ 


"S 


M C 


oj CD O 05 00 


CD UO '*" ci 


tc 


CO 00 CD 


r^- oT 


^ 


O Co" CO -H ^ 


o 




rH CO CSl -* ^ 


t- csi CO rJH 


-^ 


1— 1 .— 1 -^tl 


rt tK 


•* 


oo -cf. CO t^ 


O 


"otJ a3 


t^ CO r^ 




lO 


CO —1 


03 






"^S^ 
















1 






CO 




■ 






1 


O o3 oj 






cq 












^ ^ 


































cc 


















S g 
























1 










O '- 




C35 lO lO O CO 




en en t^ CO 


1 o 




t^ c^ 


CO 


>o >o CO en 00 ■<}< 




rt Oi lo >o CO 




CO cq irq T*( 


<M 






CJ5 


O t- 03 lO 03 Tfl 






t- «5 05 




en oo CD iM 

tC cq CD ^ 


o 


o ^ 


lO «o 


CO 

CO 


03 03 CO T-( O 
l>^ OS CO CD 








CO 


oo CO 


»o 


CO 


CO t-H 


CJ 




g 






CO 


CD 




Ei 


O OS'S 


















^ ^ 


















U DC 




















3 => 




















z Q 






CO -H cq 1 




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O Cq CO 


<M -* 


^ 


^ 


00 


12 °° 


UJ 

> 






OO 00 -* 1 




(M ^ O en (N 




cs CD cq 


00 ^ 




en 


CO 




ill 




CO 00 !M 1 








.— 1 Tj( en 


o -*< 




CO 


t^ 


?q S 
























UJ 




■<1< rt 1 




CO ■* cq 


l^ 


(N T-i O 


t>^ 00 


o 


00 




oo 




CKI 1 




t- rt 00 


C31 


CO ,-H lO 




lO 








oc 




CO 1 




CO 








CO 








1 






CO 1 






CO 














> 
























cc 

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"0§ 
























s 


























S 










































13 




CO u:i TfH Tt< 1 




lo 1 ■* CO as 






CO oo 




•^ ic r-^ 00 CO c^q 


</) 




en t- o> <N 1 




^ . ^ 00 c^ 


lO 


O CO CO 


iO lO 




t^ CO ^ 03 r^ CO 
rt Ir^ ^ oo CO CO 




05 •O t- 05 1 




(M 1 O t^ -* 


t~- 




t- rH 


























o 


■<tl T- 1 O <— 1 1 




CO 1 en (Ni •-( 


«o 


CD r~r CO 


lO c^ 


•<tl 


t>r O lO »0 tJh" O 




lis 


^ CO ^=1 




t- I (M r-l 


t-; 


CO CD 


CO 


CO 


CO CO Tii 00 cq 




OS 1 








■rt< ^ 




l>- 


CD 




03 o-T 








CO 




iri 


co 






=o^ 


: 
























































^3 1 1 


V ' ' 




CC 4^ 


























p 




11 


























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i ; i 




'o 






>i 






1 ii 


a 








t3 I I 
o i 1 

OQ 1=1 1 1 
H 03 , , 

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11 


6 

03 -g 






1 

s 
s 

o 

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1 

c 
a 

c 

c 


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i i ° 

1 1 o3 


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1 
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c 


111 

S'-a ft 


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2*i3«Uh50pq00^72C 




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p^ 






S 







SUMMARY REVENUE FREIGHT CARRIED 



295 



II 


275,542 
1,302,785 
1,742,664 


in in 


126,677 
192,057 

92,760 
73,480 


42,071 

222,298 

2,398,897 

60,947 
663,525 


254,192 
118,-307 


o 

s 

CO 


CO 




^ 

CO o 

in in 

OO 


CO 

CO 

CO 

o 

03 


! 


o t^ 

m T-i 
■<)''' en 

C<1 CO 


^ 
s 


218,307 
22,107 
96,374 
481,856 
679,318 
185,029 
112,568 

66,360 
58,133 

37,149 

50,552 

15,057 

82,241 

811,140 

11,571 

180,752 

131,244 

46,468 

1,671,313 


i 

CD 


OO 00 

o o 

OO CO 


s 

i 


42,928,381 

12,807,085 

29% 


58,292 
1,531 

45,065 
220,205 
283,316 

59,055 

16,645 

7,431 

28,949 

14,345 

3,441 

6,201 

37,058 

489,733 

8,288 

222,292 

70,781 

15,521 

482,670 


CO 

i 


^1 

05 


9,878,529 

12,931,210 
3,0.52,681 

24% 


206,570 
29,679 
55,668 
241,679 
260,097 
138,693 
19,994 

43,091 
56,691 

13,596 
14,490 
13,784 
16,608 

152,920 
18,605 

201,208 
12,958 

37,099 

698,762 




i 1 


^ 


40,685,743 
11,000,808 

27%, 


9,650 

1,621 

6,584 

48,523 

118,497 

19,392 

7,634 

1,849 
7,117 

3,471 

615 

548 

11,307 

152,424 

1,348 

40,977 

4,730 

2,099 

60,929 


i 


CO -^ 


00 

CO 

m 


2,803,766 
214,448 

8% 


10,418 

159 

4,202 

166,759 

107,717 

9,579 

1,800 

3,370 
17,639 

1,387 
1,525 

760 
1,706 
9,334 

802 

11,242 

1,733 

2,446 

68.595 


i 


CJ OO 


00 


5,870,524 
999,373 

17% 


CO 
CO 


67, 649 
143,763 
293,719 
53,902 
27,156 

4,576 
23,528 

22,812 
2,857 
5,721 

73,378 
783,346 

20,333 
7,054 

32,746 

14,674 
379,775 


1 


00 CO 

<M 05 
CV5* 


o 


17,324,916 

4,144,802 

23% 


Manufactures, etc.— Conthiued 
Bar and sheet iron, structural 

iron, and iron pipe 


Cement 

■Rrif^V and nrf.ifiniql stnnp. 


1 _a. 
I C 

' 

II 

3^ 


hides other than automobiles . 

Automobiles and autotrucks 

Household goods and secondhand 

furniture 


Beverages 

Ice ^ 

Fertihzers (all kinds) 

Paper, printed matter, and books. 
ChemicaLs and exnlosives 


Textiles 

Canned goods (all canned food 


'g ! 
T3 ; 
c3 ; 

^ 1 

a| 
.| 1 

o 


1 
c 




O 1 

1 


73 









296 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



CD 



H 

O 

H 



o 



p:! 
O 

P< 



c 
o 

Cl 

1 

5 




1 § 

05 








































5 

1 


8 
1 






s 

8 


1 ! 

Q 1 ; 

1 ; 










c5 2 

00 CO 
00 cJ 






























8 • 




Investment 

By Owners 

and 

Other 

Liabilities 

S 44,690.64 



























o 

CO 










§88 

o (m" (m' 


8 

CO 


Plant, 

Equipment, 

and 

Other 

Assets 


i 


















s 


§§ 
-^'g" 


oo 






§ 


^88 

'^ CO <m" 


8 

8 

CO 


i 

1 

m 

0) 


Oct. 16, 1897 

Nov. 10, 1903 

Nov. 1913 

May 11, 1911 
1913 

June 28, 1910 

1911 

Jan. 31, 1906 
Dec, 1921 
Jan., 1921 

Jan. 1, 1920 


Location of Exchange 


1 
I 

a. 

£ 

a. 

< 


o 

■s 


03 

1 


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o 

§ 


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a 

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1 




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la 


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pq 


o 

m 

(3 

5 



o; 

< 


£ 
c 

u 
:^ 

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u 

3 


1 


> 

c 

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£ 
c 
C 

C 
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o 
« 

c 

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^^ 


II 


c 

c 
° 

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o 


i 

c 
eq 

o 


i 

a 

m 

a 
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pq 


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pq 

O 

'o 
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c 

£ 
£ 

o 

ffi 


s 

o 
XI 

X 


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; 3 
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1 ■> > 

c -- £ 

"66 

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Gil 
III 

ffl S ffi 


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o 

a 

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6 
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to 

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o 
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01 

C 
o 



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5 

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11 


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o 
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c 
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g 

£ 
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43 
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3 
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03 

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t 

O 



TELEPHONE UTILITIES 



297 



cq 00 








































§ 

cc 




















cc 




! 


1 : 

CO ! 




•; 


























































































• 
















--S 














o 




24,886.92 

2.50.00 

8,536.85 

4,674.91 


S2S 

CO e<r 

o 




































350.00 
2,152.00 
6,685.00 












§ 




25,640.08 

250.00 

10,376.47 

7,843.71 



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300 



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301 



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3,031.65 
6,731.52 

5,002.08 






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1,725.00 
10,258.91 
2,750.00 
6,181.46 
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24,000.00 
18,280.36 

16,280.32 







27,900.75 
6,641.81 


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59,981.62 

5,564.28 

3,500.00 

280.00 

1,100.00 






750.00 
6,046.18 

1,725.00 
9,950.83 
3,955.92 
5,961.16 
2,525.00 
3,000.00 
3,000.00 
4,000.00 
27,031.65 
25,111.88 

21,282.40 




2,000.00 
42,563.81 

6,541.81 

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302 



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Jan, 28. 1914 

March 15, 1921 
Aug. 15, 1902 

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303 

































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1,390.00 

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N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



so i5 i' ^ 



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550.00 

640.00 

47,248.39 

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10,329.58 

1,300.00 

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June 28, 1909 
Feb., 1912 
Feb. 26, 1915 
1898 

Feb. 23, 1912 
May, 1919 
1913 

March, 1916 
May 1, 1914 
1899 

July 18, 1907 
June, 1920 
1897 

Nov., 1907 
May, 1900 

Nov., 1912 
Sept. 12, 1903 
March 1, 1913 


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306 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



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227,687.26 

30,858.39 

15,773.08 

9,184.19 

171,871.60 

1,215.00 


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5,063.49 

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1,434.73 


840.00 

1,954.62 

285,820.67 

5,039.25 

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252,939.89 
27,439.50 
12,729.54 
10,535.43 

202,235.42 
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6,631.02 
1,050.00 
1,188.39 


1,020.00 

2,326.53 

346,387.74 

5,8.57.20 

14,230.63 


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Nov. 1913 


> 


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Dec, 1921 
Jan., 1921 


Jan. 1, 1920 

Dec. 26, 1906 
Jan. 1900 



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Albemarle Branch 

Badin Branch 

New London Branch 

Columbia, N. C. 

Statesville, N. C. 

Andrews, N. C. ( Inc. ) 

Asheville, N. C. (H. 0.) (Inc.) 


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TELEPHONE UTILITIES 



307 



3,931.33 

52,955.43 

3,111.38 

45,275.70 

4,896.38 

2,727.21 

9,126.72 

1,589.87 

6,533.83 

5,535.60 

10,676.84 

10,694.59 

22,183.81 

33,559.27 

55,196.53 

1.000.00 

6,780.40 

o 

1,127.68 
8,475.00 

6,253.68 

2,175.76 

382.70 

6,083.22 

2,727.38 

566.67 
679.03 


0<M»'3-^«Ci-^OOa50000000<MOCOO'0 iJF^'— lO OO 1 i(MO00CTi i it=0 

^cDOt^'OcOt^COOOOOOO-^O'OCSIOI^ 1 ,-*0 1 < 1 1 1 i=D i lOst^CO— i i i ,0 


ccccoJiocvjiod-xJocci-ioo^oitodto 1 Icq'od co i iodc<i-H(M' i i < iti 

O'OOtocoirflmiMcDir^c^it^rOOoot^oos i co-* co i i(MoocoTt< i i co 

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co" "j' c<r -•*' >o CO -H c^" t-T d ^ co' t>-" d 05 -H tC ■ ; ^ oo < < i i r r 00 1 1 <m' d co' I 1 ; 



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308 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



1 1 

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TELEPHONE UTILITIES 



309 



o ^ o o 


700.00 
6,564.91 
2,600.00 
1,500.00 
2,044.93 

41,327.68 
18.90 


1C<1-H t^iOC<lt^C<liOCOCO-^'— lC0OC0<MC0C<II^T}<a5f0C<500 
105CD 002lOt^02t^<Mt^-^Oi-HC«5c<3COOOCOOOTtHOOC^J0500 




■ or- OO-*i0-^C0lC-<f<C0C0«Dt^t^C<ll0-<}<00OCD-*c0r-l 
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to ^-#t^r^coOTti-Hr^ooMOio>oco-*coio-*coo^ 

1 CO rt ^ 


^s^ 


700.00 
7,564.91 
2,400.00 
2,400.00 


• o 


:§:S S3 2 8^22 S^ SgS:^^ g^SK g^S^S 2 ^ S? ^ 


1 


;Ss iilSSiiliiiiiSi^iislii 




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310 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



1 s 

g .2 

|§^ 

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Si 

CO o- 


S3 


S 

g 


o 















8 


s 


500 
1 




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11 
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1 "^^ 1 


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TELEPHONE UTILITIES 



311 



§ 








Sg§ §§J?Sg8S5° 


CO ^ 05 M O 

O CO t^ »o 


s § 


Si 


o 




2 S S; S 8 g 




1,295 
8,038 

2,010 
5,052 
1,427 
4,030 
152 
500 
1,735 
1,908 


11,818 

10,333 
2,727 
7,605 


7,629 
3,262 


P 


222 
76,384 

52,446 

7,662 

4,220 

691 


s 

i 








1,102.73 
8,084.84 

2,120.00 
4,743.94 

827.35 
4,063.44 

162.90 
11 


00 00 o 
ci co' 


11,783.22 

11,177.30 
2,658.30 

8,519.00 

o 


15,670.05 
5,580.00 


8^°; 




229.05 
72,330.50 

55,570.41 

10,488.34 

6,271.75 

622.49 



CC ^ 1-5 *-5 



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d 
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pq 



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^ ^ -^ -^ ^ I § 

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312 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 






O ^ 



O O O 00 o 



lO -H 



o 00 ire lO o lo 



-H C<) 05 
OSCOOt^"— IO500-«f 

CO CO '■^ C5 »re '-H 00 



CO csi -^ 05 ire c<i 



O 00 ■<*< 
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CO 



o ire 



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2 I 
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§ 2 



ire 00 t^ CO c^i 

Oi OJ O •* 05 05 CO 
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irec«05co-H05^cocot^coco 



CO 00 






05 03 



I 2 2 

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fe fc ^ ?^ 



05 TO TO rv flj 

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O cS 



d 



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6d£ 



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mooow;jS§z^^eM(i;tfeo;:) 



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"oi ci "o 
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3 H H 

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0. Ph P^ 



oo 






pQ a 



a a a a 
S S S £ 



= O 



h "E 



TELEPHONE UTILITIES 



313 



384.68 

1,572.76 
6,578.39 
1,533.67 
5,044.72 



8,054.52 

1,034.18 

2,883.36 

957.50 

1,925.86 


635.00 
4,758.00 

10,227.63 
o 


3,367.68 
240.00 
916.00 




ill 





'• CO 


382.43 

1,703.08 
8,760.56 
3,162.78 
5,597.78 

8,503.52 

1,290.00 
3,163.73 
1,075.00 
2,088.73 
IT 


1,255.00 
4,945.00 

"12,490.38 

o 


3,904.36 
810.00 

221.00 
If 

H 

4,800.00 



2 2 ^ 



S 2 






r: +^^'-1 oo lir:. 






c3 03 



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land 
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5" g 5^ 

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rt PL^ O P^ ffi 






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p 
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o 
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£ 




a 

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314 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 






^ O 



t^ T-H CO -* O O O 



O O r^ CO ^ 



-^ CSI CO O uo 



<M O 1^ CO 



■^ (T^ CO 00 O 

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t^ Ttl t^ 

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cft 05 oo lo m 



■^co-^-^o>n-^(r<ioi 



CO CD CO a> o CO 



'— I iC O 00 CO 



02 -"f lO o 



00 t^ lO t^ 05 
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r^ ca lo oo <M 



02 lO CM CO oo 
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O 32 <M >0 

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■^COCO-*0005CO»0 



C0-^O2C0O3-*O5C0 



^ C5 CO (M 



-* Tti 00 O CO ■*! CO 



§ 


§ 


cS 


QO 


^ 


CO ^ 


05 


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^ 


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CO 


s 


00 


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CO (>J 


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gjgg 


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CO -* 
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CO 


3: 


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^ 


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11 


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2 


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1 


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s § 


i 


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1 


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g 


i 


CO 




g 



CO CO CO CO ^^ (M CO 



CO CO c:; ■^ CO -^ 



S o ^ Q 



^ o o - 






X! m ^ 



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M ffi 02 O 



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a 


3 


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moo 



S S 5 

g g 03 

m M m 



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B OS a 



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rS o 
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§ Pi Pi 



a i^ 



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6111 

sllg 

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m m w. m 



TELEPHONE UTILITIES 



315 



o 





M 

§ 




00 o 

§^ 

CO -H 

CO oo' 


6,421.64 

427.00 

8,321.41 


O CO 

o S 




18.75 
931.69 
375.00 




= S" 


- oo iF 

i 


'°.^ 


= S S § 

CO o 


i 

CO 


o 

CO 


8 S 

o oo 






- in o 

lO o 

s ^ 

CO ira 


Feb., 1912 
Feb. 26, 1915 
1898 

Feb. 23, 1912 
May, 1919 
1913 

March, 1916 
May 1, 1914 
1899 

July 18, 1907 
June, 1920 

1897 

Nov., 1907 
May, 1900 

Nov., 1912 
Sept. 12, 1903 
March 1, 1913 


o 

o 

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CO 

z 

A- 

o 

> 


c 

c 
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3 
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c 
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> 

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c 
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O 

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